• Resuscitation
  • Research by Ola Didrik Saugstad and others led to new international guidelines on newborn resuscitation in 2010, recommending the use of normal air instead of 100% oxygen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alongside efforts to strengthen maternal and fetal safety through detection of problems in the antenatal period, monitoring during labour and delivery [ 1 ], and ensuring access to immediate newborn resuscitation where needed, a need has been recognised for tools to support clinical decision making and care. (biomedcentral.com)
  • babies
  • As a result, an estimated 2.6 million stillbirths, 2.7 million neonatal deaths and 303,000 maternal deaths occur globally each year, signaling a major gap in interventions specifically around childbirth and the early postnatal period â€" a time when mothers and babies are most vulnerable and global progress in reducing mortality has been particularly poor. (issuu.com)
  • More than 80% of neonatal deaths are in preterm or small for gestational age babies in high burden countries. (issuu.com)
  • and practices such as skin to skin contact between mother and newborn babies and exclusive breastfeeding for the first six months of life. (unicef.org)
  • infections
  • The clinical manifestations of newborn infections vary and include subclinical infection, mild to severe manifestations of focal or systemic infection, and, rarely, congenital syndromes resulting from in utero infection(5). (medicaljb.com)
  • South Africa
  • Garrib et al in 2006 found high levels of baby HA14-1 mortality in another rural section of South Africa, 67.5 per 1000 person-years, with HIV/AIDS approximated as the single largest reason behind loss of life in the under-5 age-group (41% of fatalities) . (aksumuniversity.org)
  • 1990
  • However, sub-Saharan Africa has shown remarkable acceleration in its progress, with the annual rate of reduction in deaths increasing from 0.8 per cent in 1990 -1995 to 4.1 per cent in 2005-2012. (unicef.org)
  • In 2013 it was estimated to have resulted in 644,000 deaths down from 874,000 deaths in 1990. (wikipedia.org)
  • infants
  • There has long been a scientific debate over whether newborn infants with asphyxia should be resuscitated with 100% oxygen or normal air. (wikipedia.org)
  • According to statistics by world health organization (WHO), in developing countries 3% of infants (3.6 million people) suffer from moderate to severe asphyxia, of whom 23% (840,000) die, and almost the same number suffer from the associated consequences ( 2 ). (tums.pub)
  • oxygen
  • It has been demonstrated that high concentrations of oxygen lead to generation of oxygen free radicals, which have a role in reperfusion injury after asphyxia. (wikipedia.org)
  • consequences
  • Although the majority of these disorders are transient, the long-term consequences of asphyxia may affect the central nervous system (CNS), which can ultimately lead to cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and learning disabilities ( 2 , 3 ). (tums.pub)
  • Malnutrition and its consequences are large contributors to deaths and disabilities worldwide. (wikipedia.org)