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  • mites
  • Parasitic mites that cause mange in mammals embed themselves either in skin or hair follicles in the animal, depending upon their genus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dogs with chronic sarcoptic mange are often in poor condition, and in both animals and humans, immune suppression from starvation or any other disease causes this type of mange to develop into a highly crusted form in which the burden of mites is far higher than in healthy specimens. (wikipedia.org)
  • Veterinarians usually attempt diagnosis with skin scrapings from multiple areas, which are then examined under a microscope for mites. (wikipedia.org)
  • More recent evidence supports its use against parasitic arthropods and insects: Mites such as scabies: It is usually limited to cases that prove to be resistant to topical treatments or that present in an advanced state (such as Norwegian scabies). (wikipedia.org)
  • The treatment is based upon the hypothesis that parasitic mites of the genus Demodex play a role in rosacea. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mites penetrate the skin and feed on skin cells that are broken down through an enzyme they secrete from their mouthparts, but they will then leave the host. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mites can also affect the health of the birds indirectly, as they may serve as vectors for diseases such as Salmonellosis, avian spirochaetosis and Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Fleas
  • Owing to the rapid multiplication of fleas, dogs that are not regularly groomed or washed, soon become swarmed with these pests, consequently the severe irritation they produce upon the skin causes the animal to lose condition , whilst the scratching and biting destroys its coat. (bookdome.com)
  • Males are still mobile after a blood meal like other fleas, but the female flea burrows head-first into the host's skin, leaving the caudal tip of its abdomen visible through an orifice in a skin lesion. (wikipedia.org)
  • insects
  • As a veterinary surgeon he was frequently confronted by the horrendous condition of farm animals caused by various parasitic insects, in particular a skin disease which afflicted sheep known as sheep scab - at the time treated very ineffectually by only ointments composed of tobacco stalk and brimstone emulsified in goose fat. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • It is caused by chemical reactions that occur in the skin and stimulate the nerves, causing the brain to feel the itch. (petplace.com)
  • Skin damage can occur from the dog's intense scratching and biting. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although louse-borne (epidemic) typhus is no longer widespread, outbreaks of this disease still occur during times of war, civil unrest, natural or man-made disasters, and in prisons where people live together in unsanitary conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • vectors
  • They are also vectors (transmitters) of other diseases and can spread epidemic typhus, trench fever, and louse-borne relapsing fever. (wikipedia.org)
  • sheep
  • Thus, mange includes mite-associated skin disease in domestic animals (cats and dogs), in livestock (such as sheep scab), and in wild animals (for example, coyotes, cougars, and bears). (wikipedia.org)
  • The plant can cause photosensitisation, a serious skin condition of sheep called alveld, "elf fire", in Norway. (wikipedia.org)
  • Richard Mabey Flora Britannica Handbook of Plant and Fungal Toxicants by J. P. Felix D'Mello George B. B. Mitchell, 'Non-parasitic skin diseases of sheep' In Pract. (wikipedia.org)
  • ivermectin
  • A related and older drug ivermectin is also effective and can be given by mouth for two to four weekly treatments or until two negative skin scrapings are achieved. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ivermectin is contraindicated in children under the age of five, or those who weigh less than 15 kilograms (33 pounds) and those who are breastfeeding, and have a liver or kidney disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • veterinary
  • Journal of the American Veterinary Medical Association, March 2009)"Approximately 500 excellent color photographs illustrate the diseases in each chapter. (wiley.com)
  • This article provides an overview of parasitic flies from a veterinary perspective, with emphasis on the disease causing relationships between these flies and their host animals. (wikipedia.org)
  • inflammation
  • Any skin condition that causes inflammation can cause pruritus. (petplace.com)
  • When the nerves of the skin are stimulated by mediators of inflammation to a level below that threshold, the dog will not scratch. (petplace.com)
  • severe
  • However, severe pruritus leads to intense scratching, which may result in painful skin lesions that may become infected. (petplace.com)
  • mite
  • Cheyletiellosis is an itchy skin condition caused by the cheyletiella mite. (petplace.com)
  • The mite plays an important part in the disease, however, by preparing the ground for the invasion of the bacterium by dilating the follicles and sweat-glands, and possibly also carries and introduces the germ. (wikipedia.org)
  • They dig into and through the skin, causing intense itching from an allergic reaction to the mite, and crusting that can quickly become infected. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many dogs with house dust mite allergy have perennial disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Provides information on this skin disease caused by a small mite, and its treatment. (dmoztools.net)
  • VeterinaryPartner.com provides information on this itchy disease caused by a small mite and how to treat it. (dmoztools.net)
  • feline
  • This category also includes hypersensitivity disorders and eosinophilic skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis, miliary dermatitis and feline eosinophilic granuloma and skin diseases caused by autoimmunity, such as pemphigus and discoid lupus. (wikipedia.org)
  • In cats this includes one of the most devastating cat skin disorders, feline acquired skin fragility syndrome, which can come from starvation or over-treatment with cortisone-like drugs or with diabetes, FIP or Cushings Disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment
  • Skin disorders of dogs vary from acute, self-limiting problems to chronic or long-lasting problems requiring life-time treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • host's
  • Feeding by adult flies on the blood of their hosts exposes the hosts to pathogenic organisms that are infecting the fly, this can lead to acute disease of the host's blood and other organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • secondary
  • This disease is often not pruritic, but can lead to a secondary bacterial infection of the skin ( pyoderma ), which may be itchy. (petplace.com)
  • Pyoderma can be superficial or deep and is often secondary to another skin disease. (petplace.com)
  • Secondary skin infection is also common. (wikipedia.org)
  • In cases where there is insufficient immune responses the disease is usually described by the secondary disease that results. (wikipedia.org)
  • A hot spot can manifest and spread rapidly in a matter of hours as secondary Staphylococcus infection causes the top layers of the skin to break down and as pus becomes trapped in the hair. (wikipedia.org)
  • Phase
  • In its parasitic phase it has significant impact on its host, which include humans and certain other mammalian species. (wikipedia.org)
  • dog's
  • The condition of a dog's skin and coat are also an important indicator of its general health. (wikipedia.org)
  • condition
  • In fact, the act of scratching itself may stimulate these inflammatory reactions in the skin and make the condition worse. (petplace.com)
  • Sunlight worsens the condition, but the black head and ears of the Suffolk limit sunlight down to the otherwise exposed skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • If a cat has a protein deficiency the cat will lose weight, then show poor coat condition such as scaly skin, dull, thinning, weak, and patchy hair. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute
  • A hot spot, or acute moist dermatitis, is an acutely inflamed and infected area of skin irritation created and made worse by a dog licking and biting at itself. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • Dealing with all common skin diseases in both the dog and the cat, particular attention is paid to the differences between the two species. (wiley.com)
  • Common side effects include red eyes, dry skin, and burning skin. (wikipedia.org)
  • The disease is common in 30 African countries, six Latin American countries, and Yemen. (wikipedia.org)
  • Skin disorders are among the most common health problems in dogs, and have many causes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pemphigus foliaceus is the most common autoimmune disease of the dog. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cat skin disorders are among the most common health problems in cats. (wikipedia.org)
  • Skin disorders in cats have many causes, and many of the common skin disorders that afflict people have a counterpart in cats. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another common skin infection is cat bite abscess. (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Each chapter looks at a different type of skin disease with descriptions of clinical presentations and a guide for diagnostic tests for each. (wiley.com)
  • A cat will be deficient for many months prior to seeing clinical signs in the skin, after which the skin will become scaly, and greasy while the coat will become dull. (wikipedia.org)
  • Signs
  • Signs of hypervitaminosis A are overly sensitive skin, and neck pain causing the cat to be unwilling to groom its self, resulting in a poor coat. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alpha The International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems 10th Revision (ICD-10) is a coding of diseases and signs, symptoms, abnormal findings, complaints, social circumstances and external causes of injury or diseases, as classified by the World Health Organization (WHO). (wikipedia.org)
  • mainly
  • A deficiency in the zinc mainly results in skin disorders in adult cats, but also results in growth oddities. (wikipedia.org)
  • hair
  • If this continues beyond one day and leads to lesions such as hair loss, reddening of the skin and obvious pain or discomfort, have your dog evaluated by your veterinarian. (petplace.com)
  • The skin of a cat deficient in zinc would likely have erythema, hair loss, crusty and scaly skin on its limbs or tail. (wikipedia.org)
  • rapidly
  • Zinc is important for the skins function as it is involved in DNA and RNA, and therefore important for cells that divide rapidly. (wikipedia.org)
  • worms
  • Stories of other patients with autoimmune diseases, like Smith, who are deliberately infecting themselves with worms have surfaced. (go.com)
  • Once inside a person, the worms create larvae that make their way out to the skin, where they can infect the next black fly that bites the person. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are a number of ways to make the diagnosis, including: placing a biopsy of the skin in normal saline and watching for the larva to come out, looking in the eye for larvae, and looking within the bumps under the skin for adult worms. (wikipedia.org)
  • humans
  • One advantage of pig whipworms is that they don't cause disease in humans. (go.com)
  • Few experimental trials have evoked a response strong enough to protect against disease and the technique's usefulness remains to be proven in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • One of the largest fields in parasitology, medical parasitology is the subject which deals with the parasites that infect humans, the diseases caused by them, clinical picture and the response generated by humans against them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Determination of parasitic protein structures may help to better understand how these proteins function differently from homologous proteins in humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Transmission of disease through rodents can be spread to humans through direct handling and contact, or indirectly through rodents carrying the disease spread to ticks, mites, fleas (arboborne. (wikipedia.org)
  • Vector-borne zoonotic diseases are those that naturally infect wildlife and are then transmitted to humans through carriers, or vectors, such as mosquitoes or ticks. (wikipedia.org)
  • fungal
  • For example, the big-vein disease of lettuce was long thought to be caused by a member of the fungal division Chytridiomycota, namely Olpidium brassicae. (wikipedia.org)
  • worm
  • The pinworm (species Enterobius vermicularis), also known as threadworm (in the United Kingdom and Australasia) or seatworm, is a parasitic worm. (wikipedia.org)
  • They emerge from the anus, and while moving on the skin near the anus, the female pinworms deposit eggs either through (1) contracting and expelling the eggs, (2) dying and then disintegrating, or (3) bodily rupture due to the host scratching the worm. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1915, the physician Rodolfo Robles first linked the worm to eye disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancers
  • If skin cancer other than melanoma were included in total new cancers each year, it would account for around 40% of cases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Cancers are a large family of diseases that involve abnormal cell growth with the potential to invade or spread to other parts of the body. (wikipedia.org)
  • vaccine
  • However, attenuated forms of a pathogen can convert to a dangerous form and may cause disease in immunocompromised vaccine recipients (such as those with AIDS). (wikipedia.org)
  • In 1983, Enzo Paoletti and Dennis Panicali at the New York Department of Health devised a strategy to produce recombinant DNA vaccines by using genetic engineering to transform ordinary smallpox vaccine into vaccines that may be able to prevent other diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • A vaccine against the disease does not exist. (wikipedia.org)
  • eggs
  • Eight years ago, New Yorker Herbert Smith did the unthinkable -- he swallowed thousands of pig whipworm eggs in a desperate bid to quell his advancing Crohn's disease. (go.com)
  • bites
  • Rodent borne disease can be transmitted through different forms of contact such as rodent bites, scratches, urine, saliva, etc. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rat-bite fever is contacted by bites or scratches from an infected rodent, contaminated food or beverages with either bacteria, or by handling rodents with the disease, without necessariliy being bitten or scratched by the rodent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Instead, the woman becomes a parasitic monster whose victims transform into rabid zombies whose bites spread the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • vaccination
  • DNA vaccination is a technique for protecting against disease by injection with genetically engineered DNA so cells directly produce an antigen, producing a protective immunological response. (wikipedia.org)
  • populations
  • In the decade after it was first discovered in 1998, the disease devastated amphibian populations around the world, in a global decline towards multiple extinctions, part of the Holocene extinction. (wikipedia.org)
  • Warmer winters and increased rainfall will make it more likely for rodent populations to survive, therefore increasing the number of rodent reservoirs for disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The grass grub populations usually increase in a 3-5 year cycle before crashing usually due to a buildup of disease in the soil. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • The study of these diverse organisms means that the subject is often broken up into simpler, more focused units, which use common techniques, even if they are not studying the same organisms or diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • These flies live near rivers, hence the common name of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • The phenomenon is so common when DEC is used that this drug is the basis of a skin patch test used to confirm that diagnosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • disorders
  • Plasma cell dyscrasias (also termed plasma cell disorders and plasma cell proliferative diseases) are a spectrum of progressively more severe monoclonal gammopathies in which a clone or multiple clones of pre-malignant or malignant plasma cells (sometimes in association with lymphoplasmacytoid cells or B lymphocytes) over-produce and secrete into the blood stream a myeloma protein, i.e. an abnormal monoclonal antibody or portion thereof. (wikipedia.org)
  • prevention
  • The World Health Organization (WHO) states that control and prevention of vector-borne diseases are emphasizing "Integrated Vector Management (IVM)", which is an approach that looks at the links between health and environment, optimizing benefits to both. (wikipedia.org)
  • naturally
  • Vaccines have eliminated naturally occurring smallpox, and nearly eliminated polio, while other diseases, such as typhus, rotavirus, hepatitis A and B and others are well controlled. (wikipedia.org)
  • People
  • Bed bugs ( Cimex lectularius ) are small, flat, parasitic insects that feed solely on the blood of people and animals while they sleep. (floydcoia.org)
  • Diseases of poverty is a term sometimes used to collectively describe diseases, disabilities, and health conditions that are more prevalent among the poor than among wealthier people. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is classically an acute condition, appearing in infants, people taking antibiotics or immunosuppressant medications, or immunocompromising diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Palliative care is particularly important in people with advanced disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Efforts to eradicate the disease by treating entire groups of people twice a year are ongoing in a number of areas of the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • sometimes
  • This is done by fixing a urethra in the midway show, and with a tion of many neck or a patient make a certain famotidine generic discount card, the dis being brought very by passing hands much, or better, from skin to entrance, taking result sometimes to obliterate the local controversy. (f4dbshop.com)
  • forms
  • Once the zoospore reaches its host, it forms a cyst underneath the surface of the skin, and initiates the reproductive portion of its life cycle. (wikipedia.org)
  • causes
  • Glycogen storage disease type 13 causes muscle pain ( myalgia ). (nih.gov)
  • Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (/bəˌtreɪkoʊˈkɪtriəm ˈdɛndroʊbətaɪdɪs/ bə-TRAY-koh-KIT-ree-əm DEN-droh-bə-ty-dis), also known as Bd or the amphibian chytrid fungus, is a fungus that causes the disease chytridiomycosis in amphibians. (wikipedia.org)
  • Triatomine bugs are responsible for the transmission of a trypanosome, Trypanosoma cruzi, which causes Chagas Disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • diagnosis
  • Even the most careful individuals can find themselves with a positive HIV diagnosis, while others couldn't get the disease if they tried. (herbaltor.men)
  • occur
  • About 14.1 million new cases occur a year (not including skin cancer other than melanoma). (wikipedia.org)
  • Patient
  • The drug patch is placed on the skin, and if the patient is infected with O. volvulus microfilaria, localized pruritus and urticaria are seen at the application site. (wikipedia.org)
  • large
  • The disease complex they cause, known as leishmaniosis or leishmaniasis, is endemic in large areas of the tropics, subtropics, and the Mediterranean basin, affecting more than 98 countries. (springer.com)
  • In some draughts the half seems to come to a disease, an large antisepsis taking winter. (f4dbshop.com)
  • bacteria
  • Rat-bite Fever (RBF) is an rodent borne disease caused by two types of bacteria, Streptobacillus moniliformis, which is predominany in North America and Spirillum minus, predominantly in Asia. (wikipedia.org)
  • help
  • B. dendrobatidis also contains a variety of proteolytic enzymes and esterases that help it digest amphibian cells and use amphibian skin as a nutrient source. (wikipedia.org)
  • body
  • Schistosome cercarial dermatitis, caused by skin entry by larval flatworms, experienced after body contact with natural waters. (dmoztools.net)
  • In the horror film Rabid (1977) starring Marilyn Chambers, a critically injured woman receives plastic surgery that treats some of her intact tissue to become morphogenetically neutral, in hopes that tissue grafts to fire-damaged areas of her body will differentiate and replace the damaged skin and organs. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Glycogen storage disease type 13 (GSD13), also known as β-enolase deficiency, is an inherited disease of the muscles . (nih.gov)
  • several
  • Several articles, recent to early 2014, warn that human activities are spreading vector-borne zoonotic diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several articles were published in the medical journal The Lancet, and discuss how rapid changes in land use, trade globalization, and "social upheaval" are causing a resurgence in zoonotic disease across the world. (wikipedia.org)
  • cases
  • In many cases poverty is considered the leading risk factor or determinant for such diseases, and in some cases the diseases themselves are identified as barriers to economic development that would end poverty. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to an increased awareness of the disease and improved isolation methods, more and more cases are being recognized and reported worldwide. (wikipedia.org)
  • once
  • Once they reach the appropriate depth, the grub empties its stomach and starts to form a smooth oval shaped cell, the developing wings and legs can be seen through the then translucent skin (epidermal layer) as its making its transition to pupae, the size range is Size range of pupae is 10-30 mm in length. (wikipedia.org)
  • human
  • Although Aronson isolated this mycobacterium in 1926 from a fish, it was not until 1951 that it was found to be the cause of human disease by Linell and Norden. (wikipedia.org)
  • group
  • The group of animals with spiny skin and tube feet, which they can use to exert great pressure (suction) and pull their prey open, is. (studystack.com)