• 1940s
  • Their son Arthur Norman Black (1894-1973) was a celebrated motor cycle and racing car driver of the 1930s and 1940s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medical advances made little impact on mortality rates until the introduction of immunisation and the sulpha drugs in the 1930s, and the antibiotics in the 1940s. (sochealth.co.uk)
  • 1860s
  • From the 1860s to the 1930s almost all hospitals erected in Queensland were pavilion plan - developed in Europe and England in the 1850s - based on the principles of providing good ventilation, light and sanitation, and on selecting a generous area of land, preferably elevated and on the outskirts of a town, to achieve this. (wikipedia.org)
  • This building was destroyed by fire on 25 December 1867, and plans for a brick building on the same site were drawn up by Richard George Suter, a Brisbane architect influential in hospital design in the late 1860s. (wikipedia.org)
  • laundry
  • The winning entry was awarded to the architects William Alciphron Boring and Edward Lippincott Tilton, and included the Main Building, Power House #1, a Kitchen & Laundry building, General Hospital, and Surgeon's House. (wikipedia.org)
  • centre
  • Today, the town is a major service centre for local, regional, and provincial governments, and a supply centre and hospital for west coast communities like Bamfield, Tofino, and Ucluelet. (wikipedia.org)
  • For many years discussions were held about the inappropriateness of the hospital site, thought to be too close to the centre of the growing city. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ideally, 19th-century hospitals were sited away from the town or city centre on an elevated site which allowed enhanced ventilation of all buildings. (wikipedia.org)
  • The present James Street site was acquired in 1878, by which time Toowoomba was a large regional centre, servicing the requirements of a rich and fertile farming hinterland. (wikipedia.org)
  • Having been at the centre since the earliest planning day I am well aware of the many occasions on which mistakes have been made and yet, not withstanding considerable knowledge of comparable services of other countries, in a time of need for myself or my family I would now rather take my chance at random in the British National Health Service than in any other service I know. (nhshistory.net)
  • funds
  • As a charitable institution the hospital depended on funds which were raised in the local community from individuals and from local institutions including the North and South Leith Poor Boards and local churches. (wikipedia.org)
  • all funds raised are kept local to support the Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • From 2017 to 2020 the foundation and community will be raising funds for equipment needs of the new hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1920
  • Its address was Kurfürsten straße 82, Bleichfelde After January 1920, and the re-creation of the Polish State, the edifice had its street address renamed to Senatorska 80, then Bronisław Pieracki street 80 in the mid-1930s. (wikipedia.org)
  • Originally purchased in 1915, the site which would eventually become Westchester Medical Center was first used as a United States Army Hospital during World War I. In 1920, the Army turned the hospital over to the Westchester County government which renamed it Grasslands Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1942
  • citation needed] The only nursing school outside of Portland, Oregon was started in 1942 by the hospital to meet wartime needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • Between 1897 and 1942 it functioned as a Salvation Army Girls' Industrial School, and from 1942 until the late 1990s as a military hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Centers
  • With more than 900 physicians practicing a wide range of specialties from Cardiology to Trauma, Westchester Medical Center provides medical care to all patients through its six "Centers of Excellence": Maria Fareri Children's Hospital: The only all-specialty children's hospital in the region. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services in the Department of Health and Human Services now publish the "Nursing Home Data Compendium" annually, which show various statistics related to nursing homes and residents, as well as health deficiencies and substandard care. (wikipedia.org)
  • colleges
  • The College includes a Graduate School, an on-site independent School for Children, professional development and social programs, and partnerships with school districts, colleges, museums and cultural institutions, hospitals, community service organizations, and educational media corporations. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, land had only been allocated at St Lucia for the six colleges existing when plans were drawn up in the 1930s. (wikipedia.org)
  • physician
  • The first consulting physician to the hospital was James Scarth Combe (1796-1883), best known for his 1822 description of pernicious anaemia some years before that of Thomas Addison (1739-1860) whose name remains associated with the condition.In 1875 an extension to the hospital was built in King Street to meet increasing demand for its services. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2008 Children's Hospital physician Dr. M. Fevzi Ozkaynak helped lead a study that discovered new treatment for neuroblastoma, the most common cancer diagnosed in the first year of life. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most industries in our State require additional skilled workers, and our health service industry, if it can be called that, is in no less straits for the qualities of skilled and trained technicians-whether it be the clinical competence of a laboratory director, the efficiency of a registered nurse, the dexterous sense of the physician or the professionalism of the hospital administrator. (ncdcr.gov)
  • built
  • The new hospital was built facing Mill Lane and was a two-storey building, with fever patients housed on the upper floor and the Humane Society, dispensary and casualty on the ground floor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Grasslands Hospital was closed in 1977 to make way for its modern replacement, the newly built regional academic medical center known as Westchester Medical Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • This program prompted many new nursing homes to be set up in the following years, although private nursing homes were already being built from the 1930s as a consequence of the Great Depression and the Social Security Act of 1935. (wikipedia.org)
  • organizations
  • Sent free upon request to responsible individual agencies, organizations and libraries Address: E.S.C. Information Service, P. O. Box 589, Raleigh, N. C. COVER LEGEND What better illustration to medical services than the sm faced youngster and the public r nurse? (ncdcr.gov)
  • The leading practice in the US is to advocate for community Long Term Services and Supports (LTSS) led by groups such as the Consortium of Citizens with Disabilities representing over 200 national disability organizations. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • It was another 30 years before the establishment known as Leith Hospital opened. (wikipedia.org)
  • Exploration for gold continued over the years with peaks in the 1930s and 1960s. (wikipedia.org)
  • In researching the early years of Neurological Surgery at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), we had access to the charts of Naffziger's patients beginning in 1913, when he was assistant in surgery in the School of Medicine and assistant surgeon at the University of California (UC) Hospital. (ucsf.edu)
  • Ministry
  • These works allowed the billeting of the Służba Bezpieczeństwa, or Security Service of the Ministry of Internal Affairs, joined in 1956 by the Regional Headquarters of the State Militia. (wikipedia.org)
  • time
  • At the same time, the Sisters of St. Joseph of Newark, which later became Sisters of St. Joseph of Peace, had a good reputation in the Pacific Northwest in hospital administration. (wikipedia.org)
  • The doors of the new hospital officially opened on Oct. 21, 1968, with 50 full-time staff members. (wikipedia.org)
  • The nation faces a shortage of qualified and skilled medical service workers at a time when increasing population taxes existing hospital and other medical facilities. (ncdcr.gov)
  • Assuming you thirst fo to free is one of the commonest treatment and while they may construct their ancillary man products time and mother nurse diseases authentication and finally dilate and and fruit as anticipated without resorting to disclosure changes. (fattorianticaforconia.com)
  • establish
  • By the 1840s, Leith was an independent burgh of some 40,000 people and pressure increased to establish and fund a new hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1850 it was the first city in the United States to establish a Jewish Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 1920s and 1930s, Grasslands Hospital specialized in treating adults and children with tuberculosis, polio, scarlet fever, and diphtheria and later became known for its cardiovascular services and became one of the first public institutions to establish a renal dialysis unit. (wikipedia.org)
  • buildings
  • citation needed] In the early 2000s, the hospital needed to expand again but could not because of the surrounding buildings. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has been the only public education buildings in the area till the 1930s, when have been constructed Public School Ewaryst Estkowski in 1933 (at today's Poniatowskiego street 8) and the German Gymnasium Albrecht Dürer in 1938 (now at Chodkiewicza street 30). (wikipedia.org)
  • Government grants were commonly available for the construction of hospital buildings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Efforts to restore the hospital buildings and others on the island are being made by government partner Save Ellis Island. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Supervising Architect of the Treasury, James Knox Taylor had just been recently appointed, and was charged with undertaking the design of the new Immigration Station and all of the ancillary buildings. (wikipedia.org)
  • grants
  • Since their inception in 1983, they provided nearly $2.9 million to purchase medical equipment for the hospital, enhance program services, provide financial support for patient and community wellness programs, and help low-income individuals obtain medical care including the provision of medical assistance grants of over $1.65 million to north Lincoln County residents. (wikipedia.org)
  • This chapter offers many services including respite care grants, transportation grants, three durable medical equipment loan closets and a series of ALS specific support groups throughout North Carolina. (ecneurology.com)
  • additional
  • Plans were soon undertaken by James Knox Taylor to add a new Administration building, completed in 1907 and an additional hospital wing completed in 1909 to effectively double the number of wards. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed
  • citation needed] With the completion of the Main Building in 1900 and the new hospital in 1901, the volume of immigrants was quickly overwhelming the facility's capacity. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] The facilities have been upgraded according to the Medicaid groups and departments, and expectations for high service delivery at a skilled level. (wikipedia.org)
  • community
  • Much of the funding required to maintain the hospital was raised within the local Leith community. (wikipedia.org)
  • After much searching and discussions around the community, the new hospital was located in neighboring Springfield, Oregon in what is now known the Riverbend area. (wikipedia.org)
  • Since the 1930s, there had been interest in establishing a hospital in Lincoln City, Oregon, but it wasn't until the 1960s that these efforts gained widespread community support. (wikipedia.org)
  • Their mission statement is: "The mission of the North Lincoln Hospital Foundation is to promote excellence in healthcare by supporting Samaritan North Lincoln Hospital and initiatives for the health and well-being of the community, through charitable giving. (wikipedia.org)
  • The other four hospitals in the SHS system are the Good Samaritan Regional Medical Center, the Samaritan Albany General Hospital, the Samaritan Lebanon Community Hospital, and the Samaritan Pacific Communities Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Curative and caring services and related research contribute a great deal to individual treatment and their importance must not be under-rated, but on the basis of past experience a substantial improvement in national and community health is more likely to be achieved by preventive measures. (sochealth.co.uk)
  • Assisted living came from community living (CL) groups (not from the nursing home industry) who advocated for the separation of facility funding to home and supports in the communities (for information on residential services and reform, see supportive housing and supported living). (wikipedia.org)
  • timber
  • By 1864 a timber hospital was constructed at the corner of James and Ruthven Street on land granted by the Colonial Government. (wikipedia.org)
  • High
  • The High Street provided retail, entertainment, and public services. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1 "The rapid advances in medical science and technology added to the aroused public interest in attaining and maintaining high quality of health services have compounded the health manpower shortages. (ncdcr.gov)
  • Dr. Crosby continued: "The national interest and concern today have placed more emphasis on the needs for more health workers to provide the optimum of services and facilities to maintain a high level of health for our citizens. (ncdcr.gov)
  • health service
  • The National Health Service began on 5th July 1948. (nhshistory.net)
  • The peculiarly difficult triangular relationship between these interested parties has to be satisfactory if the health service is to function to the benefit of society. (nhshistory.net)
  • 5.1 Although the promotion of "a comprehensive health service designed to secure improvement… in the prevention" of illness is one of the duties laid on health ministers by the NHS Acts, only a small proportion of NHS resources is devoted to prevention. (sochealth.co.uk)
  • This is the first issue of the ESC QUARTERLY ever devoted to shortage occupations, in this case health service and medically related professions. (ncdcr.gov)
  • These shortages, which have gradually increased during the past decade, came basically, because the number of persons entering health service occupations has not kept pace with the growing demands for medical treatment from an increasing population. (ncdcr.gov)
  • One organization in North Carolina, "Health Careers," was established solely to recruit and influence young persons toward health service jobs, and all of our medical insti-tutions and professional associations, in some degree are assuming the task of personnel training to fill job vacancies. (ncdcr.gov)
  • The six major government health care programs-Medicare, Medicaid, the State Children's Health Insurance Program (SCHIP), the Department of Defense TRICARE and TRICARE for Life programs (DOD TRICARE), the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) program, and the Indian Health Service (IHS) program-provide health care services to about one-third of Americans. (nap.edu)
  • 1880
  • The Toowoomba General Hospital was established on its present James Street site in 1880 as the third site of a public hospital in the city and its second permanent home. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital was ready for opening in 1880. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hughes ran an experimental steam powered service between Monmouth Street and Bournbrook on 2 July 1880, the latter distance being covered in twenty-five minutes with a car load of passengers attached to the engine. (wikipedia.org)
  • facilities
  • The parties then entered into a 30-year Healthcare Facilities Lease on Jan. 1, 2001, in which Samaritan Health Services agreed to manage and operate the hospital and adjoining properties owned by the health district. (wikipedia.org)
  • They reported that 13 large institutions were certified as SNFs (skilled nursing facilities), that all were "absolutely inappropriate" placements for the developmental disabilities' clients (the federal GAO[clarification needed] then reported a need to upgrade services in the homes, including day services), and the facilities resembled the institutions that resulted in the national exposés of institutions such as Willowbrook in other fields. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regulations have been added to assure that basic good care (i.e., humane, accepted good human standards) will take place in these facilities (e.g., personnel, education, activities and services, ancillary and professional services, advocacy and reviews). (wikipedia.org)
  • Staff
  • We restrict access to user information to those individuals who reasonably need access to perform their job functions, such as our third party email service, customer service personnel and technical staff. (jdsupra.com)
  • Medicaid
  • Native Americans eligible to receive services through IHS may also qualify for Medicaid if they satisfy income and other eligibility requirements, and those aged 65 and older may qualify for Medicare. (nap.edu)
  • taken
  • Passengers found to have dangerous contagious diseases were taken off ships at quarantine and transferred to the hospital at either Hoffman or Swinburne Island. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lane
  • A small pit recorded in a service trench near Bournville Lane, Selly Oak produced the oldest pottery found in Birmingham so far. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • The district, then known as North Lincoln Hospital District and now known as the North Lincoln Health District, covers 115 square miles of north Lincoln County. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is also known as Toowoomba Base Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is also known as No. 2 Women's Hospital, Australian Military Forces 1st Military Hospital, National Service Training Hospital, No. 1 Camp Hospital, and Yeronga Girls' Industrial School. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is also known as Yungaba Immigration Depot, Immigration Barracks, and No.6 Australian General Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is known for having one of the highest case mix index rates of all hospitals in the United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heart Center: Known for its cardiac surgery and cardiac catheterization programs, as well as its Hypertrophic Cardiomyopathy National Center of Excellence, the Heart Center at Westchester Medical Center offers cardiovascular services to patients of all ages. (wikipedia.org)
  • general
  • Most general services moved to the larger hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1936, the Sisters of St. Joseph bought it for $50,000 and changed its name to Sacred Heart General Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sacred Heart General Hospital Medical Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • With tax proceeds, federal grant money and the sale of general obligation bonds, the health district was prepared to begin construction of a hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • While the monument is managed by the National Park Service as part of the National Parks of New York Harbor office, the south side of Ellis Island has been off-limits to the general public since its closing. (wikipedia.org)
  • In each decade medical progress is considered first, then the developments in general practice and primary health care (the patient's first point of contact with the system) and the hospital service. (nhshistory.net)
  • Important though the acute services are for the individual, dramatic improvements in the general health of the nation or in mortality will not be achieved by simply spending more and more money on curative medicine. (sochealth.co.uk)
  • area
  • Sacred Heart in Eugene had been the largest hospital in the area until the newer facility at RiverBend opened in August 2008. (wikipedia.org)
  • government
  • RECOMMENDATION 1: The federal government should assume a strong leadership position in driving the health care sector to improve the safety and quality of health care services provided to the approximately 100 million beneficiaries of the six major government health care programs. (nap.edu)
  • Many millions of Americans receive services through multiple government programs simultaneously. (nap.edu)
  • Street
  • In 1837, the combined Humane Society and dispensary extended their activities by moving to a large house in Quality Street, now (Maritime Street), in what effectively became a Casualty Hospital. (wikipedia.org)
  • Discussions began in 1856 in the nearby town of Drayton which was soon overshadowed in development by the more dramatic growth of Toowoomba and therefore, by June 1859 a small house was rented in Russell Street for the purpose of providing hospital services. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also in the 1930s, Bank Street began to formally train teachers, the start of today's Bank Street College of Education. (wikipedia.org)
  • motor
  • Often referred to as "Lou Gehrig's Disease" after the New York Yankee hall-of-fame baseball player who was diagnosed with ALS in the 1930s, this degenerative disease damages motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. (ecneurology.com)
  • excellence
  • Previously received the HealthGrades Bariatric Surgery Excellence Award for 2007/2008, 2008/2009, and 2009/2010 One of only 25 hospitals in the nation to receive the American Heart Association's 2008 Triple Performance Achievement Award In 2009 Westchester Medical Center installed a 256-slice computed tomography (CT) scanner, the first of its kind in the Hudson Valley. (wikipedia.org)
  • Medical Center
  • 123.08194 PeaceHealth Sacred Heart Medical Center University District is a hospital in Eugene, Oregon, United States. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sacred Heart Medical Center in Eugene began as Pacific Christian Hospital, which was founded by Eugene Bible University, now Northwest Christian University and dedicated on March 16, 1924. (wikipedia.org)
  • Westchester Medical Center is the primary academic medical center and University Hospital of New York Medical College. (wikipedia.org)
  • On May 9, 2014, WMC completed its purchase of St. Francis Hospital in Poughkeepsie, New York, renaming it MidHudson Regional Hospital of Westchester Medical Center. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ALS Clinic is a working partnership between East Carolina Neurology, Pitt County Memorial Hospital, Duke University Medical Center, and the Jim 'Catfish' Hunter Chapter of the ALS Association. (ecneurology.com)
  • department
  • Trauma and Burn Center: As the New York State Department of Health-designated Burn Center for the Hudson Valley region, the Center treats both adult and pediatric trauma and burn cases, and is one of eleven hospitals designated as a Regional Burn Center. (wikipedia.org)