• infarction
  • Splenic infarction is also more common in hematological disorders with associated splenomegaly, such as the myeloproliferative disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Splenic infarction can also result from a sickle cell crisis in patients with sickle cell anemia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Any factor that directly compromises the splenic artery can cause infarction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Splenic infarction can be due to vasculitis or disseminated intravascular coagulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Various other conditions have been associated with splenic infarction in case reporters, for example granulomatosis with polyangiitis or treatment with medications that predispose to vasospasm or blood clot formation, such as vasoconstrictors used to treat esophageal varices, sumatriptan or bevacizumab. (wikipedia.org)
  • Splenic infarction can be induced for the treatment of such conditions as portal hypertension or splenic injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • arterioles
  • When these arteries then reach the white pulp, and become covered with periarteriolar lymphoid sheaths, the name changes again to central arteries (or central arterioles). (wikipedia.org)
  • veins
  • Arteries carry blood away from the heart to the lungs or the rest of the body, where the blood passes through capillaries, and veins return the blood to the heart. (wikipedia.org)
  • An AVM interferes with this process by forming a direct connection of the arteries and veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • It can be extremely fragile and prone to bleeding because of the abnormally direct connections between high-pressure arteries and low-pressure veins. (wikipedia.org)
  • The resultant sign, audible via stethoscope, is a rhythmic, whooshing sound caused by excessively rapid blood flow through the arteries and veins. (wikipedia.org)