• origins
  • The hospital is known for having sheltered Jews during the Holocaust by diagnosing them with a fictitious disease called "Syndrome K". The origins of the hospital on the Tiber Island date to before 1000 CE, when an ancient temple dedicated to the Greek god of medicine, Asclepius, was replaced by a sanctuary dedicated to Bartholomew the Apostle, one of the Twelve Apostles of Jesus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The product of the amalgamation of the University of Ballarat and the Gippsland Campus of Monash University in 2014, the University has its earliest origins as the Ballarat School of Mines in 1870. (wikipedia.org)
  • Church
  • Adriano Ossicini, 2016 Initially, the hospital was used as a hospice on the premises of the San Giovanni Calibita Church. (wikipedia.org)
  • On new property on K Street, purchased by the church, the architect Philip H. Frohman was engaged to design a new building. (wikipedia.org)
  • Its "Midnight Mass" of 1870 was perhaps the first in the United States in an Anglican church. (wikipedia.org)
  • Samuel Hopkins and his uncle, Thomas Hill, both staunch Anglicans, took religious leadership in the community and were responsible for the creation of St. Peter's Church in 1804. (wikipedia.org)
  • Initially the Institute was concerned predominantly with the preparation of primary teachers for Catholic schools, but by 1980 it had accredited courses concerned with post-primary education, nursing, religious education and church music, among others. (wikipedia.org)
  • Constructed between 1870 and 1875 to meet the needs of Semarang's growing Catholic population, the red-brick church building was designed by the Dutch architect W. I. van Bakel and built at a cost of 110,000 gulden. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mission
  • The organization started as a dispensary along the Yamuna River in Delhi, but over time developed into a mission, which was then established as St. Stephen's Hospital for Women and Children, a hospital that remains in operation today. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mission statement was both medical and religious-the DFMM was to be "a medical mission among the native women on Delhi, with the double objective of alleviating much physical suffering, and of taking a knowledge of Christianity to them in their secluded homes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Between December 1870 and October 1871, the Mission made 1,446 visits to 191 different patients in their zenanas. (wikipedia.org)
  • The East End Juvenile Mission was established and in 1870 he started his first 'home' in a rented house in Stepney Causeway. (plymouthbrethren.org)
  • English
  • 7 February 1812 - 9 June 1870) was an English writer and social critic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Historians often point out that in the First British Empire (before the 1780s) there was no single imperial vision, but rather a multiplicity of private operations led by different groups of English businessmen or religious groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • Health
  • The hospital was recognized by the Special Commission of Health during the 1832 cholera outbreaks in Rome. (wikipedia.org)
  • By 1870, in ill health and unable to repay his debt when it came due, he was forced in extremis to seek extra funds by translating for Sampson Low, who were in the process of printing a religious book of his. (wikipedia.org)
  • conduct
  • While the symptoms of the disease were deliberately kept ambiguous, the Nazis were noted to refrain from investigating the hospital or even to conduct searches for Jews on the premises out of fear of contracting the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • help
  • Later, it was expanded into a modern hospital by Dr. Giovanni Borromeo, who joined in 1934, with the help of Father Maurizio Bialek. (wikipedia.org)
  • brought
  • With the Nazi occupation of Italy in September 1943 and the imposition of antisemitic laws against the Roman Jews, Sacerdoti - with the approval of Borromeo and Bialek - brought patients from the Jewish hospital to be cared for at Fatebenefratelli. (wikipedia.org)
  • judge
  • 31 December - Chartres Brew, Gold commissioner, Chief Constable and judge in the Colony of British Columbia (died 1870). (wikipedia.org)
  • Henry Cary (12 February 1804 - 30 June 1870) was a barrister, classical scholar, Anglican clergyman, and first District Court Judge in the Colony of New South Wales. (wikipedia.org)
  • built
  • Built in 1870 as part of the Brigham City Manufacturing and Mercantile Association, the mill produced high-quality blankets and sweaters from locally produced wool fleeces. (wikipedia.org)
  • England
  • Relieved of his position by the Governing Board in 1861, he then became Chaplain at the Chapel of the Foundling Hospital, then one of the most important charitable institutions in England. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Foundling Hospital was the first public charity in England, established in 1739 by a Royal Charter granted by King George II and Queen Caroline. (wikipedia.org)
  • site
  • The town is also the site of Queen Victoria Hospital, where famed plastic surgeon Archibald McIndoe treated burns victims of World War II and formed the Guinea Pig Club. (wikipedia.org)
  • women
  • In 1809, Elizabeth Ann Seton established a religious order of women in Emmitsburg, Maryland, based on the rule drawn up by Vincent de Paul for Louise de Marillac's Daughters of Charity. (wikipedia.org)
  • local
  • Ty-Mawr remained in the ownership of The Blaenavon Coal and Iron Company and following the death of Kennard, was used by the Directors of the Blaenavon Company as a hunting lodge until 1924, when it became a hospital supported by the subscriptions of local people (an early form of NHS). (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • In 1867 at the age of 22 she became part of the Ladies of Saint Catherine of Portoria and visited patients of the Pammatone hospital. (wikipedia.org)