• 1910
  • In 1910, he was transferred to the Second University Hospital of Vienna, where he devoted himself to developing surgical techniques for the treatment of uterine prolapse. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1950s
  • Cell culture techniques were advanced significantly in the 1940s and 1950s to support research in virology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Her elegantly written and well-documented narrative demonstrates how, within 20th-century biological laboratories, a whole range of vessels and containers were used in order to store, breed, study, and manipulate cells and tissue outside the body of organic [End Page individuals: from hanging-drop preparations in the 1910s to tissue culture flasks in the 1930s and powerful freezers in the 1950s and 1960s. (jhu.edu)
  • During the 1950s and the 1960s cell culture was growing in use, increasing production of various containers, media composition and accessories for handling fluids, concentrating cells, isolating organelles, developing staining methods and labels for identifying specific molecules (markers) and more. (celartia.com)
  • agar
  • In 1908, Margaret Reed researched in Berlin in Max Hartmann's lab where she performed probably the first in vitro mammalian cell culture with guinea pig bone marrow by explanting the bone marrow and placing it into a nutrient-rich agar produced by fellow lab researcher Rhoda Erdmann and incubating the sample. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also, he discovered that gonococcus grows best on a culture of agar mixed with human blood serum. (wikipedia.org)
  • In microbiology research, agar - a plant-based goo similar to gelatin and made from seaweed - is extensively used as culture medium. (blogspot.com)
  • Cultivation
  • Thomas Huckle Weller was an American physician, microbiologist and virologist who was a co-recipient of the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine in 1954 (which shared with John Enders and Frederick Robbins ) for the successful cultivation of poliomyelitis virus in tissue cultures. (todayinsci.com)
  • reproductive
  • As Paul Rabinow does in Making PCR: A Story of Biotechnology (1996), Landecker poses the question of how today's cell manipulations-from cloning techniques to stem cell research and reproductive medicine-have altered our understanding and experience of life. (jhu.edu)
  • subsequently
  • Mikimoto Kōkichi (御木本 幸吉, 25 January 1858 - 21 September 1954) was a Japanese entrepreneur who is credited with creating the first cultured pearl and subsequently starting the cultured pearl industry with the establishment of his luxury pearl company Mikimoto. (wikipedia.org)
  • lymph
  • This operation involved removal of the uterus, parametrium, tissues surrounding the upper vagina, and pelvic lymph nodes, but leaving the ovaries intact. (wikipedia.org)
  • embryos
  • In her work with chick embryos, Margaret Lewis studied connective tissue formation within the tissues as well as outside of an environment where factors involved in coagulation are present. (wikipedia.org)
  • refers
  • Culturing Life points to biological research practices in the lab, but at the same time it refers to our contemporary culture that, in more than one way, refers to and relies on developments in the life sciences. (jhu.edu)
  • biologists
  • As a result, this couple's greatest impact on embryology and cell biology in the twentieth century was teaching later generations of biologists the basic factors involved in tissue culture based on what they had learned from their research. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumors
  • With the exception of some derived from tumors, most primary cell cultures have limited lifespan. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1907 a bacterium that caused plant tumors, Agrobacterium tumefaciens, had been discovered and in the early 1970s it was found that the bacteria inserted its DNA into plants using a Ti plasmid. (wikipedia.org)
  • grown
  • The tissue grown in this medium was prepared in a method that become known as the "Lewis Culture" where the tissue bits were put into a hanging drop on the underside of a thin glass slip. (wikipedia.org)
  • With so many avenues opened by cell culture to explore, Margaret Lewis and her husband diverged in their area of study, with Margaret Lewis choosing to focus on microbiological problems, which involved close observations of chick embryo intestines reacting to typhoid bacilli in the medium in which it was grown. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hybridomas can be grown indefinitely in a suitable cell culture medium. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thomas Huckle
  • This vaccine was made possible by the cell culture research of John Franklin Enders, Thomas Huckle Weller, and Frederick Chapman Robbins, who were awarded a Nobel Prize for their discovery of a method of growing the virus in monkey kidney cell cultures. (wikipedia.org)
  • cellular
  • A cellular construction was first detected in some plant tissues by the British scientist R. Hooke (1665) using a microscope. (thefreedictionary.com)
  • Dr. Barbera and Dr. Forteza regularly contribute topical Biology articles and news associated with cellular physiology, cellular pathology, cell culture, materials, equipment, methodologies and research. (celartia.com)
  • Cell culture turned into basic tool, mainly a routine to produce molecules and a background for testing molecular relations, tumor development and cellular interactions. (celartia.com)
  • Yamato M, Konno C et al (2000) Release of adsorbed fibronectin from temperature-responsive culture surfaces requires cellular activity. (springer.com)
  • fragments
  • In 1913, E. Steinhardt, C. Israeli, and R. A. Lambert grew vaccinia virus in fragments of guinea pig corneal tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • method
  • Mikimoto had received a patent in 1896 for producing hemispherical pearls, or mabes, and a 1908 patent for culturing in mantle tissue, but he could not use the Mise-Nishikawa method without invalidating his own patents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Williams developed a new and fast method for preparing and staining brain tissue to show the presence of Negri bodies. (wikipedia.org)
  • methods
  • Since Haberlandt's original assertions, methods for tissue and cell culture have been realized, leading to significant discoveries in biology and medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1907, when the American Public Health Association established a committee on the standard methods for the diagnosis of rabies, they named Williams chair of the committee in recognition of her expertise. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several tissue culture methods which measure the rate of chemical absorption by the skin have been approved by the OECD. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are a few different methods used by the various artists to shape their trees, which share a common heritage with other artistic horticultural and agricultural practices, such as pleaching, bonsai, espalier, and topiary, and employing some similar techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • These methods use a variety of horticultural and arboricultural techniques to achieve an intended design. (wikipedia.org)
  • medium
  • Aside from temperature and gas mixture, the most commonly varied factor in culture systems is the cell growth medium. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the major difficulty of the reliable cell culture was not the composition of the medium, it was the contamination, either bacterial, fungal or by yeast. (celartia.com)
  • The selective culture medium is called HAT medium because it contains hypoxanthine, aminopterin and thymidine. (wikipedia.org)
  • reputation
  • He publicly burnt tons of low-quality pearls as a publicity stunt to establish a reputation that the Mikimoto company only sold high-quality cultured pearls. (wikipedia.org)
  • growth
  • Loeffler's best-known work is the elucidation of the characteristics of the diphtheria bacillus and its growth in pure culture (1884), which again clearly revealed the imprint of Koch, with whom he was then so closely associated. (encyclopedia.com)
  • processes
  • English inventions and discoveries are objects, processes or techniques invented, innovated or discovered, partially or entirely, in England by a person from England (that is, someone born in England - including to non-English parents - or born abroad with at least one English parent and who had the majority of their education or career in England). (wikipedia.org)
  • biotechnology
  • One complication of these blood-derived ingredients is the potential for contamination of the culture with viruses or prions, particularly in medical biotechnology applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Genetic engineering is the direct manipulation of an organism's genome using certain biotechnology techniques that have only existed since the 1970s. (wikipedia.org)
  • bone
  • Osteoblasts play an essential role in bone physiology through their participation in bone formation and turnover and in bone tissue repair. (medsci.org)