• adolescents
  • This article presents research derived from a nationwide study conducted at the University of Amsterdam into the psychosocial adjustment and the meaning of social support for Dutch adolescents with visual impairments. (afb.org)
  • The findings indicate that social support, especially the support of peers, is important to adolescents with visual impairments. (afb.org)
  • More subtle determinant of group membership, such as shared interests and values, take precedence as adolescents develop more sophisticated, abstract cognitive functions (more here), which allow them to categorize individuals in more subtle ways and better interpret social interactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • psychology
  • PhD, education in private clinical practice) by states, degrees and certifications are offered in fields such as psychiatric rehabilitation (MS, PhD), BA psychology (liberal arts, experimental/clinical/existential/community)to MA licensing is now more popular, BA (to PhD) mid-level program management, qualified civil service professionals, and social workers remain the mainstay of community admissions procedures (licensed by state, often generic training) in the US. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is evidence that there are two main forms of personal popularity that social psychology recognizes, sociometric popularity and perceived popularity. (wikipedia.org)
  • peers
  • The results demonstrated that boys with conduct disorders are distinctive from their control peers on several aspects of social adjustment and academic competence, even at the first stages of their academic experience. (ed.gov)
  • Critics of unschooling see it as an extreme educational philosophy, with concerns that unschooled children will lack the social skills, structure, and motivation of their schooled peers, while proponents of unschooling say exactly the opposite is true: self-directed education in a natural environment better equips a child to handle the "real world. (wikipedia.org)
  • Scale
  • The purpose of this revision was to standardize the test, account for sex differences in performance, achieve correlations with the Binet-Simon scale and the US Army test and estimate social capability and industrial aptitude. (wikipedia.org)
  • exclusion
  • It is hypothesized that people with lower self-esteem, as compared with people with higher self-esteem, tended to overgeneralize their immediate experience of exclusion and to show more negative attitudes toward future social interactions with any persons, those who has excluded them, strangers or their partners. (nii.ac.jp)
  • adolescence
  • During late adolescence, the organized clique structure typically dissolves into associated sets of couples, which then remain the primary social unit into and throughout adulthood. (wikipedia.org)
  • high
  • The purpose of this study is to measure and compare the degree of personal and social adjustment which high school girls exhibited during a 'split semester' and a 'continuous semester. (unt.edu)
  • The course of neurocognition and social functioning in individuals at ultra high risk for psychosis. (biomedsearch.com)
  • There are also indications that individuals may hold certain beliefs about themselves, their internal states, and their social world (including striving to meet high standards despite it causing distress) that may make them vulnerable during changing mood states in the face of relevant life events. (wikipedia.org)
  • skills
  • Community integration in this context (schools) refers to opportunities "to learn practical social and community living skills (and job training) in a wide variety of community settings" (p. 13). (wikipedia.org)
  • role
  • On average, 50% demonstrated improvement in social and role functioning over the follow-up period, while the other half showed either stability or decline in functioning. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Bengt Nirje and the late Wolf Wolfensberger of the US are internationally known for their concept of normalization and social role valorization, with a particular emphasis on physical and social integration. (wikipedia.org)
  • physical
  • Only physical functioning independently affected social adjustment. (e-chnr.org)
  • Theorists have differentiated types and levels of integration in special education as physical, functional, social, community and organizational. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anders Gustavsson (ca. 1990) of Sweden has indicated that physical integration best describes the common use of the term "integration", with social integration the struggle for "equality and quality in life. (wikipedia.org)
  • control
  • As Scarr & Weinberg (1976) note, transracial adoption studies only control for family environment, not social environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • family
  • Work-family balance in the U.S. differs significantly for families of different social class. (wikipedia.org)
  • Family structure (how the family is organized) historically has been influenced by social-level forces, many of them economic. (wikipedia.org)
  • groups
  • The major difference is that these reputation-based groups do not necessarily interact with each other, whereas members of a clique do interact with one another and have frequent social interactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • While popularity is a trait often ascribed to an individual, it is an inherently social phenomenon and thus can only be understood in the context of groups of people. (wikipedia.org)
  • problems
  • ATs were operationalized by using the withdrawn + social + thought problems T scores from the Child Behavior Checklist. (aappublications.org)
  • If Math is your niche then choose the Math 180, if you are interested in Social Problems then consider Soc 180. (csusb.edu)
  • develop
  • There is some indication that once mania has begun to develop, social stressors, including criticism from significant others, can further contribute. (wikipedia.org)