• 1841
  • Pisa, 1841) Lezioni sui fenomeni fisico-chimici dei corpi viventi (Pisa, 1844) Manuale di telegrafia electrica (Pisa, 1850) Cours spécial sur l'induction, le magnétisme de rotation, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1841 his work Verhandeling over Vondel en Shakespear als Treurspeldichters was awarded a gold medal by Teylers Tweede Genootschap (Teylers Second or Scientific society) and he became main editor of Konst- en Letterbode until 1853 (following the sudden death of the previous main editor, Vincent Loosjes). (wikipedia.org)
  • At Yale, he, along with William Kingsley, publisher of The New Englander, and eleven others, founded the senior or secret society Scroll and Key and incorporated the Kingsley Trust Association in 1841. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hoping for an academic career, he submitted a dissertation entitled "The Difference Between the Democritean and Epicurean Philosophies of Nature"to the University of Jena in 1841 and was awarded the doctorate. (encyclopedia.com)
  • 1847
  • In 1847 he planned, and in 1850 founded, the Bombay Reformatory School of Industry for the reformation and education of Indian children, of which he was superintendent, under the patronage of the governor, Lord Elphinstone. (wikipedia.org)
  • He published in 1844 a paper On the Arrangement of an Observatory for Practical Astronomy and Meteorology, and in 1847 a brief History of the New Planets. (wikipedia.org)
  • Following the Cambridge custom, he was awarded an M.A. without further study, in 1847. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1844 he became a professor at Delaware College and remained there until 1847 when he moved to Germany to study at the University of Giessen under Justus von Liebig. (wikipedia.org)
  • He eventually found work in September 1844 as a railway surveyor based in Manchester and Halifax until he was enticed in August 1847 to join the staff of Queenwood School in Hampshire, which offered a unique and practically based approach to education in the sciences. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • On the death of his wife in 1847, he accepted a professorship at the Lawrence Scientific School of Harvard University, where he continued to teach until his death. (encyclopedia.com)
  • 1849
  • Other works include:- Geology of Bombay (1863) Annals of India for the Year 1848 (1849) Manual of Physical Research Adapted for India (1852) Floods in India of 1849 (1850) http://standrews-kirriemuir.org.uk/download/history/The_Illustrious_Life_of_the_Reverend_Dr_John_Buist.pdf Stephen, Leslie, ed. (1886). (wikipedia.org)
  • Asiatic or genuine cholera returned to Europe in 1837 and 1849 with ready transfer to North America, and only in 1883 would induce determined scientific-bacteriologic resolution. (victorianweb.org)
  • 1827
  • Its aims were to instruct local mechanics and tradesmen in scientific principles relating to their work, through lectures and a circulation library, which by 1827 contained over 700 volumes. (wikipedia.org)
  • prize
  • In 1837 Buist was awarded a prize by the Highland Society of Scotland for a paper Geology of the South-eastern portion of Perthshire. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Society of Arts, of which he was a member, voted Lawson a silver medal for the invention of an observing-chair called "Reclinea", and awarded him a prize for a new thermometer-stand, described before the British Association in 1845. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is the namesake of the John Addison Porter Prize and was a founder of the Scroll and Key senior society of Yale University. (wikipedia.org)
  • The John Addison Porter Prize, established in 1872, is a prize at Yale University awarded annually to the best work of scholarship in any field "where it is possible, through original effort, to gather and relate facts or principles, or both, and to present the results in such a literary form as to make the product of general human interest. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Lalande Prize (French: Prix Lalande) was an award for scientific advances in astronomy, given from 1802 until 1970 by the French Academy of Sciences. (wikipedia.org)
  • The prize was endowed by astronomer Jérôme Lalande in 1801, a few years before his death in 1807, to enable the Academy of Sciences to make an annual award "to the person who makes the most unusual observation or writes the most useful paper to further the progress of Astronomy, in France or elsewhere. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the same time, they continued to offer premiums for the finest examples of farm products and techniques, and became involved in the many county and local agricultural societies and fairs that formed in the nineteenth century, mainly through offering prizes and prize monies to them. (masshist.org)
  • work
  • In 1868, he published his most important scientific work, Thesaurus Siluricus, being a list of all the fossils which occur in the Silurian formation across the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Before the end of the year, Lapham had published a Catalogue of Plants and Shells, Found in the vicinity of Milwaukee, on the West Side of Lake Michigan, perhaps the first scientific work published west of the Great Lakes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Calori produced a great volume of scientific work. (wikipedia.org)
  • He is noted for his involvement in the early history of a number of learned societies, for his hydrographic charts, for his astronomical work, and for a wide range of publications and translations. (wikipedia.org)
  • honors
  • He was also awarded the honors of Knight and Commander of the Order of the Crown of Italy, Knight of the Order of Guadalupe in the Mexican Empire and Knight of the Civil Order of Savoy. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1833
  • The society was founded in 1833 as the Entomological Society of London. (wikipedia.org)
  • The foundation of the society began with a meeting of "gentlemen and friends of entomological science", held on 3 May 1833 in the British Museum convened by Nicholas Aylward Vigors with the presidency of John George Children. (wikipedia.org)
  • The real date of the foundation of the society was more probably on 22 May 1833, when the members met in Thatched House Tavern, on St James's Street. (wikipedia.org)
  • early
  • He displayed a talent for scientific observation early on while working on the canals and their locks himself, producing drawings that he could sell at the age of thirteen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Early modern "chymistry" also questions the grand narrative of the scientific revolution, with Galileo Galilei's (1564 - 1642) and Robert Boyle's (1627 - 1691) mechanical philosophy whisking away the alchemical tradition. (encyclopedia.com)
  • professorship
  • In 1801, the Society voted to establish a professorship of natural history at Harvard, which served as the origin of the Botanical Garden at Cambridge. (masshist.org)
  • Institution
  • In 1825 there was an attempt to set up a Scientific and Mechanics Institution in the town. (wikipedia.org)
  • The continued prosperity of the institution during the 1860s has been attributed to two main developments - the demand for more technical and scientific education, and the introduction of an examination system by the newly formed national Department of Science and Art. (wikipedia.org)
  • New Equipment Added Members of the Presbyterian Hos- pital Society who braved sub-zero weather to attend the 53rd annual meet- ing of the society on January 23, learned from reports submitted that the institution had increased considerably the scope of its service to the sick dur- ing the year 1935. (archive.org)
  • 1872
  • Klaas Sybrandi (Haarlem, 18 November 1807 - Haarlem, 4 September 1872), also spelled as Sijbrandi, was a Dutch Mennonite minister, author, translator and involved with several societies and foundations. (wikipedia.org)
  • records
  • Buist drew up the Bombay Observatory Report for 1844, which contained records of 170,000 observations. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • Subsequently he did not go into in business, but concentrated on scientific study. (wikipedia.org)
  • His book Hereditary Genius (1869) was the first social scientific attempt to study genius and greatness. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Royal Entomological Society is devoted to the study of insects. (wikipedia.org)
  • He published in 1850, from Newington Butts, a short paper, and Barlow's whole subsequent life seems to have been consecrated to further study of Dante. (wikipedia.org)
  • The story of why Tyndall felt compelled to turn down this considerable honour sheds light on the scientific politics and personal relationships of the time, on the importance given to the study of magnetism, and on Tyndall's own character and career. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • paper
  • For his Paper "on the Investigation of the Orbits of Revolving Double Stars," inserted in the Fifth Volume of the Memoirs of the Royal Astronomical Society. (wikipedia.org)
  • short
  • As the initiator of scientific meteorology, he devised the first weather map, proposed a theory of anticyclones, and was the first to establish a complete record of short-term climatic phenomena on a European scale. (wikipedia.org)
  • London
  • It had many antecedents beginning as the Society of Entomologists of London. (wikipedia.org)
  • They decided that a society should be created for the promotion of the science of entomology in its various branches and it should be called the Entomological Society of London. (wikipedia.org)
  • A publication commenced in November 1834 under the title Transactions of Entomological Society of London. (wikipedia.org)
  • London Anthropological Society 1875, p. 104. (wikipedia.org)
  • London Anthropological Society (1875). (wikipedia.org)
  • Ada Byron, as she was then called, was born in London on December 10, 1815 to recently married high-society parents. (stephenwolfram.com)
  • She finally recovered in time to follow the custom for society girls of the period: on turning 17 she went to London for a season of socializing. (stephenwolfram.com)
  • development
  • The first Secretary, Robert Neil, was appointed in 1844, and acted not just as a Secretary but as a teacher-supervisor, influencing the formative development of the organisation. (wikipedia.org)
  • great
  • Bigsby of Suffolk & Nottinghamshire - Burkes Landed Gentry of Great Britain, 1850 Obituary of Dr J.J. Bigsby Chisholm 1911. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • In view of these many technical achievements and the demands of running such a large business, it is remarkable that Mallet still found time for scientific research in the most varied fields. (encyclopedia.com)
  • president
  • J.G. Children became the first president and William Kirby (1759-1850) was made honorary president for life. (wikipedia.org)
  • The following year, three of the four most responsible for the society were replaced: Edward Newman (1801-1876) took the place of J.O. Westwood as president, Samuel Stevens (1817-1899) took the place of W Yarrell as treasurer and W Wing the place of H.T. Stainton as secretary. (wikipedia.org)
  • The society is governed by its council, which is chaired by the society's president, according to a set of by-laws. (wikipedia.org)
  • among
  • Although Talbot counted Wheatstone, Brewster, and Babbage among his scientific friends, he most closely followed the ideas of his friend John Herschel on light. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Second
  • When Captain Horatio Austin was appointed to command HMS Resolute during the Franklin search expedition in February 1850, he chose his friend Ommanney as second in command. (wikipedia.org)
  • closely
  • The financial crisis of 1825-1826 led to the failure of the institution's bankers, and it faltered and later became part of the Huddersfield Philosophical Society, an organisation with which its rules now more closely aligned. (wikipedia.org)
  • book
  • In 1844 Lapham published the first substantial book on the geography of the Wisconsin Territory. (wikipedia.org)
  • year
  • In this year, the society moved from its building at 17, Old Bond Street to 12, Bedford Row. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2 After a review in 1850, the pattern settled down to the award of one in the physical sciences and one in the biological sciences for 'the two most important contributions to the advancement of Natural Knowledge published originally in Her Majesty's dominions within a period of not more than 10 years and not less than 1 year of the date of the award. (royalsocietypublishing.org)
  • The year 1816 marked the first Cattle Show sponsored by the Society on their grounds in Brighton designated for that purpose. (masshist.org)
  • whose
  • Both Erasmus Darwin and Samuel Galton were founding members of the famous Lunar Society of Birmingham, whose members included Boulton, Watt, Wedgwood, Priestley, Edgeworth, and other distinguished scientists and industrialists. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Society's raison d'etre as stated in their petition for incorporation was to join the ranks of the agricultural societies in Britain and America "whose particular business is to make experiments themselves and invite others thereto on the subject of agriculture. (masshist.org)
  • time
  • and most of them also appeared at the time in the Italian scientific journals. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was cousin of Douglas Strutt Galton and half-cousin of Charles Darwin and both families boasted Fellows of the Royal Society and members who loved to invent in their spare time. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • First he attended Latin school in Haarlem, and was then, 17 years of age, admitted 'with high expectations' at the Kweekschool der algemeene Doopsgezinde Societeit te Amsterdam (Seminary of the General Mennonite Society in Amsterdam) where he developed an affection for classical literature - supposedly larger than his interest in theology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the methods have differed somewhat over the years, the Society has never strayed from this original intention of encouraging agricultural pursuits and experiments designed to advance agricultural technology and disseminate information. (masshist.org)
  • Children
  • From 1850 until 1873 she raised Agassiz's three children by his first wife and acted as a constant companion in the writing, exploration, and interpretation of natural history. (encyclopedia.com)
  • University
  • Because university education was expensive, the vast majority of physicians were from the successful middle orders of society. (encyclopedia.com)
  • Mid-Career Researcher Award Winner, Kristi Anseth, Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, the Biofrontiers Institute, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute, University of Colorado at Boulder. (wisc.edu)
  • Order
  • For his services to the Turkish government he was awarded the Order of Nishan Iftikhar (Order of Glory). (wikipedia.org)
  • For his services in defending Sicily Smyth was subsequently awarded the Order of Saint Ferdinand and of Merit by King Ferdinand I of the Two Sicilies, and received permission from the Prince Regent to wear it on 16 March 1816. (wikipedia.org)
  • life
  • H.T. Stainton, who was involved more and more in the life of the society, seemed to have some problems working with E.M. Janson. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Nathan Strong (1781-1837) published An inaugural dissertation on the disease termed Petechial, or Spotted Fever and presented his findings to the Connecticut Medical Society. (victorianweb.org)
  • gold
  • It has made teaching quality a particular focus of its activities, winning the inaugural Higher Education Academy Global Teaching Excellence Award, and achieving a Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) Gold Award, both in 2017. (wikipedia.org)
  • members
  • American Antiquarian Society Members Directory "Increase A. Lapham born March 7, 1811 died Sept. 14, 1875. (wikipedia.org)
  • Galton's aunt Mary Anne Galton wrote on aesthetics and religion, and her notable autobiography detailed the unique environment of her childhood populated by Lunar Society members. (wikipedia.org)
  • In September 1834, the society numbered 117 honorary members and 10 full members. (wikipedia.org)