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  • cord
  • Patients with high thoracic or cervical spinal cord lesions are at risk of autonomic dysreflexia (a life-threatening syndrome of malignant hypertension, bradycardia or tachycardia, headache, piloerection, and sweating due to unregulated sympathetic hyperactivity). (patient.info)
  • It may result from peripheral nerve damage or spinal cord damage at the S2 to S4 level. (patient.info)
  • It usually results from brain damage or spinal cord damage above T12. (patient.info)
  • Mixed patterns (flaccid and spastic bladder) may be caused by many disorders, including syphilis, diabetes mellitus and brain or spinal cord tumours. (patient.info)
  • Its clinical application within acute traumatic spinal cord injury would therefore seem very plausible, it having the potential to combat the pathophysiological secondary injury processes that can develop in the proceeding hours to days following the initial injury. (bmj.com)
  • Despite a recent resurgence of interest, which in turn has produced encouraging results, there is a real possibility that this potentially transformational intervention for treating traumatic spinal cord injury could remain an experimental therapy and never reach clinical implementation. (bmj.com)
  • Central
  • Its multifactorial mechanisms of action, including lowering metabolic rate and reducing acute inflammatory cellular processes, ultimately provide protection for central nervous tissue from continuing injury following ischaemic or traumatic insult. (bmj.com)
  • acute
  • Scientists hope the stem cell therapy will prevent permanent paralysis caused by acute spinal cord injuries and even return feeling and movement in patients who suffered the paralyzing injury two weeks before treatment. (go.com)
  • An international team led by researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine reports that a single injection of human neural stem cells produced neuronal regeneration and improvement of function and mobility in rats impaired by an acute spinal cord injury (SCI). (ucsd.edu)
  • This is exciting, especially because, historically, there has been very little to offer patients with acute spinal cord injury," said study co-author Joseph Ciacci, MD, professor of surgery and program director of the Neurosurgery Residency at the UC San Diego School of Medicine. (ucsd.edu)
  • Some experimental treatments, including systemic hypothermia, have been performed in isolated cases in order to draw attention to the need for further preclinical and clinical studies to help clarify the role of hypothermia in acute spinal cord injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • thoracic
  • Pending approval by UC San Diego's Institutional Review Board, the next step is a small phase 1 trial to test safety and efficacy with patients who have suffered a thoracic spinal cord injury (between vertebrae T2-T12) one to two years earlier, and who have no motor or sensory function at or below the spinal injury site. (ucsd.edu)
  • Injuries can be cervical 1-8 (C1-C8), thoracic 1-12 (T1-T12), lumbar 1-5 (L1-L5), or sacral (S1-S5). (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • Learn more about first aid for head and spinal cord injuries including some of the common causes, symptoms and treatment. (health24.com)
  • Depending on the location and severity of damage along the spinal cord, the symptoms can vary widely, from pain or numbness to paralysis to incontinence. (wikipedia.org)
  • In chiropractic, vertebral subluxation is a purported misalignment of the spinal column, not visible on X-rays, leading to a set of signs and symptoms sometimes termed vertebral subluxation complex. (wikipedia.org)
  • stem
  • A three-dimensional, reconstructed magnetic resonance image (upper) shows a cavity caused by a spinal injury nearly filled with grafted neural stem cells, colored green. (ucsd.edu)
  • Martin Marsala, MD, professor in the Department of Anesthesiology, with colleagues at UC San Diego and in Slovakia, the Czech Republic and The Netherlands, said grafting neural stem cells derived from a human fetal spinal cord to the rats' spinal injury site produced an array of therapeutic benefits - from less muscle spasticity to new connections between the injected stem cells and surviving host neurons. (ucsd.edu)
  • The human stem cells, said the scientists, appeared to vigorously take root at the injury site. (ucsd.edu)
  • The rats received the pure stem cell grafts three days after injury (no other supporting materials were used) and were given drugs to suppress an immune response to the foreign stem cells. (ucsd.edu)
  • Grafted spinal stem cells are rich source of different growth factors which can have a neuroprotective effect and can promote sprouting of nerve fibers of the host neurons. (ucsd.edu)
  • The healing effects of stem cells in spinal cord injury can be aided by their ability to hitch intercellular rides to specific anti-inflammatory cells called M2 macrophages, Yale researchers report. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Research into new treatments for spinal cord injuries includes stem cell implantation, engineered materials for tissue support, epidural spinal stimulation, and wearable robotic exoskeletons. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hope is that stem cells transplanted into an injured area of the spinal cord will allow neuroregeneration. (wikipedia.org)
  • disability
  • You can't take spinal injuries very lightly because to put it simply, they can cause permanent disability or even death. (pmetb.org.uk)
  • SCI causes difficulties in romantic partnerships, due to problems with sexual function and to other stresses introduced by the injury and disability, but many of those with SCI have fulfilling relationships and marriages. (wikipedia.org)
  • A British policemen describes his spinal cord injury disability and dealings with the Greater Manchester Police. (dmoztools.net)
  • epidural
  • Epidural cooling saddles, surgically placed over acutely traumatized spinal cord tissue, have been used to evaluate potentially beneficial effects of localized hypothermia, with and without concomitant glucocorticoids. (wikipedia.org)
  • nerve
  • There is currently no cure for spinal cord injury or treatment to help nerve regeneration so therapies offering intervention are limited. (medicalxpress.com)
  • The area of skin innervated by a specific spinal nerve is called a dermatome, and the group of muscles innervated by a single spinal nerve is called a myotome. (wikipedia.org)
  • lesion
  • These changes translate into loss of muscle function, sensation, or autonomic function in parts of the body served by the spinal cord below the level of the lesion. (wikipedia.org)
  • catastrophic
  • I am a Partner in the Personal Injury Department and Head of the Leeds office at Stewarts, the UK's leading catastrophic injury law firm. (apil.org.uk)
  • Known since ancient times to be a catastrophic injury and long believed to be untreatable, SCI has seen great improvements in its care since the middle of the 20th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • body's
  • Traditionally, the "specific focus of chiropractic practice" is the chiropractic subluxation and historical chiropractic practice assumes that a vertebral subluxation or spinal joint dysfunction interferes with the body's function and its Innate Intelligence, as promulgated by D. D. Palmer, the inventor of chiropractic. (wikipedia.org)
  • Solicitors
  • We can give you access to the very best spinal injury solicitors in the UK and have helped many clients to achieve the compensation they needed and deserved. (injuriesdirect.com)
  • Injuries Direct is a trading style of Amanda Cunliffe Solicitors Limited, the company is UK based registration number 6945583. (injuriesdirect.com)
  • TheYEC has a team of personal injury solicitors that deal with spinal injury compensation claims through a No Win No Fee basis . (theyec.org)
  • One of our expert personal injury solicitors that specializes in spinal injury compensation will read over your case on a No Win No Fee basis and explain to you how successful the claim is expected to be. (theyec.org)
  • occur
  • A spinal injury may occur in sport or recreation, especially in a body contact sport such as rugby, or from striking a submerged object when diving into shallow or murky water. (issuu.com)
  • Complications that can occur in the short and long term after injury include muscle atrophy, pressure sores, infections, and respiratory problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • this can coexist with or result in injury to the spinal cord itself but each injury can occur without the other. (wikipedia.org)
  • nerves
  • Neuromyelitis optica (NMO), also known as Devic's disease, is a central nervous system disorder that primarily affects the eye nerves (optic neuritis) and the spinal cord (myelitis). (medicalxpress.com)
  • The part of the spinal cord that was damaged corresponds to the spinal nerves at that level and below. (wikipedia.org)
  • The nerves in this area are connected to the very lowest region of the spinal cord, and retaining sensation and function in these parts of the body indicates that the spinal cord is only partially damaged. (wikipedia.org)
  • sensory
  • We have also demonstrated that grafted neurons can develop contacts with the host neurons and, to some extent, restore the connectivity between centers, above and below the injury, which are involved in motor and sensory processing. (ucsd.edu)
  • solicitor
  • Through a series of questions, an expert solicitor will be able to assist you in determining the actual person or party liable for the injury. (pmetb.org.uk)
  • Another reason why you should deal with a solicitor in spinal injury claims is because it is possible that the accident happened outside the United Kingdom. (pmetb.org.uk)
  • Mike Massen has been a practicing solicitor for over 20 years and has dealt with personal injury matters throughout his career. (apil.org.uk)
  • physical
  • In the majority of cases the damage results from physical trauma such as car accidents, gunshots, falls, or sports injuries, but it can also result from nontraumatic causes such as infection, insufficient blood flow, and tumors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dedicated to the improvement of the physical quality of life for persons with a spinal cord injury through targeted scientific and medical research. (dmoztools.net)
  • research
  • NSCISC supports and directs the collection, management and analysis of the world's largest and longest spinal cord injury research database. (uab.edu)
  • Spinal cord injury affects the heart, that's what research published in Experimental Physiology and carried out by researchers from University of British Columbia, Canada has found. (medicalxpress.com)
  • Research On Dogs' Spinal Cord Injuries May Lead To Help For. (chicagotribune.com)
  • The Center for Paralysis Research develops and clinically tests novel methods of treatment for spinal cord injury and the effects of paralysis. (dmoztools.net)
  • The report, entitled "Xenotransplantation of Transgenic Pig Myelin Forming Cells Promotes Axonal Regeneration and Restores Conduction Across the transected spinal cord," is based on research conducted in the laboratories of Dr. Jeffrey D. Kocsis of the Department of Neurology, Yale University School of Medicine, and Dr. William L. Fodor, Senior Director of Xenotransplantation at Alexion Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and their colleagues. (dmoztools.net)
  • Provides grants to spinal cord injury victims based on financial need and funds research. (dmoztools.net)
  • tissue
  • A team has engineered an enzyme that can gobble up scar tissue formed after spinal cord injuries, and is working with Acorda Therapeutics to develop it. (diabetesincontrol.com)
  • The damage can also be divided into primary and secondary injury: the cell death that occurs immediately in the original injury, and biochemical cascades that are initiated by the original insult and cause further tissue damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • trials
  • How soon after injury to perform decompressive surgery is a controversial topic, and it has been difficult to prove that earlier surgery provides better outcomes in human trials. (wikipedia.org)
  • cord
  • Patients with high thoracic or cervical spinal cord lesions are at risk of autonomic dysreflexia (a life-threatening syndrome of malignant hypertension, bradycardia or tachycardia, headache, piloerection, and sweating due to unregulated sympathetic hyperactivity). (patient.info)
  • It may result from peripheral nerve damage or spinal cord damage at the S2 to S4 level. (patient.info)
  • It usually results from brain damage or spinal cord damage above T12. (patient.info)
  • Mixed patterns (flaccid and spastic bladder) may be caused by many disorders, including syphilis, diabetes mellitus and brain or spinal cord tumours. (patient.info)
  • Its clinical application within acute traumatic spinal cord injury would therefore seem very plausible, it having the potential to combat the pathophysiological secondary injury processes that can develop in the proceeding hours to days following the initial injury. (bmj.com)
  • Despite a recent resurgence of interest, which in turn has produced encouraging results, there is a real possibility that this potentially transformational intervention for treating traumatic spinal cord injury could remain an experimental therapy and never reach clinical implementation. (bmj.com)
  • Central
  • Its multifactorial mechanisms of action, including lowering metabolic rate and reducing acute inflammatory cellular processes, ultimately provide protection for central nervous tissue from continuing injury following ischaemic or traumatic insult. (bmj.com)
  • medication
  • A. At CARE, we provide a wide range of modern tools such as Precision nerve injections, radio frequency, IDET, Spinal cord stimulation, implantable morphine pumps, physical therapy, medication and psychological support. (medindia.net)
  • spine
  • The part Wood left in created a serrated edge that sliced Jenks' back open in two places, causing him to leak spinal fluid and triggering an infection in his spine. (wikipedia.org)
  • signals
  • Siebel Scholar Rachel Miller using calcium imaging to examine a dorsal root ganglion, a cluster of nerve cell bodies that brings pain signals from the knee to the spinal cord. (siebelscholars.com)
  • The spinal cord functions primarily in the transmission of nerve signals from the motor cortex to the body, and from the afferent fibers of the sensory neurons to the sensory cortex. (wikipedia.org)
  • back
  • 5. About 2% of the US workforce receives compensation for back injuries annually. (novahealthandwellness.com)
  • Risk factors for increased back injury include heavy manual lifting requirements, poor or low control of the work environment, and prior incidence of low back pain. (novahealthandwellness.com)
  • On July 23, 2006, during the filming of a skateboarding video at Derby skatepark in Santa Cruz, Bailey crashed on his skateboard, fracturing several vertebrae in his back (L3, L4, S3), damaging his spinal cord in the process, which left him paralyzed from the waist down as a result. (wikipedia.org)
  • recovery
  • When you have an injury to a muscle, both strength and flexibility are compromised, and if your recovery ends before strength and flexibility return, you will never be 100% and will likely struggle with the problem forever. (sciaticnervecure.info)
  • Lifelong The patient's various needs throughout their life must be catered for, by ensuring continuity of care all the way through from injury onset to the highest possible level of recovery of function. (wikipedia.org)
  • support
  • Since his injury, Bailey's sponsors have continued to support him, giving him the opportunity to surf on tour. (wikipedia.org)
  • Series
  • Since his injury in July 2006, Bailey has surfed and chairskated in expression sessions during the O'Neill Coldwater Classic (2006-12), US Open of Surfing (2007-12), Hurley Pro at Lowers WCT (2008-11) Reef Panama Classic (2007-08, 2010), Quicksilver Pro Hossegor (2008-10), NSSA National Championships (2007), WSA National Championships (2008-10) and the Volcom Crustacious Tour Series (2008-11). (wikipedia.org)