• offensive
  • His radiological agents and the mainten- philosophy of offensive warfare is ance of a constant state of prepared- definitely based on the devastating ness against such agents-is a way of sneak attack with thermonuclear wea-life and a way of life that we must pons. (ncdcr.gov)
  • Imperial Japa
  • Airmen of the Imperial Japanese Army Air Service and Imperial Japanese Navy Air Service were not included as war criminals because there was no positive or specific customary international humanitarian law that prohibited the unlawful conduct of aerial warfare either before or during World War II. (wikipedia.org)
  • bombs
  • The submarines were to surface near San Diego and launch the aircraft towards the target, either to drop the plague via balloon bombs, or to crash in enemy territory. (wikipedia.org)
  • More than 400 villagers died of bubonic plague in China s eastern Zhejiang province after Japanese warplanes of medical Unit 731 dropped germ bombs. (timelinesdb.com)
  • A later attack in 1942 on the same area by the two units led to the development of their final delivery system: airdropped ceramic bombs. (wikipedia.org)
  • An American missionary Archie Crouch reported seeing Japanese planes drop odd bombs that spread what looked like wheat over the city of Ningbo and plague erupted just days later. (wordpress.com)
  • 1931
  • In 1931 Manuilsky of the Lenin School of Political Warfare explicitly an-nounced the poUcy of subversive in-filtration, lulling the bourgeois into a sense of security with concessions and peaceful gestures, and annihUatuig him when properly softened-this entire process requiring perhaps 20 to 30 years. (ncdcr.gov)
  • chemical
  • Dr. Larry C. Ford committed suicide just days after a botched assassination attempt on his business partner at Biofem Inc., of Irvine, Calif. Ford had met with scientists from South Africa's Project Coast in the 1980s to discuss chemical and biological warfare under Wouter Basson, head of the project. (timelinesdb.com)
  • During World War I, the armament industry on both sides of conflict decided that the guns and cannons could not kill people fast enough, so they introduced chemical warfare and soldiers were suddenly dying in massive numbers as mustard gas swept over the battlefields. (eaec.org)
  • agents
  • Prisoners are deliberately infected with several biological agents, and at least 10,000 die . (whyfiles.org)
  • This has included the use of biological agents (microbes and plants) as well as the biotoxins, including venoms, derived from them. (wikipedia.org)
  • disease
  • Two instances of documents discussing the use of biological disease by the British against North American Indians during Pontiac's Rebellion (1763-66) have been examined by historians, but the actual effectiveness is unknown. (wikipedia.org)
  • program
  • Since this blog is, in part, a research tool, this post is a collection of notes taken specifically on the plague, though the book covers a much wider program. (wordpress.com)
  • research
  • We extracted some "highlights" from "Biological Warfare: A Historical Perspective," (see the bibliography ), written by experts from the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases. (whyfiles.org)