• bacterium
  • This method of recombinational diversity of the tail allows the virus to keep up with the bacterium. (wikipedia.org)
  • The adsorbtion and penetration process use such lysozymes to create an opening within the peptidoglycan layer of the bacterial cell wall allowing transfer of the viral DNA into the bacterium. (wikipedia.org)
  • strains
  • We know from previous genetic studies that this tail loop is almost identical across strains of influenza A, so drugs that target the tail have a high potential of being effective against multiple strains, including the H5N1 strains. (biologynews.net)
  • sequences
  • These fosmids recruited a higher proportion of viral metagenomic sequences from Saanich Inlet than from nearby northeastern subarctic Pacific Ocean (Line P) waters, indicating differences in the viral communities between coastal and open ocean locations. (frontiersin.org)
  • Although advances in nucleic-acid technologies have greatly increased the rate and depth to which the genetic diversity and ecology of viral communities can be interrogated, the inferences drawn from sequence-based investigations are hampered by methodological biases and non-representative databases of viral sequences. (frontiersin.org)
  • This domain does not contact RNA, and instead, it recognizes 15 residues sequences that are a part of the PABP interaction motif (PAM-2) found on such proteins as eukaryotic translation termination factor (eRF3) and PABP interacting proteins 1 and 2 (PAIP 1, PAIP2). (wikipedia.org)
  • Replication results in the creation of a series of circular head to tail sequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • membrane fusion
  • During viral and target cell membrane fusion, the coiled coil regions (heptad repeats) assume a trimer-of-hairpins structure, positioning the fusion peptide in close proximity to the C-terminal region of the ectodomain. (abcam.com)
  • fragment
  • New method for localizing proteins in periodic structures: Fab fragment labeling combined with image processing of electron micrographs. (currentprotocols.com)
  • Most of these proteins contain a C-terminal putative transmembrane (TM) fragment and a pair of hydrophobic alpha helices (alpha5-alpha6) similar to the membrane insertion fragments of the ion-channel domain of diphtheria toxin and colicins. (jove.com)
  • peptides
  • Progress in the knowledge of the structure of many of the main molecular actors of the apoptotic signal transduction pathways has driven the design of synthetic peptides that in some cases can function as simplified versions of their parent proteins. (jove.com)
  • Most applications of peptides in apoptosis research are so far related to caspases, caspase regulatory proteins, such as LAPs and Smac, and proteins of the Bcl-2 family. (jove.com)
  • Protein homeostasis results in a steady supply of peptides, which are further degraded to fuel protein synthesis or metabolic needs of the cell. (surrey.ac.uk)
  • Antigenic peptides are guided to major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules and are finally displayed on the cell surface, where they mount an adaptive immune response against viral infected or malignantly transformed cells. (surrey.ac.uk)
  • degradation
  • The F-box protein is one of the four components of the SCF (SKp1, Cullin, F-box protein) complex, which mediates ubiquitination of proteins targeted for degradation by the proteasome, playing an essential role in many cellular processes. (mdpi.com)
  • The SCF E3 ubiquitin-ligase complex participates in the recognition and recruitment of target proteins for ubiquitination and degradation by the ubiquitin 26S proteasome system (UPS). (mdpi.com)
  • The poly(A)-binding protein may also protect the tail from degradation and regulate mRNA production. (wikipedia.org)
  • dsDNA
  • Group: dsDNA Order: Caudovirales Family: Myoviridae Sub-Family: Tevenvirinae Genus: T4virus (alias T4-like viruses) Escherichia virus AR1 Escherichia virus C40 Escherichia virus E112 Escherichia virus EMCL134 Escherichia virus RB3 Escherichia phage RB14 Enterobacteria phage T2 Enterobacteria phage T4 Shigella virus Pss1 Shigella virus Shfl2 Yersinia virus D1 Yersinia virus PST T4viruse species are nonenveloped, with a head and tail. (wikipedia.org)
  • Group: dsDNA Order: Caudovirales Family: Myoviridae Sub-Family: Peduovirinae Genus: P2likevirus Burkholderia phage phi52237 Burkholderia phage phiE202 Burkholderia phage phiE12-2 Enterobacteria phage 186 Enterobacteria phage P2 Enterobacteria phage PsP3 Enterobacteria phage Wphi Mannheimia phage phiMhaA1-PHL101 Pseudomonas phage phiCTX Ralstonia phage RSA1 Salmonella Fels-2 Salmonella SopEphi Yersinia phage L-413C P2likeviruses are nonenveloped, with a head and tail. (wikipedia.org)
  • Group: dsDNA Order: Caudovirales Family: Siphoviridae Genus: Tunalikevirus Cronobacter phage Esp2949-1 Enterobacter phage F20 Enterobacteria phage T1 Escherichia phage Eb49 Escherichia phage Jk06 Escherichia phage Rogue1 Escherichia phage Rtp Escherichia phage Tls Shigella phage Shfl1 Tunalikeviruses are nonenveloped, with a head and tail. (wikipedia.org)
  • Group: dsDNA Order: Caudovirales Family: Siphoviridae Genus: Lambdalikevirus Enterobacteria phage HK022 Enterobacteria phage HK97 Enterobacteria phage lambda Lambdalikeviruses are nonenveloped, with a head and tail. (wikipedia.org)
  • Group: dsDNA Order: Caudovirales Family: Podoviridae Sub-Family: Picovirinae Genus: Phi29likevirus Bacillus phage B103 Bacillus phage GA-1 Bacillus phage phi29 Kurthia phage 6 Phi29likeviruses are nonenveloped, with a head and tail. (wikipedia.org)
  • Group: dsDNA Order: Caudovirales Family: Podoviridae Sub-Family: Autographivirinae Genus: Sp6likevirus Enterobacteria phage K5 Enterobacteria phage K1-5 Enterobacteria phage K1E Enterobacteria phage SP6 Erwinia amylovora phage Era103 Sp6likeviruses are non-enveloped, with a head and tail. (wikipedia.org)
  • eukaryotic
  • In particular, we are interested in molecular machineries that facilitate protein and peptide translocation across eukaryotic membranes. (surrey.ac.uk)
  • This binding forms the characteristic loop structure of eukaryotic protein synthesis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Receptor
  • Influenza virus has two kinds of peplomers: 1) triangular, spike-shaped "haemagglutinin" and 2) mushroom-shaped "neuraminidase" Virus Glycoprotein Receptor (biochemistry) T4 phage Viral entry Viral life cycle Saunders Comprehensive Veterinary Dictionary (3rd ed. (wikipedia.org)
  • dependent
  • In infected cells, there have been high magnitudes of both translation induction (GACC-tailed mRNA) and reduction (poly(A)-tailed mRNA) both dependent on the rotavirus strain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The genome is replicated through a unique rolling hairpin mechanism that is dependent on the NS1 protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • The P1 plasmid combats this by several methods: The plasmid replication is tightly regulated by a RepA protein dependent mechanism. (wikipedia.org)
  • machinery
  • In light of its important role within the MHC I antigen processing pathway, TAP is a prime target for viral immune evasion strategies, and we summarize how this antigen translocation machinery is sabotaged by viral factors. (surrey.ac.uk)
  • Translation using host cell machinery produces new viral components to be assembled. (wikipedia.org)
  • The host DNA recombination machinery or the cre enzyme translated from the viral DNA recombine the terminally redundant ends and circularize the genome. (wikipedia.org)
  • complete
  • Here, we describe viral communities inhabiting oxic surface (10 m) and oxygen-starved basin (200 m) waters of Saanich Inlet, a seasonally anoxic fjord on the coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia using viral metagenomics and complete viral fosmid sequencing on samples collected between April 2007 and April 2010. (frontiersin.org)
  • molecule
  • Wilmanns' lab and the team of Mathias Gautel, an EMBL alumnus and now at King's College, have thought that a molecule called titin, the largest protein made by human cells, is involved. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Peijian Zou and Nikos Pinotsis from the Wilmanns lab obtained crystals of parts of the titin molecule bound to another protein, called telethonin. (bio-medicine.org)
  • 6 . The isolated nucleic acid of claim 3 , wherein the viral surface protein is gp120 or a modified form of gp120, wherein the modification alters the immunogenicity of the molecule relative to wild type gp120. (google.com)
  • icosahedral
  • All viruses in this order have icosahedral or oblate heads but differ in the length and contractile abilities of their tails. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has an icosahedral head containing the genome attached at one vertex to the tail. (wikipedia.org)
  • bound
  • The single-strand RNA is tightly bound to p17 nucleocapsid proteins, late assembly protein p6, and enzymes essential to the development of the virion, such as reverse transcriptase and integrase. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • p>This section provides information about the protein and gene name(s) and synonym(s) and about the organism that is the source of the protein sequence. (uniprot.org)
  • p>This subsection of the 'Names and taxonomy' section indicates the name(s) of the gene(s) that code for the protein sequence(s) described in the entry. (uniprot.org)
  • virus
  • The genome and proteins of HIV (human immunodeficiency virus) have been the subject of extensive research since the discovery of the virus in 1983. (wikipedia.org)
  • The so-called SOSIP trimers not only reproduce the antigenic properties of the native viral spike but also display the same degree of immature glycans as presented on the native virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • The term 'peplomer' is typically used to refer to a grouping of heterologous proteins on the virus surface that function together. (wikipedia.org)
  • A feature of the picornavirus genome is the virus protein that is linked at the 5' end of the genome, known as "VPg" (Virus-Protein-attached-to-the-Genome). (wikipedia.org)
  • Cell
  • The cell as a collection of protein machines: Preparing the next generation of molecular biologists. (currentprotocols.com)
  • There is a small binding pocket for the tail loop of the protein that appears to be a promising target for a new class of antiviral drugs," said lead researcher Jane Tao, assistant professor in biochemistry and cell biology. (biologynews.net)
  • Tao said the research also provides clues about NP's role in signaling a cell to begin making copies of the viral genome, and Tao's group is continuing its work with co-author Robert Krug at the University of Texas at Austin to explore the protein's regulatory functions. (biologynews.net)
  • sequence data
  • The prediction of protein function from structure or sequence data remains a problem best addressed by leveraging information available from previously determined structure-function relationships. (ucsf.edu)
  • interactions
  • Besides the F-box domain, other domains and motifs related to protein-protein interactions are usually present in the C -terminal region of FBPs, such as leucine rich repeats (LRR), WD40 repeats (WD), Kelch repeats, proline-rich and others. (mdpi.com)
  • Since the two central β-strands are used for poly(A) oligonucleotide binding, the other face of the protein is free for protein-protein interactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • target
  • a href='/help/protein_existence' target='_top'>More. (uniprot.org)
  • The research, published online today by Nature, offers tantalizing evidence of a potential drug target in a flu protein called nucleoprotein, or NP. (biologynews.net)
  • copies
  • HIV-1 is composed of two copies of noncovalently linked, unspliced, positive-sense single-stranded RNA enclosed by a conical capsid composed of the viral protein p24, typical of lentiviruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • taxonomy
  • p>This subsection of the 'Names and Taxonomy' section provides an exhaustive list of all names of the protein, from commonly used to obsolete, to allow unambiguous identification of a protein. (uniprot.org)
  • terminal
  • Cytosolic poly-A binding protein (PABPC) is made up of four RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a C-terminal region known as the PABC domain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The structure of human poly(A)-binding protein found in the nucleus (PABPN1) has yet to be well determined but it has been shown to contain a single RRM domain and an arginine rich carboxy terminal domain. (wikipedia.org)
  • This causes the C terminal end of the protein to switch between two alternate forms at a low frequency. (wikipedia.org)
  • surface
  • 14 . The isolated nucleic acid of any one of claims 1 - 13 , wherein the stabilization of the complex is achieved by one or more cysteine-cysteine bonds that are formed between the surface and transmembrane proteins and that are not present in the corresponding wildtype complex. (google.com)