• mites
  • Mange /ˈmeɪndʒ/ is a type of skin diseases caused by parasitic mites. (wikipedia.org)
  • Parasitic mites that cause mange in mammals embed themselves either in skin or hair follicles in the animal, depending upon their genus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dogs with chronic sarcoptic mange are often in poor condition, and in both animals and humans, immune suppression from starvation or any other disease causes this type of mange to develop into a highly crusted form in which the burden of mites is far higher than in healthy specimens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Veterinarians usually attempt diagnosis with skin scrapings from multiple areas, which are then examined under a microscope for mites. (wikipedia.org)
  • The treatment is based upon the hypothesis that parasitic mites of the genus Demodex play a role in rosacea. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mites penetrate the skin and feed on skin cells that are broken down through an enzyme they secrete from their mouthparts, but they will then leave the host. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mites can also affect the health of the birds indirectly, as they may serve as vectors for diseases such as Salmonellosis, avian spirochaetosis and Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fleas
  • Owing to the rapid multiplication of fleas, dogs that are not regularly groomed or washed, soon become swarmed with these pests, consequently the severe irritation they produce upon the skin causes the animal to lose condition , whilst the scratching and biting destroys its coat. (bookdome.com)
  • Males are still mobile after a blood meal like other fleas, but the female flea burrows head-first into the host's skin, leaving the caudal tip of its abdomen visible through an orifice in a skin lesion. (wikipedia.org)
  • insects
  • As a veterinary surgeon he was frequently confronted by the horrendous condition of farm animals caused by various parasitic insects, in particular a skin disease which afflicted sheep known as sheep scab - at the time treated very ineffectually by only ointments composed of tobacco stalk and brimstone emulsified in goose fat. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • It is caused by chemical reactions that occur in the skin and stimulate the nerves, causing the brain to feel the itch. (petplace.com)
  • Skin damage can occur from the dog's intense scratching and biting. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although louse-borne (epidemic) typhus is no longer widespread, outbreaks of this disease still occur during times of war, civil unrest, natural or man-made disasters, and in prisons where people live together in unsanitary conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • lesion
  • Tungiasis causes skin inflammation, severe pain, itching, and a lesion at the site of infection that is characterized by a black dot at the center of a swollen red lesion. (drscabies.com)
  • The treatment of ATL must heal skin lesions and prevent late mucosal lesion development. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Diagnosis
  • Skin disorders may be primary or secondary (due to scratching, itch) in nature, making diagnosis complicated. (wikipedia.org)
  • vectors
  • They are also vectors (transmitters) of other diseases and can spread epidemic typhus, trench fever, and louse-borne relapsing fever. (wikipedia.org)
  • sheep
  • Thus, mange includes mite-associated skin disease in domestic animals (cats and dogs), in livestock (such as sheep scab), and in wild animals (for example, coyotes, cougars, and bears). (wikipedia.org)
  • The plant can cause photosensitisation, a serious skin condition of sheep called alveld, "elf fire", in Norway. (wikipedia.org)
  • Richard Mabey Flora Britannica Handbook of Plant and Fungal Toxicants by J. P. Felix D'Mello George B. B. Mitchell, 'Non-parasitic skin diseases of sheep' In Pract. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment
  • It offers color photos of common skin diseases in both the dog and cat, offering insights on testing, treatment options, and life cycles of diseases. (wiley.com)
  • This study will evaluate and treat patients with filarial infections to explore in depth the immunology of the disease, including susceptibility to infection , disease development, and response to treatment. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • into details about these numerous additions to the catalogue of diseases, to the stock of pathological ideas, and to the resources of treatment. (wikisource.org)
  • Skin disorders of dogs vary from acute, self-limiting problems to chronic or long-lasting problems requiring life-time treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • In cats this includes one of the most devastating cat skin disorders, feline acquired skin fragility syndrome, which can come from starvation or over-treatment with cortisone-like drugs or with diabetes, FIP or Cushings Disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • inflammation
  • Any skin condition that causes inflammation can cause pruritus. (petplace.com)
  • When the nerves of the skin are stimulated by mediators of inflammation to a level below that threshold, the dog will not scratch. (petplace.com)
  • ivermectin
  • A related and older drug ivermectin is also effective and can be given by mouth for two to four weekly treatments or until two negative skin scrapings are achieved. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ivermectin is contraindicated in children under the age of five, or those who weigh less than 15 kilograms (33 pounds) and those who are breastfeeding, and have a liver or kidney disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Atopic
  • Ear and skin infections with the bacteria Staphylococcus pseudintermedius and the yeast Malassezia pachydermatis are common secondary to atopic dermatitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • This category also includes hypersensitivity disorders and eosinophilic skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis, miliary dermatitis and feline eosinophilic granuloma and skin diseases caused by autoimmunity, such as pemphigus and discoid lupus. (wikipedia.org)
  • lesions
  • However, severe pruritus leads to intense scratching, which may result in painful skin lesions that may become infected. (petplace.com)
  • If this continues beyond one day and leads to lesions such as hair loss, reddening of the skin and obvious pain or discomfort, have your dog evaluated by your veterinarian. (petplace.com)
  • Complete cure of ulcerated lesions is defined as 100% re-epithelialization or a measurement of ulceration of 0 x 0 mm. non-ulcerated treated lesions will also be measured to monitor total area of exposure of lesions to study drug and will be evaluated for cure (the absence of raised area on the skin). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Similarly, copper can affect coat health of cats, when deficient will cause fading of coat colour, and weakened skin leading to lesions. (wikipedia.org)
  • veterinary
  • Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, March 2009)"Approximately 500 excellent color photographs illustrate the diseases in each chapter. (wiley.com)
  • This article provides an overview of parasitic flies from a veterinary perspective, with emphasis on the disease causing relationships between these flies and their host animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • host's
  • Feeding by adult flies on the blood of their hosts exposes the hosts to pathogenic organisms that are infecting the fly, this can lead to acute disease of the host's blood and other organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • irritation
  • A hot spot, or acute moist dermatitis, is an acutely inflamed and infected area of skin irritation created and made worse by a dog licking and biting at itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • Crusty
  • The skin of a cat deficient in zinc would likely have erythema, hair loss, crusty and scaly skin on its limbs or tail. (wikipedia.org)
  • scaly
  • On the other hand, itching all over the body can be caused by something as simple as bathing too often, which removes the skin's natural oils and may make the skin too dry and scaly. (encyclopedia.com)
  • If a cat has a protein deficiency the cat will lose weight, then show poor coat condition such as scaly skin, dull, thinning, weak, and patchy hair. (wikipedia.org)
  • A cat will be deficient for many months prior to seeing clinical signs in the skin, after which the skin will become scaly, and greasy while the coat will become dull. (wikipedia.org)
  • A deficiency in vitamin A will result in a poor coat, with hair loss, with scaly and thickened skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phase
  • In its parasitic phase it has significant impact on its host, which include humans and certain other mammalian species. (wikipedia.org)
  • dog's
  • The condition of a dog's skin and coat are also an important indicator of its general health. (wikipedia.org)
  • condition
  • In fact, the act of scratching itself may stimulate these inflammatory reactions in the skin and make the condition worse. (petplace.com)
  • Sunlight worsens the condition, but the black head and ears of the Suffolk limit sunlight down to the otherwise exposed skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Each chapter looks at a different type of skin disease with descriptions of clinical presentations and a guide for diagnostic tests for each. (wiley.com)
  • disorders
  • Cat skin disorders may be grouped into categories according to the causes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nutritional related skin disorders usually result in excesses or not enough oil production known as sebum, and keratinization toughening of the outer layer of the skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • A deficiency in the zinc mainly results in skin disorders in adult cats, but also results in growth oddities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Signs
  • Signs of hypervitaminosis A are overly sensitive skin, and neck pain causing the cat to be unwilling to groom its self, resulting in a poor coat. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alpha The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) is a coding of diseases and signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO). (wikipedia.org)
  • secondary
  • In cases where there is insufficient immune responses the disease is usually described by the secondary disease that results. (wikipedia.org)
  • A hot spot can manifest and spread rapidly in a matter of hours as secondary Staphylococcus infection causes the top layers of the skin to break down and as pus becomes trapped in the hair. (wikipedia.org)