Loading...
  • 1930's
  • Anzus Economics: Economic Trends and Relations among Australia, New Zealand, and the United States (Praeger Publishers, 1992) online Hawke, G. R. "The Government and the Depression of the 1930's in New Zealand: An Essay Towards a Revision," Australian Economic History Review (1973) 13#1, pp 72-95 Hunter, Ian and Marie Wilson. (wikipedia.org)
  • brings
  • Alan Sweezy described the difference: "But, whereas business-cycle theory treats depression as a temporary, though recurring, phenomenon, the theory of secular stagnation brings out the possibility that depression may become the normal condition of the economy. (wikipedia.org)
  • period
  • He died in 1939, after a period of "depression", and a vaguely unexplained illness. (hubpages.com)
  • The depression years were the period of the highest total factor productivity growth in the United States, primarily to the building of roads and bridges, abandonment of unneeded railroad track and reduction in railroad employment, expansion of electric utilities and improvements wholesale and retail distribution. (wikipedia.org)
  • generally
  • NEW YORK (MarketWatch) - The Bank for International Settlements is warning that years of loose monetary policy have fuelled a dangerous credit bubble, leaving the global economy more vulnerable to another 1930s-style slump is than generally understood, the U.K.'s Telegraph newspaper reported on its website. (marketwatch.com)
  • deal
  • UAB officials were less severe than officials from the Public Assistance Committees , although reports from the Trades Union Congress (TUC) in the 1930s show that there was still a great deal of discontent with the low levels of benefit. (nationalarchives.gov.uk)
  • known
  • The years following the Panic of 1873, known as the Long Depression, were followed by periods of stagnation intermixed with surges of growth until steadier growth resumed around 1896. (wikipedia.org)
  • Crawford's homestead and land (south of the railway) continued to be known as Hill End into the 1930s, when acquired by Thomas R. Cleaver (1868-1948) of Bungarribee. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1920s
  • Since the early 1920s and into the 1930s several prominent inventors, Albert Einstein being one of them, were developing green technologies capable of reducing green house gases long before green house emissions were part of the American psyche. (sub-zerospecialists.com)
  • Then, rather than employing his usual lecture voice, he quietly and passionately talked about his father, a small-town physician in Arkansas and Oklahoma, who worked long hours during the 1920s and 1930s to support his family as well as numerous relatives. (drdarden.com)
  • Joseph Bohomiel Lapchick (April 12, 1900 - August 10, 1970) was a professional basketball player, mostly known for playing with the Original Celtics in the 1920s and 1930s. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Cash Box Kings is an American blues band from Chicago, Illinois, United States, specializing in Chicago-style blues from the 1940s and 1950s as well as Delta blues style music from the 1920s and 1930s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Through the 1920s and 1930s, Washington worked with Julius Rosenwald and architects at the college to develop models for rural schools, to be used with Rosenwald's matching funds to gain construction of more rural schools for black children in the South. (wikipedia.org)
  • Large evaporite, mostly salt deposits accumulated at the south shore were harvested by the local population since the 1920s, but in the 1930s manual collection stopped and the industry shifted northwest to its present center near Garabogaz. (wikipedia.org)
  • mood
  • These episodes are usually separated by periods of "normal" mood, but in some individuals, depression and mania may rapidly alternate, known as rapid cycling. (rachelcowan.com)
  • Scientists then were just learning about the brain's interconnectedness, so he speculated that in stimulating the cortex, he could reach deeper structures involved in depression and other mood disorders. (stanford.edu)
  • work
  • In the beginning of the 1930s, the park was originally made to save a piece of the hill country for the public and to give men, suffering from the depression, work. (wikipedia.org)
  • treat
  • Now a professor of psychiatry, radiology and neuroscience at the Medical University of South Carolina, George became the first U.S. psychiatrist to use the technique, known as transcranial magnetic stimulation, to treat depression. (stanford.edu)
  • Radiosurgery, used to treat tumors, is also being explored at Stanford as a treatment for depression. (stanford.edu)
  • center
  • Neurologist and psychiatrist Mark George, MD, was studying brain imaging and depression in 1990 at London's Queen Square Hospital, a center for neurological diseases renowned for a century as a hotbed of discovery, when he bumped into a man in an elevator with an astonishing report. (stanford.edu)