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  • tumours
  • With an increase in the survival of patients with spinal tumours, there is a probability of an increase in the rate of implant failure. (springer.com)
  • Interventional oncology has developed to a separate pillar of modern oncology and it employs X-ray, ultrasound, computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to help guide miniaturized instruments (e.g. biopsy needles, ablation electrodes, intravascular catheters) to allow targeted and precise treatment of solid tumours (also known as neoplasms) located in various organs of the human body, including but not limited to the liver, kidneys, lungs, and bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • vertebral
  • Most common causes include iatrogenic lumbar punctures, burst fractures resulting in posterior migration of fragments of the vertebral body, severe disc herniations, spinal anaesthesia involving trauma from catheters and high local anaesthetic concentrations around the cauda equina, penetrating trauma such as knife wounds or ballistic trauma. (wikipedia.org)
  • The symptoms seen are due to spinal nerve compression and weakening of the vertebral structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • benign
  • Urinary retention, which is a common complication of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), though it can also be caused by other types of urinary tract obstruction, nerve dysfunction, tethered spinal cord syndrome, constipation, infection and certain medications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diseases
  • Dr. Veeravagu is focused on advancing minimally invasive surgical techniques for diseases of the spine and cares for patients with a wide range of spinal disorders. (stanford.edu)
  • therapeutic
  • Evolving experience with direct puncture therapeutic embolization for adjunctive and palliative management of head and neck hypervascular neoplasms. (springer.com)
  • Tuberculosis
  • Chronic spinal inflammatory conditions such as Paget disease, neurosarcoidosis, chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, ankylosing spondylitis and chronic tuberculosis can cause it. (wikipedia.org)
  • Inability to walk, with this unusual sensory examination completes a triad of signs and usually represents spinal tuberculosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • nerve
  • After the conus medullaris, the canal contains a mass of nerves (the cauda equina or "horse-tail") that branches off the lower end of the spinal cord and contains the nerve roots from L1-5 and S1-5. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Infections: candidiasis, herpes, HPV Inflammation: lichen planus Neoplasm: Paget's disease, vulvar carcinoma Neurologic disorder: neuralgia secondary to herpes virus, spinal nerve injury[citation needed] There are a number of possible treatments with none being uniformly effective. (wikipedia.org)
  • Carcinoma
  • Transitional cell carcinoma (bladder cancer), renal cell carcinoma (kidney cancer), and prostate cancer are examples of neoplasms affecting the urinary system. (wikipedia.org)
  • secondary
  • This report presents the case of a 26-year-old male patient who was diagnosed with pathological fracture of the thoracic spine (T10), secondary to paraganglioma, thus causing complete spinal cord injury. (scielo.br)
  • cord injury
  • Dr. Veeravagu graduated from the Johns Hopkins University Biomedical Engineering program with a focus on spinal cord injury and regeneration. (stanford.edu)
  • As a resident, Dr. Veeravagu was appointed by the President of the United States as a White House Fellow in 2012, serving as Special Assistant to Secretary of Defense Leon Panetta and Chuck Hagel to guide Department of Defense Policy on traumatic brain injury, spinal cord injury, and mental health treatment for the United States military. (stanford.edu)
  • surgical
  • I. To perform a small pilot study that will demonstrate the feasibility of neurosurgical spinal procedures using the da Vinci surgical robot. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Radiation
  • Radiation is usually delivered to the involved segment in the spinal cord as well as to the uninvolved segment above and below the involved segment. (wikipedia.org)
  • In these cases, untreated survival usually amounts to only a few months, and survival with current radiation and chemotherapy treatments may extend that time from around a year to a year and a half, possibly two or more, depending on the patient's condition, immune function, treatments used, and the specific type of malignant brain neoplasm. (wikipedia.org)
  • usually
  • They usually arise in the cerebellum, near the brainstem, in the hypothalamic region, or the optic chiasm, but they may occur in any area where astrocytes are present, including the cerebral hemispheres and the spinal cord. (wikipedia.org)