Loading...
  • myelopathy
  • Myelopathy describes any neurologic deficit related to the spinal cord. (wikipedia.org)
  • The presence and severity of myelopathy can also be evaluated by means of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (TMS), a neurophysiological method that allows the measurement of the time required for a neural impulse to cross the pyramidal tracts, starting from the cerebral cortex and ending at the anterior horn cells of the cervical, thoracic or lumbar spinal cord. (wikipedia.org)
  • TMS can aid physicians to: determine whether myelopathy exists identify the level of the spinal cord where myelopathy is located. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute
  • When due to trauma, it is known as (acute) spinal cord injury. (wikipedia.org)
  • The spinal-cord hyperintensity seen at the C5-C6 is suggestive of chronic lesion and most likely responsible for the chronic history of cervical pain, while the C5-C6 lesion was most likely responsible for the acute tetraplegia. (wikipedia.org)
  • kyphosis
  • Gibbus deformity is included in a subset of structural kyphosis that is distinguished by a higher-degree angle in the spinal curve that is specific to these forms of kyphosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • numbness
  • Thus, depending on which angle the spinal cord is compressed from, a person could experience numbness versus a loss of the ability to control muscles (often seen as an odd limp), depending on which area is compressed. (encyclopedia.com)
  • trauma
  • Surgical management aims to stop repetitive trauma to the spinal cord. (thehorse.com)
  • Most authors favour degeneration of the intervertebral disc as the major cause of spinal disc herniation and cite trauma as a low cause. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • Our results also implicate the need for development of local and regional guidelines for treatment of patients with spinal cord compression, as well as the importance of information to patients at risk. (diva-portal.org)
  • Incidence of SEA is on the rise, due to factors such as an aging population, increase in use of invasive spinal instrumentation, growing number of patients with risk factors such as diabetes and intravenous drug use. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • Injuries can occur at any level of the spinal cord and can be classified as complete injury, a total loss of sensation and muscle function, or incomplete, meaning some nervous signals are able to travel past the injured area of the cord. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hemorrhagic infarction (bleeding) of the spinal cord can occur as a sequela to acute injury, such as that caused by intervertebral disc extrusion (being forced or pressed out). (wikipedia.org)
  • fluid
  • The concept of the thing is to draw out some spinal fluid and inject the dye and this will go around and show the doctors a path of where the dye does and does not go. (healthboards.com)
  • The radio opacity characteristics are such that finer detail is displayed with Metrizamide as well as the advantage of reabsorption from spinal fluid and excretion from the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • bone
  • Pain may be experienced as a result of irritation to the sensory nerve roots by bone depending on the degree of displacement and the presence of any rotatory positioning of the individual spinal motion segments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Certain MRI findings can detect where bone density and matter has been lost in people with spinal cord injuries. (wikipedia.org)
  • mechanical
  • Spinal cord injury can be traumatic or nontraumatic, and can be classified into three types based on cause: mechanical forces, toxic, and ischemic (from lack of blood flow). (wikipedia.org)
  • This is because of the variable nature of the impact on nerve tissue and of the mechanical impact on the spinal joints themselves. (wikipedia.org)
  • injuries
  • In many cases, spinal cord injuries require substantial, long-term physical and occupational therapy in rehabilitation, especially if they interfere with activities of daily living. (wikipedia.org)
  • Any accidents or injuries attained during athletic competition to the spinal cord may result in myelomalacia. (wikipedia.org)
  • cage
  • Six months later, vertebrectomy was performed to radically excise the recurrent mass and a titanium spinal cage was placed. (orthovet.org)
  • Muscle
  • These changes translate into loss of muscle function, sensation, or autonomic function in parts of the body served by the spinal cord below the level of the lesion. (wikipedia.org)
  • column
  • The afferent neuron travels to the spinal column, then up to the brain, where the information is processed. (wikipedia.org)
  • anterior
  • Stairstepped Retrolisthesis - The body of one vertebra is posterior to the body of the spinal segment above, but is anterior to the one below. (wikipedia.org)
  • result
  • citation needed] The most common way the disorder occurs is from a result of hemorrhaging (bleeding within) or inadequate blood supply to the spinal cord, making it weak and susceptible to damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • physical
  • Since the profession's inception, spinal manipulative therapy has been a component of the physical therapist practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • dogs
  • In middle-aged and older dogs such as Dobermans, intervertebral disc disease leads to bulging of the disc or herniation of the disc contents, and the spinal cord is compressed. (wikipedia.org)