• animal behavior
  • The types of social behaviour include the following: Collective animal behavior involves the coordinated behavior of large groups of similar animals as well as emergent properties of these groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • At once instructive and compelling, this theme-spanning book reveals the complex nature of maturity in scores of social species and shows that animal behavior often displays the same diversity we find in ourselves. (jhu.edu)
  • To do this, you may need help, both from your veterinarian and from an animal behavior specialist who is knowledgeable in cat behavior. (paws.org)
  • You may need professional help from an animal behavior specialist to successfully implement these techniques. (paws.org)
  • He has been elected Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science for sustained and outstanding distinguished contributions to psychological sciences, and Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science for distinguished contributions to the integrative study of animal behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • primate behavior
  • Since its establishment in 1993, the La Suerte Biological Field Station has been visited by more than 1,300 students from across the United States, Canada, and all over the world to study primate behavior and ecology, tropical rainforest ecology and conservation. (goabroad.com)
  • The field station encompasses 1,000 acres and includes a mosaic of primary and secondary tropical rainforest, riparian habitats, and areas of human use, and is inhabited by wild groups of three species of nonhuman primates, making it an ideal location in which to study primate behavior and diversity and the effects of anthropogenic habitat modifications on wildlife. (goabroad.com)
  • Some of his work has elucidated the neuroendocrine regulation of primate behavior while other research has investigated its evolutionary significance. (wikipedia.org)
  • Evolutionary Theory and Primate Behavior includes a collection of essays illustrating evolutionary analyses of major aspects of primate socioecology and behavior including feeding, social, and reproductive strategies. (wikipedia.org)
  • ants
  • Even species with less complex brains, such as ants, may have behaviors serving similar general functions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fighting ants, giant solider termites, and foraging worker ants recently discovered in 100-million-year-old amber provide direct evidence for advanced social behavior in ancient ants and termites-two groups that are immensely successful because of their ability to organize in hierarchies. (amnh.org)
  • All ants and termites are social, and they are ubiquitous across terrestrial landscapes, with thousands of described species and probably even more that we haven't yet found. (amnh.org)
  • The behavior of these fossil ants, frozen for 100 million years, resolves any ambiguity regarding sociality and diversity in the earliest ants. (amnh.org)
  • Researchers tracked color-coded ants, using an algorithm to analyze following behavior. (eurekalert.org)
  • The result, severe deficiencies in the ants' social behaviors and their ability to survive within a colony, both sheds light on a key facet of social evolution and demonstrates the feasibility and utility of genome editing in ants. (eurekalert.org)
  • Once the ants successfully made it to the adult phase, we noticed a shift in their behavior almost immediately. (eurekalert.org)
  • overt
  • Psychological science in the 21st century can, and should, become not only the science of overt behavior, and not only the science of the mind, but also the science of the brain,' concluded the experts. (enotalone.com)
  • situations
  • Teresa Doyle and Ursula Bellugi of the Salk Institute, along with Julie Korenberg and John Graham of UCLA and Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, found that children with Williams syndrome scored significantly higher on tests measuring behavior in social situations, including their ability to remember names and faces, eagerness to please others, empathy with others' emotions and tendency to approach strangers. (scienceagogo.com)
  • In a large three-year project, we are extending these techniques to create reusable social behavior that can be dynamically retargeted to new social situations in the context of a full-body Kinect-driven game experience. (gdcvault.com)
  • As such, when strong situations (situations where situational strength is high) exist, the relationship between personality variables (for example, extraversion, risk-taking behaviors, etc...) and behaviors is reduced, because no matter what the personality of the individual is, they will act in a way dictated by the situation. (wikipedia.org)
  • When weak situations exist, there is less structure and more ambiguity with respect to what behaviors to perform. (wikipedia.org)
  • In sum, situations have the ability to restrict the expression of individual differences in terms of actual behaviors. (wikipedia.org)
  • determinants
  • instead, the complexity of human behavior and its determinants must be studied from a perspective that accounts for the simultaneous and interactive impact of individual differences and situational characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • The study takes aim at the genes that may lead to the marked extroverted behavior seen in children with Williams syndrome, demonstrating that "hyper-sociability" - especially the drive to greet and interact with strangers - follows a unique developmental path. (scienceagogo.com)
  • Here we not only have shown hyper-social behavior as a hallmark symptom that follows a characteristic developmental course in Williams syndrome, but we may be closer to identifying the genes involved in regulating that behavior. (scienceagogo.com)
  • We don't know at this point whether these genes are involved in regulating social behavior in the general population, or whether their involvement is specific to Williams syndrome," said Bellugi. (scienceagogo.com)
  • A gene set enrichment analysis used to search for the pathways in T cells that might mediate the observed social behavior strongly implicated IFN-γ-related genes. (jax.org)
  • feelings
  • Social rewards and feelings of love also may stimulate the region. (enotalone.com)
  • Jean Decety says, 'The study raises the intriguing possibility that loneliness may result from reduced reward-related activity in the ventral striatum in response to social rewards,' leading to speculation that activity in the ventral striatum may even promote feelings of loneliness. (enotalone.com)
  • By addressing communication deficits, the person will be supported to express their needs and feelings by means other than challenging behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • males
  • Males establish social hierarchies through "necking", which are combat bouts where the neck is used as a weapon. (wikipedia.org)
  • Collective
  • Collective Behavior and Social Movements (CBSM) is a section of the American Sociological Association (ASA) composed of sociologists who focus on the study of emerging and extra-institutional group phenomena. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the 1970s, there was a desire among some members of the ASA to establish a group that would study collective behavior and social movements as a fused topic. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, John Lofland, who was central in the effort to establish an entirely separate section within the ASA for this cause, responded adamantly that the title should pay homage to the traditional link between collective behavior and social movements. (wikipedia.org)
  • The bond between collective behavior and social movements had formed earlier in the twentieth century through the work of Robert Ezra Park and Herbert Blumer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, in 1978, a formal petition was circulated to create a new section, which would be called Collective Behavior and Social Movements (CBSM). (wikipedia.org)
  • In recent years, the relevance of "CB" (Collective Behavior) in "CBSM" has been questioned. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, as the section gains more international attendance, the link between collective behavior and social movements has become more obscure, given that the traditional American sociological link between the two areas is tenuous for non-US academics. (wikipedia.org)
  • The CBSM section of the ASA gives the following awards: Charles Tilly Award for Best Book: Established in 1986, this award recognizes a significant published contribution in the field of collective behavior and social movements. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1998. "Collective Behavior and Social Movements in the Postmodern Age: Looking Backward to Look Forward. (wikipedia.org)
  • neural
  • These observations have suggested linkages between immune responses and social behavior, but specific mechanisms that connect peripheral immunity with neural circuit function have not been validated. (jax.org)
  • Now, a study published in the July 2016 issue of Nature from a research team lead by Dr. Vladimir Litvak at the University of Massachusetts and Dr. Jonathan Kipnis at the University of Virginia demonstrates a critical role for meningeal interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in mediating both neural function and social behavior ( Filiano et al, 2016 ). (jax.org)
  • Their results suggest that social deficits symptomatic in a variety of neuropsychatric disorders may result from the dysfunctional immune responses altering neural circuit homeostasis. (jax.org)
  • cognitive
  • Secondly, behavior is learned from the environment through the process of observational learning In and out of the classroom children learn through a four step pattern Bandura formulated through a cognitive and operant view. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reciprocal cooperation, meaning an investment in a partner, which is later reciprocated, is thought to require complex cognitive and social skills. (medindia.net)
  • symptoms
  • Interestingly, both dysfunctional social behaviors and immune system dysregulation are clinical symptoms associated with several neurologic and mental disorders. (jax.org)
  • Symptoms can vary depending on several factors, such as trauma severity, the amount of social support, and additional life stresses. (wikipedia.org)
  • mice
  • The group first investigated social behavior in mice devoid of a functional adaptive immune system. (jax.org)
  • Wild-type mice preferentially investigated the mouse over the object, whereas the SCID mice did not show a social preference. (jax.org)
  • Interestingly, when the 4-week-old, immune-deficient SCID mice were repopulated with lymphocytes from wild-type donors, their social preferences increased to the level of the wild-type group. (jax.org)
  • 002287 ) showed social deficits and non-anxious behavior similar to the SCID mice. (jax.org)
  • Further, repopulating SCID mice with lymphocytes from IFN-γ knockout donors did not restore the treated animals' social preferences to wild-type levels. (jax.org)
  • A single injection of recombinant IFN-γ into the cerebrospinal fluid of IFN-γ knockout mice, however, restored the animals' social preferences by 24 hours post-injection. (jax.org)
  • Microglia were excluded as the IFN-γ source mediating social behaviors in mice, because mice with cre-recombinase mediated, microglia-specific deletion of STAT1,a signaling molecule downstream of IFN-γ, did not show social deficits. (jax.org)
  • Treatment with diazepam, a benzodiazepine that augments GABAergic neurotransmission, also rescued social behavior in IFN-γ receptor knockout mice. (jax.org)
  • researchers
  • To examine higher insect social order, researchers looked into the potential evolutionary history of a "foraging gene" in honey bees (Apis mellifera). (wikipedia.org)
  • interaction
  • New research published in the FASEB Journal ( http://www.fasebj.org ) suggests that these receptors also play an important role in social interaction and the ability to choose between competing motivations. (redorbit.com)
  • This new approach combines the social action retargeting of CiF (the architecture behind Prom Week) and the behavioral dynamism of ABL to create reusable, real-time social behaviors for first-person character interaction. (gdcvault.com)
  • study
  • The current study is the first one that used fMRI scans to measure activity in the brain in combination with data about social isolation, or loneliness. (enotalone.com)
  • behavioral
  • Mischel's work led to an important shift in social scientists' thinking about the behavioral expression of personality. (wikipedia.org)
  • deficits
  • These results suggest that social deficits derived from IFN-γ deficiency may be linked to a concomitant loss of GABAergic neuron-mediated synaptic inhibition. (jax.org)
  • influences
  • Human factors and social influences are important in starting and maintaining such activities. (wikipedia.org)
  • In books and articles on the topic, Mischel stressed the importance of better understanding how, when, and why individual differences are most likely to be important predictors of behavior, and when they are more likely to be nullified by situational influences. (wikipedia.org)
  • group
  • Group living offers many benefits, including companionship and shared resources for food and safety, but it also comes with drawbacks, such as social conflict and an increased likelihood for infectious disease transmission. (jax.org)
  • In a fission-fusion society, the main parent group can fracture (fission) into smaller stable subgroups or individuals to adapt to environmental or social circumstances. (wikipedia.org)
  • individual
  • So how might seemingly altruistic behavior have evolved, given the conflict with individual fitness? (wwnorton.com)
  • Reproduction: the individual copies or emulates the behavior that is observed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Permanent social networks consist of all individual members of a faunal community and often varies to track changes in their environment and based on individual animal dynamics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Situational strength is said to result in psychological pressure on the individual to engage in and/or refrain from particular behaviors. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is important to note that Mischel did not imply that people show no consistencies in behavior, or that individual differences are unimportant. (wikipedia.org)
  • He further argued that individual differences are most likely to directly affect behavior "when the situation is ambiguously structured. (wikipedia.org)
  • gene
  • Those genetically modified to lack the nicotinic receptor gene for a widespread subunit called beta2 subtype, seemed to favor social contact rather than the investigation of a novel environment. (redorbit.com)
  • Of particular interest are differential gene expression of mRNA (transcriptomics) and protein transcription (proteomics) that correspond to changes in behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • Honey bees have a variant of the same foraging gene that controls the onset of foraging behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • To further dissect the role of odorant receptors in ant communication and social behavior, the Kronauer lab disrupted a gene called orco , required for the function of all odorant receptors. (eurekalert.org)
  • changes
  • If your cat's behavior changes suddenly, your first step should always be to contact your veterinarian for a thorough health examination. (paws.org)
  • among
  • This behavior is so far unique among fishes and appears to be based on reciprocal cooperation between pair members. (medindia.net)
  • often
  • Traffic rules dictate how people are supposed to act when they see a red light, and this influence often prevents people from engaging in behaviors that are consistent with their personality. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • That can translate to an inability to make friends, engage in routine conversations, or pick up on the social cues that are second nature to most people. (iran-daily.com)
  • Due to social constructs surrounding health, the belief that being skinny is healthy and discrimination against those perceived to be 'unhealthy', people who are considered overweight or obese on the BMI scale face many social challenges. (wikipedia.org)