• mRNA
  • The positive-sense RNA acts as a viral mRNA, which is translated into proteins for the production of new virion materials. (wikipedia.org)
  • The positive RNA acts as mRNA, which is translated into structural capsomere proteins and viral RdRp by the host's ribosomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • A replicative complex is formed with RdRp: The positive strands can either function as mRNA to produce more proteins or as template to make more negative RNA strands. (wikipedia.org)
  • single-stranded
  • A negative-sense single-stranded RNA virus (or (-)ssRNA virus) is a virus that uses negative sense, single-stranded RNA as its genetic material. (wikipedia.org)
  • Single stranded RNA viruses are classified as positive or negative depending on the sense or polarity of the RNA. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition, negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses have complex genomic sequences, cell cycles, and replication habits that use various protein complexes to arrange in specific conformations and carry out necessary processes for survival and reproduction of their genomic sequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • The complexity of negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses carries into its ability to suppress the innate immune response of the cells it infects and the construction of a capsid, which is unique to the varying classifications of negative-sense single-stranded RNA viruses. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lassa virus (Arenaviridae) Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (Arenaviridae) Hantavirus (Bunyaviridae) Marburg Virus (Filoviridae) Ebola virus (Filoviridae) Influenza (Orthomyxoviridae) Measles (Paramyxoviridae) Mumps virus (Paramyxoviridae) Human respiratory syncytial virus (Paramyxoviridae) Parainfluenza (Paramyxoviridae) Rabies (Rhabdoviridae) Vesicular stomatitis virus (Rhabdoviridae) The genome for negative-stranded RNA virus (NSV) consists of one to several single-stranded RNAs, which are assembled into complexes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Expression
  • Expression quantitative trait loci in long non-coding RNA ZNRD1-AS1 influence both HBV infection and hepatocellular carcinoma development. (nih.gov)