• Gluecks
  • This resulted in the Gluecks' "Social Prediction Tables" that gave predictions of the likelihood of juvenile delinquency based upon parameters from when the youths were six years old. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1921: mean birth date of College sample 1929: mean birth date of Core City sample 1938: study on the College sample begins at Harvard 1940: Gluecks begin the Core City study 1971-2: Clinic study begins 1972-4: Vaillant takes over the College and Core City samples. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1947
  • On the Longing to Die', International Journal of Psycho-Analysis XXI (1940) ___'Children's Books and their Function in Latency and Puberty' American Imago III (1942) ___The Psycho-Analytic Approach to Juvenile Delinquency (1947) Annie Reich August Aichhorn Controversial discussions Oceanic feeling Otto Fenichel Paula Heimann Wilhelm Reich F. Alexander et al eds. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1938
  • I believe the first feature I purchased from Eisner & Iger was "Espionage" in 1938 for Feature Comics (then Feature Funnies), and in 1939 I started buying material from them for Smash Comics, but it wasn't until 1940, when they supplied most of the pages for my five new titles as well as some material for Police Comics, that I became op customer with Eisner and Iger. (wikipedia.org)
  • Receptive to a sales call by Eisner & Iger, one of the prominent "packagers" of that time which produced complete comic books on demand for publishers looking to enter the field, Scott published Jumbo Comics #1 (Sept. 1938) under the company's Real Adventures Publishing Company imprint. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sheena appeared in every issue of Jumbo Comics (Sept. 1938 - April 1953), as well as in her groundbreaking, 18-issue spin-off, Sheena, Queen of the Jungle (Spring 1942 - Winter 1952), the first comic book to title-star a female character. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bromley did publicity and editorial work for Henry Holt and Company (1921-1924) and was a columnist and writer for the New York World-Telegram (1935-1937), the New York Post (1938-1940) and the New York Herald Tribune (1942-1952), of which she was also editor for the Sunday women's activities page. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1936
  • That said, aside from the original radio program, a book, Junior 'G' Men's Own Mystery Stories (by Gilbert A. Lathrop, Edward O'Connor, and Norton Hughs Jonathan) was published in 1936 and a big little book by Morrell Massey and Henry E. Vallely the following year. (wikipedia.org)
  • New York: Charles Scribner's Sons 1936: Organizing to Reduce Delinquency: The Michigan Plan for Better Citizenship (ASIN B00086R4XC) 1936: What's Wrong with Juvenile Probation and Parole in Michigan: Report of a Survey of 230 Probationers and 120 Parolees in Six Counties (ASIN B0008AH8IE) 1939: Integrating the Camp, the Community and Social Work. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cancelled pulps Fight Stories and Detective Book Magazine were revived in spring 1936 and in 1937 respectively, with both magazines publishing continuously into the 1950s. (wikipedia.org)
  • minors
  • After the publication of Fredric Wertham's Seduction of the Innocent the following year that claimed comics sparked illegal behavior among minors, comic book publishers such as EC's William Gaines were subpoenaed to testify in public hearings. (wikipedia.org)
  • In recognition of his pioneering work on understanding and preventing delinquency in minors, Carr became the director of the Michigan Child Guidance Institute and was its spokesperson for several years in the 1940s. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1934
  • There he sold presses to Waterbury, Connecticut's Eastern Color Printing (future publisher of the first American comic book, Famous Funnies #1, May 1934), and to the McClure Syndicate in Baltimore, Maryland. (wikipedia.org)
  • sociology
  • During his tenure as a professor, he co-wrote one of the leading early reference works discussing modern sociology with Charles Cooley and Robert C. Angell, a book that is still often quoted. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1940s
  • Farrell Publications is the name of a series of American comic book publishing companies founded and operated by Robert W. Farrell in the 1940s and 1950s, including Elliot Publishing Company, Farrell Comic Group, and Excellent Publications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Everett M. Arnold (May 20, 1899 - December 1974), also known as Busy Arnold, was an American publisher and an early comic-book entrepreneur whose company Quality Comics published during the 1930s and 1940s period fans and historians call the Golden Age of Comic Books. (wikipedia.org)
  • Theory
  • Building of the early work of Albert J. Reiss (1951), Reckless' theory posits that social control - which constrains deviance, delinquency, and crime - included 'inner' (i.e., strong conscience or a "good self-concept") and 'outer' forces of containment (i.e., supervision and discipline by parents and the school, strong group cohesion, and a consistent moral front). (wikipedia.org)
  • The problem with Wertham's approach is that he has an agenda (to prove comic books are bad) and then sets out to find examples which support his theory while discarding those that don't. (blogspot.com)
  • Comics
  • Yet barely half a century later, in the early 90's, Superman and other comic book heroes had become cultural icons, courses in Comics Studies were offered by a number of universities, and Art Spiegelman's graphic novel Maus had won a Pulitzer Prize. (clarkesworldmagazine.com)
  • In 1940, Farrell worked as an editor for Fox Comics. (wikipedia.org)
  • A number of Ace stories were used as examples of violent and gruesome imagery in the 1950s U.S Congressional inquiries into the influence of comic books on juvenile delinquency that led to the Comics Code Authority, namely Challenge of the Unknown #6, Crime Must Pay the Penalty #3 and Web of Mystery #19. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arnold began developing an in-house staff, with George Brenner, writer-artist of comic books' first masked adventurer-the Comics Magazine Company's the Clock-among his first employees. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gardner Francis Cooper Fox (May 20, 1911 - December 24, 1986) was an American writer known best for creating numerous comic book characters for DC Comics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Comic book historians estimate that he wrote more than 4,000 comics stories, including 1,500 for DC Comics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Debuting as a writer in the pages of Detective Comics, Fox "intermittently contributed tales to nearly every book in the DC lineup during the Golden Age. (wikipedia.org)
  • Even as comic books became demonized at the time, so over the years has Fredric Wertham to many comics fans the world over. (blogspot.com)
  • Did a child ever become a juvenile deliquent without reading crime comics? (blogspot.com)
  • The opening page of Robin's debut story in the April 1940 issue of Detective Comics No. 38 featured an introductory scroll jammed with breathless declamatory copy about "THE SENSATIONAL CHARACTER FIND OF 1940 … ROBIN, THE BOY WONDER! (slate.com)
  • work
  • I've not read another book that so clearly spells out not only what the Constitution means and how it came to be, but one that details how important religion actually was to the founders, and how profoundly it influenced their work. (thetruthaboutguns.com)
  • Her book Birth Control, Its Use and Misuse, was a product of Bromley's visits to maternity clinics in New York City, and was the first work on birth control methods for the general public. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through consistent hard work, sometimes after years of perseverance, the dreams became reality: the creation of kindergarten classes, child labor laws, a public health service, hot lunch programs, a juvenile justice system, and mandatory immunization were accepted as national norms. (mdpta.org)
  • Crime
  • Junior G-Men was part of the larger "war on crime" campaign being waged through the mass media, which included movies, comic books and strips, radio programs, and pulp books, all of which was encouraged by the FBI and especially its director, J. Edgar Hoover prior to World War II. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1937
  • Junior G-Men serial from the Internet Archive Junior G-Men and the Counterfeiters 1937 big little book. (wikipedia.org)
  • WorldCat
  • Santa Barbara, Calif: ABC-CLIO, 2008 According to WorldCat, the book is held in 1504 libraries Champion, Dean J. The American Dictionary of Criminal Justice: Key Terms and Major Court Cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • criminal
  • The books, articles, research reports, and cases in each section include required texts for the MACJ foundation courses as well as additional classic and contemporary works, key cases, and critical research in criminal justice. (seattleu.edu)
  • research
  • The National Review hailed the first edition (1983) as "a genuine revolution in the field of alcoholism research" and said that "Vaillant has combined clinical experience with an unprecedented amount of empirical data to produce what may ultimately come to be viewed as the single most important contribution to the literature of alcoholism since the first edition of AA's Big Book. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1930s
  • By the late 1930s, publisher Thurman T. Scott expanded Fiction House into comic books, an emerging medium that began to seem a viable adjunct to the fading pulps. (wikipedia.org)
  • problem
  • In the 1983 edition of his book, Vaillant required four positive answers to questions on his Problem Drinking Scale (PDS) to indicate alcohol abuse. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Los Angeles newspapers described Mexicans with racially inflammatory propaganda, suggesting a problem with juvenile delinquency. (wikipedia.org)
  • Publications
  • Dr. Wertham was praising the efforts of comic-book readers, and presenting (their) internal hobby publications as the very model of non-violent communication by bright young people. (blogspot.com)
  • Studies
  • The Natural History of Alcoholism Revisited (1995) is a book by psychiatrist George E. Vaillant that describes two multi-decade studies of the lives of 600 American males, non-alcoholics at the outset, focusing on their lifelong drinking behaviours. (wikipedia.org)
  • major
  • Superman's popularity helped make comic books a major arm of publishing, which led rival companies to create superheroes of their own to emulate Superman's success. (wikipedia.org)
  • among
  • Eduardo Obregón Pagán wrote, "Many Angelenos saw the death of José Díaz as a tragedy that resulted from a larger pattern of lawlessness and rebellion among Mexican American youths, discerned through their self-conscious fashioning of difference, and increasingly called for stronger measures to crack down on juvenile delinquency. (wikipedia.org)
  • He became an active and leading member of the Munka Kör, his partners in socio-photography were among others Sándor Gönci, Árpád Szélpál and Lajos Lengyel, who later became renowned graphic artist and book designer. (wikipedia.org)
  • heroes
  • Patriotic heroes donning red, white, and blue were particularly popular during the time of the second World War following The Shield's debut in 1940. (wikipedia.org)
  • early
  • Compare the fears expressed about cinema and comic books in the early twentieth century to Philip Stubbes' condemnation of theater in 1583: 'If you will learn to rebel against Princes, to commit treasons, to consume treasures, to practice idleness, to sing and talk of bawdy love and venery. (clarkesworldmagazine.com)
  • comic-book characters
  • According to historian Michael A. Amundson, appealing comic-book characters helped ease young readers' fear of nuclear war and neutralize anxiety about the questions posed by atomic power. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studio
  • All four books were produced by the Iger Studio and featured a consistent "house style. (wikipedia.org)
  • With help of Japanese friends he opened and operated his photo studio in Tokyo between 1940 and 42. (wikipedia.org)
  • Novels
  • From 1969 to 1970, Belmont Books published a series of sword and sorcery novels by Fox, featuring the barbarian character Kothar. (wikipedia.org)
  • several
  • During World War II, Fox assumed responsibility for a variety of characters and books of several of his colleagues who had been drafted. (wikipedia.org)
  • World
  • Subtitled 28 Great Ideas that Changed the World, the book is actually a chronicle of how our founding fathers came to create the U.S. Constitution from sources of inspiration as diverse as the Magna Carta and the Holy Bible. (thetruthaboutguns.com)
  • Wrecked: When a Broken World Slams into Your Comfortable Life, by Jeff Goins, Wrecked is an inspiring book that will "wreck" your life. (blogspot.com)
  • He is best known for his book Willow Run, which discusses the sociological conditions arising from the wartime increase in the worker population at the Willow Run bomber plant during World War II. (wikipedia.org)
  • On or about his eleventh birthday, he been given The Gods of Mars and The Warlord of Mars by Edgar Rice Burroughs, books which "opened up a complete new world for me. (wikipedia.org)
  • These were followed in 1976 by another series (published by Leisure Books) featuring the barbarian Kyrik: Kyrik: Warlock Warrior, Kyrik Fights the Demon World , Kyrik and the Wizard's Sword and Kyrik and the Lost Queen. (wikipedia.org)
  • read
  • I'd recommend that you read a book, in this case a very good book, The Five Thousand Year Leap , by W. Cleon Skousen. (thetruthaboutguns.com)
  • The book had been a labor of love for their dad, but hadn't generated much attention until Glenn Beck read it and publicized it on his show. (thetruthaboutguns.com)