• gene expression
  • Research by Cole and colleagues showed that perceived social isolation is associated with gene expression - specifically, the under-expression of genes bearing anti-inflammatory glucocorticoid response elements and over-expression of genes bearing response elements for pro-inflammatory NF-κB/Rel transcription factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • As far as we know, this is the first assessment of gene expression in mammary glands, looking at the molecular basis for differences in tumor development under the setting of social stress," Conzen said at a news conference Tuesday. (drugs.com)
  • Three and a half weeks into the isolation, Conzen's team measured gene expression in the animals' mammary glands, the equivalent of the human breast. (drugs.com)
  • The work showsfor the first timethat social isolation is associated with altered gene expression in mouse mammary glands, and that these changes are accompanied by larger tumors. (bio-medicine.org)
  • This interdisciplinary research illustrates that the social environment, and a social animal's response to that environment, can indeed alter the level of gene expression in a wide variety of tissues, not only the brain," said Suzanne D. Conzen, MD, associate professor of medicine at the University of Chicago and senior author of the study, to be published on September 30, 2009, in Cancer Prevention Research . (bio-medicine.org)
  • tumor
  • While many of these discoveries are based on shoddy science, a recent study, which was actually rather elegant in design, has found that a lack of social interaction can lead to increased breast cancer tumor growth, indicating that social environment could play a role, along with environmental and genetic factors, in the determination of the severity of a cancer. (blastmagazine.com)
  • increases
  • Major increases in NPY levels are seen when isolation and the high fat diet are combined. (medindia.net)
  • For example, suicide rates have been lower on Super Bowl Sundays than other Sundays, and it is believed that the social connectedness that occurs from being a fan of a sport's team increases one's feeling of belongingness. (wikipedia.org)
  • periods
  • All types of social isolation can include staying home for lengthy periods of time, having no communication with family, acquaintances or friends, and/or willfully avoiding any contact with other humans when those opportunities do arise. (wikipedia.org)
  • exclusion
  • The research backs up ILC-UK's analysis of the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing last year which found that almost four in ten of those aged 85 or older faced some kind of social exclusion. (healthcanal.com)
  • Stigma and discrimination can add to the suffering and disability associated with mental disorders, leading to various social movements attempting to increase understanding and challenge social exclusion. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • In most situations no, you are oblivious to what other people are doing around you because you are so involved in your social media connections. (bartleby.com)
  • With the growing popularity of the internet and social media websites, people have utilized these as new channels to express their thoughts on different political issues. (bartleby.com)
  • The more social ties people have at an early age, the better their health is at the beginnings and ends of their lives, according to a new study from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. (medicalxpress.com)
  • The Social Mirror project is being piloted in the Knowle West community to link people aged 65 plus and 18-25 to local activities that could help their health and wellbeing. (kwmc.org.uk)
  • We're trialing Social Mirror at the William Budd Health Centre over a 12-month period and hope to reach 300 people by the end of March 2014. (kwmc.org.uk)
  • Social Mirror is a way of linking local people to local activities and groups, using local knowledge. (kwmc.org.uk)
  • It can provide a sense of purpose and comfort on top of creating a social network of like-minded people. (alternativesforseniors.com)
  • People with dAD are more likely than those with MDD to show a decline in their enjoyment of social contacts or customary activities, but are less likely to express or experience guilt or feel suicidal. (wikipedia.org)
  • This theory aims to explain why people sometimes prefer staying alone but at other times like get involved in social interactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Traditionally, privacy is regarded as a state of social withdrawal (i.e., avoiding people). (wikipedia.org)
  • At the optimum level of privacy, we can experience the desired solitude when we want to be alone or enjoy the desired social contact when we want to be with people. (wikipedia.org)
  • one's
  • These technological advancements have made it easier to send a message to family and friends, create new links in a social network, and express one's opinion about anything under the sun. (bartleby.com)
  • Another noteworthy type of isolation is referred to as "temporal bracketing", in which some perceived failure or shortcoming is buried away in one's past, effectively removing its impact on the current self. (wikipedia.org)
  • people's
  • We're working with the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Commerce and Manufactures ( RSA ) as part of a research and action project to improve people's social inclusion. (kwmc.org.uk)
  • Research
  • Last week the AARP Public Policy Institute (PPI) sponsored a Solutions Forum on Capitol Hill (view recording HERE) that put the spotlight on groundbreaking research showing how much social isolation-lack of meaningful contacts with others-costs the Medicare program. (aarp.org)
  • The researches point out hat they intend to focus further research on researching the specific cell types in which these genetic changes are occurring, and then targeting the pathways that connect the stress hormones to their detrimental effects rather than to suggest that cancer patients should maintain strong social contacts. (blastmagazine.com)
  • This interdisciplinary research illustrates that the social environme. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Further research will be needed for accounts of isolation to be considered fully concrete. (wikipedia.org)
  • Areas of scientific research include field of personality's social-psychological adaptation and readaptation in terms of transformational changes in contemporary society. (wikipedia.org)
  • psychologist
  • Melvin Seeman (born 1918) is an American social psychologist and emeritus professor of sociology at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). (wikipedia.org)
  • Privacy regulation theory was developed by social psychologist Irwin Altman in 1975. (wikipedia.org)
  • mood
  • James S. House, Psychosomatic Medicine, Issue 2, Volume 63, Page(s) 273 - 274 In the case of mood-related isolation, the individual may isolate during a depressive episode only to 'surface' when their mood improves. (wikipedia.org)
  • participation
  • Moreover, the absence of social contacts and social participation can increase stress level and lead to difficult in sleep, negative impact on metabolic, neural and hormonal regulations (Dawkes & Simpkin 2013). (bartleby.com)
  • the constraints on and channels for social participation and the preferences for preventing and responding to isolation. (duke.edu)
  • problem
  • In two separate panels, participants in the packed room heard from experts who discussed the global problem of social isolation-or lack of meaningful contacts with others-among older adults. (aarp.org)
  • Studies also have shown that social isolation is a growing problem in developed countries. (eurekalert.org)
  • Different societies or health care staffs can have different beliefs regarding acceptable living standards, making self-neglect a serious and complex problem requiring clinical, social, and ethical decisions in its management and treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Services are based in psychiatric hospitals or in the community, and assessments are carried out by psychiatrists, psychologists, and clinical social workers, using various methods such as psychometric tests but often relying on observation and questioning. (wikipedia.org)
  • life
  • Social Networking: "How Does It Affect My Life? (bartleby.com)
  • All too often for these individuals, a once-normal social life is thrown to the wayside and replaced with doctors' appointments and treatment regimens. (curetoday.com)
  • stress
  • Others have found that a majority of women gain weight after a diagnosis of breast cancer, and it seems likely that stress, even if it is not from social isolation, may play a role," she added. (medindia.net)
  • The team observed that in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster, social isolation leads to sleep loss, which in turn leads to cellular stress and the activation of a defense mechanism called the unfolded protein response (UPR). (eurekalert.org)
  • circumstances
  • citation needed] These alternate models emphasize cultural and social values and personal circumstances, and posit that self-neglect develops over time and can be rooted in family relationships and cultural values. (wikipedia.org)
  • lead
  • Social isolation can actually change the expression of genes important in the growth of mammary gland tumors, according to Dr. Suzanne D. Conzen, an associate professor of medicine at the University of Chicago and the study's lead author. (drugs.com)
  • networks
  • Did you know that fifty-four percent of companies prohibit the use of social networking, but fifty-seven percent of employees admit to using social networks during work time for personal use? (bartleby.com)
  • Social theory is also influenced in a lesser role to emphasis on qualitative impact of social support networks for recovery. (wikipedia.org)
  • fear
  • This period of socialization is the time when puppies form social bonds, learn to explore and learn when/how to base fear. (wikipedia.org)