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  • 1947
  • On the Longing to Die', International Journal of Psycho-Analysis XXI (1940) ___'Children's Books and their Function in Latency and Puberty' American Imago III (1942) ___The Psycho-Analytic Approach to Juvenile Delinquency (1947) Annie Reich August Aichhorn Controversial discussions Oceanic feeling Otto Fenichel Paula Heimann Wilhelm Reich F. Alexander et al eds. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1938
  • I believe the first feature I purchased from Eisner & Iger was "Espionage" in 1938 for Feature Comics (then Feature Funnies), and in 1939 I started buying material from them for Smash Comics, but it wasn't until 1940, when they supplied most of the pages for my five new titles as well as some material for Police Comics, that I became op customer with Eisner and Iger. (wikipedia.org)
  • Receptive to a sales call by Eisner & Iger, one of the prominent "packagers" of that time which produced complete comic books on demand for publishers looking to enter the field, Scott published Jumbo Comics #1 (Sept. 1938) under the company's Real Adventures Publishing Company imprint. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sheena appeared in every issue of Jumbo Comics (Sept. 1938 - April 1953), as well as in her groundbreaking, 18-issue spin-off, Sheena, Queen of the Jungle (Spring 1942 - Winter 1952), the first comic book to title-star a female character. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bromley did publicity and editorial work for Henry Holt and Company (1921-1924) and was a columnist and writer for the New York World-Telegram (1935-1937), the New York Post (1938-1940) and the New York Herald Tribune (1942-1952), of which she was also editor for the Sunday women's activities page. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1950s
  • Farrell Publications is the name of a series of American comic book publishing companies founded and operated by Robert W. Farrell in the 1940s and 1950s, including Elliot Publishing Company, Farrell Comic Group, and Excellent Publications. (wikipedia.org)
  • A number of Ace stories were used as examples of violent and gruesome imagery in the 1950s U.S Congressional inquiries into the influence of comic books on juvenile delinquency that led to the Comics Code Authority, namely Challenge of the Unknown #6, Crime Must Pay the Penalty #3 and Web of Mystery #19. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fiction House was an American publisher of pulp magazines and comic books that existed from the 1920s to the 1950s. (wikipedia.org)
  • The cancelled pulps Fight Stories and Detective Book Magazine were revived in spring 1936 and in 1937 respectively, with both magazines publishing continuously into the 1950s. (wikipedia.org)
  • John Thomas Alexis Craig (April 25, 1926 - September 13, 2001), better known as Johnny Craig, was an American comic book artist notable for his work with the EC Comics line of the 1950s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Craig's many covers included that of the infamous Crime SuspenStories #22, shown during the 1950s Senate hearings on juvenile delinquency. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1936
  • That said, aside from the original radio program, a book, Junior 'G' Men's Own Mystery Stories (by Gilbert A. Lathrop, Edward O'Connor, and Norton Hughs Jonathan) was published in 1936 and a big little book by Morrell Massey and Henry E. Vallely the following year. (wikipedia.org)
  • New York: Charles Scribner's Sons 1936: Organizing to Reduce Delinquency: The Michigan Plan for Better Citizenship (ASIN B00086R4XC) 1936: What's Wrong with Juvenile Probation and Parole in Michigan: Report of a Survey of 230 Probationers and 120 Parolees in Six Counties (ASIN B0008AH8IE) 1939: Integrating the Camp, the Community and Social Work. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1934
  • There he sold presses to Waterbury, Connecticut's Eastern Color Printing (future publisher of the first American comic book, Famous Funnies #1, May 1934), and to the McClure Syndicate in Baltimore, Maryland. (wikipedia.org)
  • minors
  • After the publication of Fredric Wertham's Seduction of the Innocent the following year that claimed comics sparked illegal behavior among minors, comic book publishers such as EC's William Gaines were subpoenaed to testify in public hearings. (wikipedia.org)
  • In recognition of his pioneering work on understanding and preventing delinquency in minors, Carr became the director of the Michigan Child Guidance Institute and was its spokesperson for several years in the 1940s. (wikipedia.org)
  • offenders
  • They were the first criminologists to perform studies of chronic juvenile offenders and among the first to examine the effects of psychopathy among the more serious delinquents. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1956
  • The Wyns had been publishing pulp fiction under the Periodical House and A. A. Wyn's Magazine Publishers names since 1928, and published comics between 1940 and the end of 1956. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ace's longest running series were the company's romance comics Glamorous Romances, Love At First Sight, Love Experiences and Real Love, which began in the late 1940s as the superhero books faded away, and continued until the company ceased publishing comic books in 1956. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • Tenison Woods received a grant from the Carnegie Corporation to study delinquency in South Australia. (wikipedia.org)
  • From 1935 to 1940, Tenison Woods taught on the legal aspects of social work at Sydney University and was a member of the University Board of Social Study and Training. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1940s
  • Everett M. Arnold (May 20, 1899 - December 1974), also known as Busy Arnold, was an American publisher and an early comic-book entrepreneur whose company Quality Comics published during the 1930s and 1940s period fans and historians call the Golden Age of Comic Books. (wikipedia.org)
  • Theory
  • Building of the early work of Albert J. Reiss (1951), Reckless' theory posits that social control - which constrains deviance, delinquency, and crime - included 'inner' (i.e., strong conscience or a "good self-concept") and 'outer' forces of containment (i.e., supervision and discipline by parents and the school, strong group cohesion, and a consistent moral front). (wikipedia.org)
  • Crime
  • Junior G-Men was part of the larger "war on crime" campaign being waged through the mass media, which included movies, comic books and strips, radio programs, and pulp books, all of which was encouraged by the FBI and especially its director, J. Edgar Hoover prior to World War II. (wikipedia.org)
  • Comics
  • In 1940, Farrell worked as an editor for Fox Comics. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a result, the Comics Code Authority was created by the Association of Comics Magazine Publishers to enact self-censorship by comic book publishers. (wikipedia.org)
  • The new material came from comics "packagers", small studios that sprang up to produce comics on demand for publishers looking to enter the emerging comic-book field. (wikipedia.org)
  • Arnold began developing an in-house staff, with George Brenner, writer-artist of comic books' first masked adventurer-the Comics Magazine Company's the Clock-among his first employees. (wikipedia.org)
  • While attending classes, he began working in 1940 as an assistant of Harry Lampert, co-creator of All-American Comics' Golden Age superhero the Flash. (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • The National Review hailed the first edition (1983) as "a genuine revolution in the field of alcoholism research" and said that "Vaillant has combined clinical experience with an unprecedented amount of empirical data to produce what may ultimately come to be viewed as the single most important contribution to the literature of alcoholism since the first edition of AA's Big Book. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research project into the causes and treatment of juvenile delinquency. (worldcat.org)
  • work
  • I've not read another book that so clearly spells out not only what the Constitution means and how it came to be, but one that details how important religion actually was to the founders, and how profoundly it influenced their work. (thetruthaboutguns.com)
  • Her book Birth Control, Its Use and Misuse, was a product of Bromley's visits to maternity clinics in New York City, and was the first work on birth control methods for the general public. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1930s
  • By the late 1930s, publisher Thurman T. Scott expanded Fiction House into comic books, an emerging medium that began to seem a viable adjunct to the fading pulps. (wikipedia.org)
  • pulp
  • Ace Magazines was a comic-book and pulp-magazine publishing company headed by Aaron A. Wyn and his wife Rose Wyn. (wikipedia.org)
  • problem
  • In the 1983 edition of his book, Vaillant required four positive answers to questions on his Problem Drinking Scale (PDS) to indicate alcohol abuse. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Los Angeles newspapers described Mexicans with racially inflammatory propaganda, suggesting a problem with juvenile delinquency. (wikipedia.org)
  • comic book
  • The educational comic book Dagwood Splits the Atom used characters from the comic strip Blondie. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to historian Michael A. Amundson, appealing comic-book characters helped ease young readers' fear of nuclear war and neutralize anxiety about the questions posed by atomic power. (wikipedia.org)
  • describes
  • The Natural History of Alcoholism Revisited (1995) is a book by psychiatrist George E. Vaillant that describes two multi-decade studies of the lives of 600 American males, non-alcoholics at the outset, focusing on their lifelong drinking behaviours. (wikipedia.org)
  • major
  • Superman's popularity helped make comic books a major arm of publishing, which led rival companies to create superheroes of their own to emulate Superman's success. (wikipedia.org)
  • among
  • Eduardo Obregón Pagán wrote, "Many Angelenos saw the death of José Díaz as a tragedy that resulted from a larger pattern of lawlessness and rebellion among Mexican American youths, discerned through their self-conscious fashioning of difference, and increasingly called for stronger measures to crack down on juvenile delinquency. (wikipedia.org)
  • He became an active and leading member of the Munka Kör, his partners in socio-photography were among others Sándor Gönci, Árpád Szélpál and Lajos Lengyel, who later became renowned graphic artist and book designer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Studio
  • All four books were produced by the Iger Studio and featured a consistent "house style. (wikipedia.org)
  • With help of Japanese friends he opened and operated his photo studio in Tokyo between 1940 and 42. (wikipedia.org)
  • court
  • the book included court dispositions as well as physical and social characteristics of the delinquents (i.e., physical and mental traits, social backgrounds, and school maladjustments). (wikipedia.org)
  • industry
  • Studios in the minor leagues of the industry, such as Columbia Pictures and Film Booking Offices of America (FBO), focused on exactly those sorts of cheap productions. (wikipedia.org)
  • statistics
  • For the juvenile delinquents, they made attempts to predict criminality using statistics, followed by the likelihood of their rehabilitation upon release. (wikipedia.org)