• pilgrimage
  • As the group of unreturnable refugees in Norway has risen over recent years, churches have again become places for public appeals for these groups, through hunger strikes, tents camped as protest at the walls of central churches, and asylum marches following old pilgrimage paths. (blogspot.ca)
  • 1982
  • In May 1982, Asp's three sons and daughter along with eight members of Hjemkomst crew decided to sail Hjemkomst to Norway, which was Asp's original dream. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ship departed New York City on June 8, 1982 and arrived in Bergen, Norway 19 July and on August 9, 1982 the ship arrived in Oslo. (wikipedia.org)
  • replica
  • Hjemkomst Center first opened in 1985 and serves as a home to Hjemkomst Viking Ship, Hopperstad Stave Church replica, quarterly museum exhibits, and county archives. (wikipedia.org)
  • The ship is a full-scale replica of the Gokstad Viking ship that was discovered in Norway in 1880. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2017
  • On 27 May 2016, Stortinget approved a new act to establish the Church of Norway as an independent legal entity rather than a branch of the civil service, and the law took effect on 1 January 2017. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Church of Norway was subject to legislation, including its budgets, passed by the Storting, and its central administrative functions were carried out by the Royal Ministry of Government Administration, Reform and Church Affairs until the 2017. (wikipedia.org)
  • An act approved in 2016 created the Church of Norway as an independent legal entity, effective from 1 January 2017. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sunday February 12th 2017. (alan-neale.com)
  • King of Nor
  • Until 2012 the constitutional head of the church was the King of Norway, who is obliged to profess himself a Lutheran. (wikipedia.org)
  • After many difficulties he was elected King of Norway, and made it his object to extirpate heathenism and make the Christian religion the basis of his kingdom. (orthodoxwiki.org)
  • This was willingly given, whereupon Olaf was expelled and Canute elected King of Norway. (orthodoxwiki.org)
  • reformation
  • The Lutheran reformation in Denmark-Norway in 1536-1537 broke ties with the Holy See and resulted in a state church intimately integrated with the state and completely subject to royal authority, with the King as its head. (wikipedia.org)
  • Before the Protestant Reformation in 1536, Norwegians were part of the Catholic Church. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sweden
  • In 1800 King Gustav IV of Sweden was crowned in the Church of Saint Olof. (wikipedia.org)
  • Norway shares some Nordic dance music tradition with its neighbouring countries of Sweden and Denmark, where the most typical instrument is the fiddle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Exports fell dramatically--about 20%--also due to the devaluation of trading partners' currencies, especially those of Sweden, Norway, and the U.K. In 2010 exports regained some of the loss with 10% growth. (traveldocs.com)
  • nave
  • The church was originally a family chapel consisting of the nave and chancel, but it has been refurbished several times over the centuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • monastic
  • The ban on Catholicism within Norway was lifted in 1843, while the ban on monastic orders were formally lifted in 1897. (wikipedia.org)
  • Denmark
  • The first trace of the city's name is from 1283, when Sophia of Denmark donated her rights of salmon fishing to the Skänninge monastery. (wikipedia.org)
  • Though physiographically a part of the continent of North America , Greenland has been politically associated with Europe (specifically Denmark-Norway ) for about a millennium. (thefullwiki.org)
  • site
  • Over the years, Dahle converted the site into a living history museum, creating an idealized folk version of Norway. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tanum Church is surrounded by a cemetery that has been burial site since pre-Christian times. (wikipedia.org)
  • relatively
  • Unfortunately, we know relatively little about old religious practices in Norway or elsewhere as most of the knowledge was lost in the gradual Christianisation. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is recognized that works of art in unheated churches often remain in relatively good condition over centuries, while rapid signs of degradation are observed after heating has been introduced [ 2 ]. (mdpi.com)
  • State
  • Church building has been influenced by the role of the State or the Crown. (wikipedia.org)
  • Until the modern era, the Church of Norway was not only a religious organisation but also one of the most important instruments of royal power and official authority, and an important part of the state administration, especially at the local and regional levels. (wikipedia.org)
  • The church remains state funded. (wikipedia.org)
  • The church was probably designed by Jørgen Wiggers, the Councillor of the State (etatsråd). (wikipedia.org)
  • The Church of Norway will still obtain financial support from the state of Norway, along with other religious communities. (wikipedia.org)
  • The U.S. state of Alabama has a population roughly equal to that of Norway, but church attendance in Alabama is as much as 11 times higher than in Norway. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although there are other denominations, the Church of Norway is the leading one and receives State support. (blogspot.ca)
  • As either a partner or a rival of the government, the Church of Norway has helped to make public policy: first, the postwar expansion of the welfare state and, later, the boycotts against South Africa. (blogspot.ca)
  • A second reason is the relative dominance of one State-supported church and the unthinking adherence of most Scandinavians, even atheists, to the Lutheran tradition. (blogspot.ca)
  • people
  • The reason why there are not more people in going into church may well be the faces of those people going out of church. (alan-neale.com)
  • A study in Norway found that people with a strong sense of humor outlived those who don't laugh as much. (alan-neale.com)
  • county
  • For instance, in Hordaland there were subdivisions as one fourth ("fjordung" or "fjerding") or one eight ("åttung") of a county, each with its own main church. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1960s
  • During the 1960s, there were many municipal mergers across Norway due to the work of the Schei Committee. (wikipedia.org)
  • Norse
  • The Christians in Norway often established churches or other holy sites at places that had previously been sacred under the Norse religion. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • The same drawings were often used for more than one church. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each church has largely been regarded as an independent public institution ("self-owned"), often with its own assets and land from which it obtained ground lease. (wikipedia.org)
  • place
  • By reframing immigration in moral terms, the Church made it that much harder to place limits on it, since morality is normally perceived in absolute terms, e.g., murder is always wrong, and not wrong within limits ( Lippert and Rehaag, 2013, pp. 126-129 ). (blogspot.ca)