• Memorial Hospital
  • The original Baptist Memorial Hospital and Wolfson Children's Memorial Hospital in downtown Jacksonville were opened in 1955. (wikipedia.org)
  • The facility opened in 1955 as a wing in the Baptist Memorial Hospital with 50 beds and gradually grew to the point that the decision was made in 1971 to consolidate the services into a separate facility with the name, Wolfson Children's Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • After two years at Bellevue, he spent time at Boston University and Evans Memorial Hospital. (archive.org)
  • and the Jersey Shore University Medical Center (formerly Raleigh Fitkin and Paul Morgan Memorial Hospital) at Neptune Township, New Jersey. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2) Not currently participating in a postgraduate medical education program at Duke University, University of No rth Carolina at Chapel Hill, Bowman Gray- North Carolina Baptist Hospitals, Moses Cone Hospital , Charlotte Memorial Hospital, New Hanover Memori al Hospital, Mountain AHEC in Asheville, and Eastern AHEC in Greenville. (ncdcr.gov)
  • 2) Not currently participating in a postgraduate medical education program at Duke Unive rsity, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill , Bowman Gray-North Ca rolina Baptist Hospitals , Moses Cone Hospital, Charlotte Memorial Hospital, New Hanover Memo r ial Hospital, Mountain AHEC in Ashevi lle , and Eastern AHEC in Greenville. (ncdcr.gov)
  • centers
  • Spartanburg Medical Center was the first hospital in the Upstate to earn Center of Excellence status for its gastric bypass surgery program and is also the site of South Carolina's first Joint Commission-accredited Chest Pain and Primary Stroke centers. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1985
  • In 1985, the hospital received a two Army Superior Unit citations for its use of Medical Unit Self-Contained Transportable (MUST) hospital operating room equipment during a renovation of the facility's operating rooms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Garner JS, Favero MS. CDC guideline for handwashing and hospital environmental control, 1985. (cdc.gov)
  • care
  • Baptist Health, based in Jacksonville, Florida, is a network of five hospitals, affiliated with 45 primary care offices located throughout Northeast Florida and Southeast Georgia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wolfson Children's Hospital delivers specialized care to children from birth to age 18+ with a full range of needs, from routine to complex. (wikipedia.org)
  • There, he was moved and inspired by the poor conditions of war, and by the care provided at the hospitals run by Florence Nightingale. (wikipedia.org)
  • An early survey of patients shows that in 1899, 5,747 Christians and 2,680 Muslims sought care in the hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • SRHS is composed of Spartanburg Medical Center, Pelham Medical Center, Spartanburg Hospital for Restorative Care, Union Medical Center, Medical Group of the Carolinas, Ellen Sagar Nursing Center and Regional HealthPlus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pelham Medical Center (PMC), formerly known as Village Hospital, was created to bring a new approach to health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 872, Ahmad ibn Tulun built a hospital in Cairo that provided care to the insane, which included music therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus in-patient medical care in the sense of what we today consider a hospital, was an invention driven by Christian mercy and Byzantine innovation. (wikipedia.org)
  • care hospital, serving communities in With the outstanding clinical, research and educational abilities of Cleveland. (my-php.net)
  • A Comparison of 1978 and 1979 Population per Active Health Personnel Ratios for all Nonfederal/NonResident Physicians, Nonfederal/Nonreaident Primary Care Physicians, Dentists, and Registered Nurses for the State and Each County 1979 North Carolina Inpatient Health. (ncdcr.gov)
  • Skilled Nursing Facility residents and Adult Day Health Care registrants are extremely excited to have the new bus in time to go to the Wyoming County Fair, hospital officials say. (wyomingcountyfreepress.com)
  • patients
  • Only a year after the expansion, 36 inpatients were admitted, and 70-100 patients were treated daily. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among the earliest were those built ca. 370 by St. Basil the Great, bishop of Caesarea Mazaca in Cappadocia in Asia Minor (modern-day Turkey), by Saint Fabiola in Rome ca. 390, and by the physician-priest Saint Sampson (d. 530) in Constantinople, Called the Basiliad, St. Basil's hospital resembled a city, and included housing for doctors and nurses and separate buildings for various classes of patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • Windsor Laurelwood Hospital 35900 Euclid Avenue, Willoughby, Ohio Read What Our Patients Mental Health and Addictive Disease Treatment. (my-php.net)
  • When patients are admitted to psychiatric facilities, they are encouraged to create positive systems for themselves outside of the hospital, which will help them to survive independently of the need for hospitalization. (tamuc.edu)
  • Health
  • In 2014, PeaceHealth completed a renovation of the University District facility and greatly expanded the Johnson Behavioral Health inpatient unit. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Baptist Heart Hospital is run by the Baptist Heart Specialists division of Baptist Health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hadassah fundraises for community programs and health initiatives in Israel, including the Hadassah Medical Center, a leading research hospital in Israel renowned for its inclusion of and treatment for all religions and races in Jerusalem. (wikipedia.org)
  • Over the next few years, the Unit, based in the old Rothschild Hospital in Jerusalem, initiated American-style health and welfare programs with intensive campaigns to wipe out malaria, cholera, trachoma and scalp diseases in many Jewish communities in the yishuv. (wikipedia.org)
  • early
  • citation needed] In the early 2000s, the hospital needed to expand again but could not because of the surrounding buildings. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the early 1990s, the hospital's name was changed to Baptist Medical Center Downtown and the hospital is now called Baptist Medical Center Jacksonville. (wikipedia.org)
  • Christian emphasis on practical charity gave rise to the development of systematic nursing and hospitals after the end of the persecution of the early church. (wikipedia.org)
  • tower
  • In 2012, Hadassah opened the Sarah Wetsman Davidson Hospital Tower, a 500 bed-facility with 20 operating theaters, as well as five below-ground floors for protection from terrorist attacks. (wikipedia.org)
  • Programs
  • Some hospitals maintained libraries and training programs, and doctors compiled their medical and pharmacological studies in manuscripts. (wikipedia.org)
  • addition
  • The hospital staff ran a boys' Sunday school and soup kitchen, as well as an artists' club, in addition to normal hospital operations. (wikipedia.org)
  • The 20th's will charge 50 cents in putting their free time into a clerks, typists, shop aides, project coordinator and assistantto accomplishments and problemareas addition to the regular cost productive and educational hospital assistants and car- the station Administration in meeting its peacetime of the license plates to go program called "Operation penters at major departments.While Officer. (ufl.edu)
  • Medical Center
  • The three (Caraga, Miranda Hospital and Surigao Medical Center) all are located within 1 1⁄2 miles (2.4 km) of each other on National Road, which leads from the city proper south to the city airport. (wikipedia.org)
  • 123.08194 PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center University District is a hospital in Eugene, Oregon, United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sacred Heart Medical Center in Eugene began as Pacific Christian Hospital, which was founded by Eugene Bible University, now Northwest Christian University and dedicated on March 16, 1924. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sacred Heart General Hospital Medical Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beaches Hospital originally opened in Jacksonville Beach in 1961 and was replaced by the First Coast Medical Center in November 1988. (wikipedia.org)
  • Spartanburg Medical Center was the first hospital in the state and the U.S. to develop a comprehensive Hospital Emergency Response Team (HERT). (wikipedia.org)
  • University Hospitals Case Medical Center. (my-php.net)
  • Physician
  • The system of public hospitals continued until the fall of Buddhism in India ca. 750 C.E. About 100 B.C.E. the Charaka Samhita was written in India, stating that good medical practice requires a patient, physician, nurse, and medicines, with the nurse required to be knowledgeable, skilled at preparing formulations and dosage, sympathetic towards everyone, and clean. (wikipedia.org)
  • Byzantine hospital staff included the Chief Physician (archiatroi), professional nurses (hypourgoi) and orderlies (hyperetai). (wikipedia.org)
  • As Chief Medical Officer, Mason will assist with hospital strategic planning, physician recruiting, patient satisfaction, as well as community education and involvement. (wyomingcountyfreepress.com)
  • public
  • It was during the nineteenth century that the public and private sectors of hospitals came into existence. (tamuc.edu)
  • facility
  • Sacred Heart in Eugene had been the largest hospital in the area until the newer facility at RiverBend opened in August 2008. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1965, the facility was expanded again to 366 beds total. (wikipedia.org)
  • UF-Jacksonville's Pediatric Residency Program uses the hospital as its main pediatric teaching facility. (wikipedia.org)
  • When the tests set out by the Rules are satisfied, the accused may be adjudged "not guilty by reason of insanity" or "guilty but insane" and the sentence may be a mandatory or discretionary (but usually indeterminate) period of treatment in a secure hospital facility, or otherwise at the discretion of the court (depending on the country and the offence charged) instead of a punitive disposal. (wikipedia.org)
  • boys
  • extra help from the young em- and progress being made in Ii will be selling the tags ont Daisy Harris or 15-year-old About 100 boys and girls are ployees.The satisfying the command's weekdaysfrom830a.m.to Andrew Jackson. (ufl.edu)
  • general
  • The EMMS Nazareth Hospital, also known as Scottish Hospital and English Hospital, is the general hospital of the city of Nazareth, Israel. (wikipedia.org)
  • Beale AFB was established in 1942 as Camp Beale and is named for Edward Fitzgerald Beale (1822-1893), a former Lieutenant in the U.S. Navy and a Brigadier General in the California Militia who was an explorer and frontiersman in California. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its inhabitants could roam around its confines and possibly throughout the general neighborhood in which the hospital was situated. (wikipedia.org)
  • adjacent
  • As the only hospital near Nazareth, these accommodations were obviously insufficient, and Dr. Vartan soon received approval from the EMMS for the purchase for two adjacent houses. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • After much searching and discussions around the community, the new hospital was located in neighboring Springfield, Oregon in what is now known the Riverbend area. (wikipedia.org)
  • doctors
  • By the twelfth century, Constantinople had two well-organized hospitals, staffed by doctors who were both male and female. (wikipedia.org)
  • small
  • The ancient Parisian hospital Hôtel-Dieu also had a small number of cells set aside for lunatics, whilst the town of Elbing boasted a madhouse, the Tollhaus, attached to the Teutonic Knights' hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • rise
  • The rise of the lunatic asylum and its gradual transformation into, and eventual replacement by, the modern psychiatric hospital, explains the rise of organised, institutional psychiatry. (wikipedia.org)