Ask a Question:


What is the best treatment for Spinal Epidural lipomatosis?


My husband was recently diagnosed with Spinal Epidural Lipamatosis. We were steroid shots were a small possibility but surgery was the most likely solution. Any other possibilities or what the surgery entails?
----------

Surgical procedure is the best option of people diagnosed with Spinal Epidural lipomatosis.
Read some articles here:
http://www.healthaddicted.blogspot.com/
Comment  (+ info)

Have epidural lipomatosis. Should I fear the worst?


I have had constant back pain for the past five years. After going to many doctors I finally had an MRI done. The MRI turned out to say that I have epidural lipomatosis in the thoracic region of my back, where my back is constantly painful. My doctor did not tell me about any epidural lipomatosis though. It was on the MRI report and I only saw it when the document fell out of my MRI chart and I picked it up to read it. I did some research on epidural lipomatosis and discovered it to be rare and possibly dangerous, in that it might require surgery with a 22% morbidity rate. Should I be concerned with this disorder? Will it get worse? I am 23 and I feel like it will only get worse. Thank you for your help. I recently have started taking glucosamine thinking that it would help my flexibility, but I'm wondering if this would help the epidural lipomatosis.
----------

Lipomatosis is a condition marked by the excessive deposit of fat in a localized area. Epidural means located over or on the dura. Dura is a fibrous connective tissue membrane, the outermost of the meninges covering the spinal cord (dura mater spinalis) and brain (dura mater cerebri or dura mater encephali).

I do not have any more information on it, unforunately. Contact your doctor and ask him about the condition and why it was not mentioned to you during your visit. If you do not receive a satisfactory answer, then get a second oppinion.  (+ info)

Is there any way to get rid of multiple lipomatosis without surgery? Please help.?


No surgery is the only treatment option for this condition, if your doctor thinks your disease is threatening to your health you should get the surgery and be done with it  (+ info)

Epidural Lipomatosis (SEL) help with my MRI?


Lower back MRI results: L3-L4 mild generalized disc bulge. ///////no central canal stenosis or foraminal narrowing is noted. There is prominent epidural fat posterior to L3 and L4 verteebral body causing some narrowing of the thecal sac. This is suggestive of epidural lipomatosis.
L4-L5 there is generalized disc bulge and mild bilateral facet hypertrophey. there is mild central canal stenosis and mild bilateral foraminal narrowing. There is prominent epidural fat posetrior to the L5 vertebral body causing some narrowing of the thecal sac.
L5-S1 there is generalized disc bulge, eccentric to the left. mild bilateral facet hypertrophy is note3d. Severe left and mild right foraminal narrowing is noted. There is mild central cananl stenosos. there is prominent epidural fat surrounding the thecal sac causing some narrowing. suggestive of epidural lipomatosis.

CAN someone translate this to laymans terms
----------

google it  (+ info)

what is epidural lipomatosis?


  (+ info)

Can someone help with my MRI?


Lower back MRI results: L3-L4 mild generalized disc bulge. ///////no central canal stenosis or foraminal narrowing is noted. There is prominent epidural fat posterior to L3 and L4 vertebral body causing some narrowing of the thecal sac. This is suggestive of epidural lipomatosis.
L4-L5 there is generalized disc bulge and mild bilateral facet hypertrophey. there is mild central canal stenosis and mild bilateral foraminal narrowing. There is prominent epidural fat posterior to the L5 vertebral body causing some narrowing of the thecal sac.
L5-S1 there is generalized disc bulge, eccentric to the left. mild bilateral facet hypertrophy is note3d. Severe left and mild right foraminal narrowing is noted. There is mild central canal stenosis. there is prominent epidural fat surrounding the thecal sac causing some narrowing. suggestive of epidural lipomatosis.

CAN someone translate this to laymans terms
----------

First of all, don't be worried about the phrase "disc bulge." Over half of healthy, non-symptomatic adults in their 20s have disc bulges on MRIs and close to 100% of people over age 50 have them. The L4-5 and L5-S1 levels are the most common sites - these areas are most susceptible because of the way our spines are curved. In fact, studies have shown that, by looking at images alone, neither orthopedists, physical therapists, or general practitioners are able to identify which patients with disc bulges have low back pain and which are asymptomatic. So images that show bulges - except in the cases of trauma - are largely useless.

This is part of the big debate in the medical world right now...we want to attribute pain to anatomical causes, but the fact that so many people have anatomical "problems" but aren't in pain actually undermines this idea. Nevertheless, providers are always scared of being sued for negligance, so they get images for almost all low back pain patients...

But on to your question. Translation:
Disc bulge at the Lumbar 3-4 level. No narrowing of the vertebral canal (big hole where where the spinal cord runs) or intervertebral foramina (the small holes on the side, where the spinal nerves come out from between the vertebrae and go to the rest of the body). I.e. no nerve pinching visible. There are some fat deposits slightly encroaching on the "sack" just past the point where the spinal cord ends. (The thick spinal cord ends at the L2 level, but individual nerves continue to fan out a bit further down - this is called the cauda equina. Rather than have these nerves open to the elements, they're encased in the "thecal sac" and surrounded by spinal fluid for protection.)

Disc bulge at the Lumbar 4-5 level. Slight enlargment/thickening of the bony areas where the vertebrae connect with the ones above & below (facet joints). Mild narrowing of the vertebral canal and nerve root holes on the side. Prominent external fat deposits behind the L5 vertebra, encroaching on the thecal sac.

Disc bulge at Lumbar 5-Sacral 1 level. It's asymmetrical and is more prominent on the left side. Slight enlargment/thickening of the bony areas where the vertebrae connect. Significant narrowing of the left nerve root holes and mild narrowing of the right nerve root holes (left side more compromised than the right). Mild vertebral canal narrowing. Prominent fat deposit surrounding the thecal sac, causing some narrowing.

Hope this helps! I assume you're under a physician's care - but just reading through this, I'm obligated to encourage you to seek IMMEDIATE medical treatment if you start to experience numbness in your inner thighs/genital region or a change in (or loss of) bowel/bladder control. This is actually a medical emergency - it indicates that the cauda equina (those nerves in the thecal sac) is compromised.  (+ info)

PIERPONT SYNDROME has anyone else had this mentioned as a possible diagnosis for their child?


I am just wondering if anyone else has a child with special needs, who could possibly have this rare syndrome. Includes global developmental delay, feeding problems, lots of other things but there is one unique amomily - UNUSUAL FAT PADS ON THE FEET. The geneticists call it Plantar Lipomatosis.

My child is suspected P.S. but I have been lucky to have been contacted by others with children with this syndrome.

If your child has developmental delay, feeding problems and unusual fat pads on his or her feet, then PLEASE MAKE CONTACT!

You are not alone!
Kelly S, thank you so much but I am already aware of them. All the contacts I have are either members or contacts of members. Thanks though, nice to know someone cared to offer a constructive answer. P.S. is so rare that there are only 2 or 3 on making contact and I know of them.

I am trying to find out if any others are out there, who aren't at this stage yet and therefore don't know anyone.

Very good info though, thanks again. xx
----------

I think I have found the answer to your prayers. It's a web site with support for this syndrome and you can make contact with others either suffering from this syndrome, or who have family members or children who do. I really hope it helps you find some good supportive friends:

http://www.makingcontact.org/index.php?ci=2048  (+ info)

PIERPONT SYNDROME has anyone else had this mentioned as a possible diagnosis for their child?


I am just wondering if anyone else has a child with special needs, who could possibly have this rare syndrome. Includes global developmental delay, feeding problems, lots of other things but there is one unique amomily - UNUSUAL FAT PADS ON THE FEET. The geneticists call it Plantar Lipomatosis.

My child is suspected P.S. but I have been lucky to have been contacted by others with children with this syndrome.

If your child has developmental delay, feeding problems and unusual fat pads on his or her feet, then PLEASE MAKE CONTACT!

You are not alone!
Philo, no, the thanks goes to YOU! You are doing so much for us (suspected or confirmed) P.S. parents. Just thought I would have another stab at finding more, but as big as Yahoo Answers is, no more members to the family! Well, anything is worth a try, isn't it?
----------

Good Job searching out others, Adamadamum! Thank you!  (+ info)