• probability
  • A risk matrix allows you to assess the probability and severity of an unexpected event with a view to identifying the effort that needs to go into avoiding that event. (google.com)
  • Tail risks include events that have a small probability of occurring and occur at the ends of a normal distribution curve. (investopedia.com)
  • Risk perception is the subjective judgment people make about the severity and probability of a risk, and may vary person to person. (wikipedia.org)
  • This concept is more properly known as the 'Expectation Value' or 'Risk Factor' and is used to compare levels of risk) The probability or threat of quantifiable damage, injury, liability, loss, or any other negative occurrence that is caused by external or internal vulnerabilities, and that may be avoided through preemptive action. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reference needed) A risk is not an uncertainty (where neither the probability nor the mode of occurrence is known), a peril (cause of loss), or a hazard (something that makes the occurrence of a peril more likely or more severe). (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, the risk of developing cancer is estimated as the incremental probability of developing cancer over a lifetime as a result of exposure to potential carcinogens (cancer-causing substances). (wikipedia.org)
  • Risk can be seen as relating to the probability of uncertain future events. (wikipedia.org)
  • OHSAS (Occupational Health & Safety Advisory Services) defines risk as the combination of the probability of a hazard resulting in an adverse event, and the severity of the event. (wikipedia.org)
  • Producer's risk is the probability that a good product will be rejected as a bad product by the consumer. (wikipedia.org)
  • Or rejecting the lot of satisfactory quality is a risk faced by any producer, the probability of rejecting a lot under the sampling inspection plan is called Producer's risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, model risk is more and more prevalent in activities other than financial securities valuation, such as assigning consumer credit scores, real-time probability prediction of fraudulent credit card transactions, and computing the probability of air flight passenger being a terrorist. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rotten Tomatoes
  • The episode received a rating of 82% with an average score of 6.37 out of 10 on the review aggregator Rotten Tomatoes, with the site's consensus stating "The grimly entertaining 'Imminent Risk' powers past narrative weaknesses with a solid followup to its action-packed predecessor. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposure
  • What can a multinational company do to minimize exposure to political risk? (investopedia.com)
  • Commitment to address the world's increasing vulnerability and exposure to disaster risk arises from a clear acknowledgment that the impact of climate change is resulting in more frequent, intense and geographically distributed hazards and that the world's increasing urbanization is concentrating economic and physical risk in densely populated cities. (un.org)
  • For Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and Least Developed Countries (LDCs), the need to reduce disaster risk through adaptation to climate change and strengthening early warning systems forms a significant part of their national response, particularly given the often limited economic base (fisheries, tourism and single crops) and their high degree of overall exposure to disasters. (un.org)
  • The fund manager of a target risk fund is responsible for overseeing all the securities owned within the fund, to ensure that the level of risk isn't greater or less than the fund's target amount of risk exposure. (investopedia.com)
  • Target risk funds typically label themselves as "conservative", "moderate risk" or "aggressive" in terms of their risk exposure. (investopedia.com)
  • Regardless of the label applied, the intent is to offer a relatively constant level of risk exposure to investors. (investopedia.com)
  • This allows investors who are considered highly risk averse to identify and select a fund of funds that has a conservative risk exposure target, and once invested in the fund, remain confident that their level of risk exposure will not change substantially. (investopedia.com)
  • The manager of a target risk fund is responsible for ensuring that the fund's level of risk exposure is on target, and the fee's charged for operating the fund (on top of the fees charged by mutual funds owned within the target risk fund) is compensation for the value-added service. (investopedia.com)
  • derivatives
  • Cont and Deguest propose a method for computing model risk exposures in multi-asset equity derivatives and show that options which depend on the worst or best performances in a basket (so called rainbow option) are more exposed to model uncertainty than index options. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gennheimer investigates the model risk present in pricing basket default derivatives. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the context of derivative pricing Cont (2006) proposes a quantitative approach to measurement of model risk exposures in derivatives portfolios: first, a set of benchmark models is specified and calibrated to market prices of liquid instruments, then the target portfolio is priced under all benchmark models. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1996
  • Maximum Risk is a 1996 American action thriller film directed by Hong Kong director Ringo Lam in his American directorial debut, and starring Jean-Claude Van Damme and Natasha Henstridge. (wikipedia.org)
  • management
  • Trusted regulatory, customer and pricing data, intuitive software, and expert insight and services - benefit from this powerful combination of risk management solutions from the market leader, Thomson Reuters. (thomsonreuters.com)
  • Over a period of time with the help of the Safety Management System risk is reduced as new learning leads to new barriers and reduced risk. (google.com)
  • Underlying risk drivers, such as poor urban governance, lack of proper urban planning and land management, vulnerable rural livelihoods, declining ecosystems, and climate change underpin the expansion of disaster risk. (un.org)
  • In this context, much of the risk is associated with public investment decisions, which are shaped through a number of development planning processes that include land-use planning and management, sector investment planning, ecosystem management, as well as public and private investment. (un.org)
  • Factoring and applying disaster risk into public investment decisions directly addresses critical risk drivers and downplays potential disaster-related losses and costs at a scale impossible to achieve through stand-alone disaster risk management. (un.org)
  • 3. Commercial Bank Risk Management: An Analysis of the Process 1 This Version: February 28, 1997Abstract: Throughout the past year, on-site visits to financial service firms were conductedto review and evaluate their financial risk management systems. (slideshare.net)
  • The commercial bankinganalysis covered a number of North American super-regionals and quasi-money centerinstitutions as well as several firms outside the U.S. The information obtained covered boththe philosophy and practice of financial risk management. (slideshare.net)
  • It reports the state of risk management techniques in the industry. (slideshare.net)
  • In response tothis, commercial banks have almost universally embarked upon an upgrading of their risk management andcontrol systems. (slideshare.net)
  • Coincidental to this activity, and in part because of our recognition of the industrys vulnerability tofinancial risk, the Wharton Financial Institutions Center, with the support of the Sloan Foundation, has beeninvolved in an analysis of financial risk management processes in the financial sector. (slideshare.net)
  • Very different approaches to risk management are taken in different fields, e.g. (wikipedia.org)
  • Risk is ubiquitous in all areas of life and risk management is something that we all must do, whether we are managing a major organisation or simply crossing the road. (wikipedia.org)
  • Extremes and Integrated Risk Management. (wikipedia.org)
  • He writes "Understanding the robustness of models used for hedging and risk-management purposes with respect to the assumption of perfectly liquid markets is therefore an important issue in the analysis of model risk in general. (wikipedia.org)
  • Risk management is the configuration and identification of analyzing, and or acceptance during investment decision-making. (wikipedia.org)
  • Improper risk management can and or will negatively affect companies as well as their individuals. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, the recession that began in 2008 was largely caused by the loose credit risk management of financial firms. (wikipedia.org)
  • tumours
  • The largest study to date on the risks of mobile phone use, the 2010 Interphone study, found no raised risk of brain tumours among those who regularly used mobiles. (nzherald.co.nz)
  • Disaster Risk
  • Disaster risk is increasing globally. (un.org)
  • Through the application of disaster risk reduction, quality and sustainability of public spending is enhanced and further contributes to social and economic development and building resilience. (un.org)
  • As stated in the Hyogo Framework for Action 2005-2015: Building resilience of nations, cities, and communities to disasters, disaster risk reduction is intrinsically part of sustainable development as it is about addressing the underlying risks to development, reducing vulnerability and thereby increasing resilience of nations, cities, and communities. (un.org)
  • To achieve this, public education on sustainable development broadly, and disaster risk reduction specifically, needs to be supported as a key instrument of accountability. (un.org)
  • Experiences from countries have shown that disaster risk reduction is most cost-effective when it is integrated from the beginning of the process, including in adaptation. (un.org)
  • The preparatory process of Rio+20 has identified 'disaster risk reduction and resilience' as one of the emerging issues in the context of sustainable development. (un.org)
  • This coincides with the growing desire of Member States to increase dialogue on innovative solutions to address the challenge of disaster risk. (un.org)
  • Against this background, it is very timely to hold an informal thematic debate on addressing disaster risk through public investment decisions. (un.org)
  • 2001
  • To assess associations between cannabis use and change in risk for incident nonmedical prescription opioid use and opioid use disorder at 3 years, researchers analyzed data from wave 1 (2001-2002) and wave 2 (2004-2005) of the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions. (healio.com)
  • arises
  • Tail risk is a form of portfolio risk that arises when the possibility that an investment will move more than three standard deviations from the mean is greater than what is shown by a normal distribution . (investopedia.com)
  • B) RISK ATTRIBUTABLE TO FAULT OF EITHER PARTY: Any damage or loss which arises as a result of the fault or neglect of the seller or the buyer or their respective agents as the case may be shall be borne by that party at fault. (wikipedia.org)
  • hedge
  • Firms that had been performingwell suddenly announced large losses due to credit exposures that turned sour, interest rate positions taken,or derivative exposures that may or may not have been assumed to hedge balance sheet risk. (slideshare.net)
  • DEFINITION
  • Many definitions of risk exist in common usage, however this definition was developed by an international committee representing over 30 countries and is based on the input of several thousand subject matter experts. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancers
  • A hysterectomy is usually curative because most cancers have a low risk of spreading (metastasising) to other sites which may result in a later recurrence. (cochrane.org)
  • Institutional
  • In the context of development there are significant opportunities for all Member States to address risk through a new institutional framework for sustainable development. (un.org)
  • securities
  • In finance, model risk is the risk of loss resulting from using insufficiently accurate models to make decisions, originally and frequently in the context of valuing financial securities. (wikipedia.org)
  • harm
  • Carrie makes her case to investigator Christine Lonas (Marin Hinkle), who has determined that Frannie is in imminent risk of further harm after the recent incident with Quinn. (wikipedia.org)
  • refers
  • A type of political risk that refers to political actions in a host country that can adversely affect selected foreign operations. (investopedia.com)
  • impacts
  • References to negative risk below should be read as also applying to positive impacts or opportunity (e.g. for "loss" read "loss or gain") unless the context precludes this interpretation. (wikipedia.org)
  • Researchers
  • Researchers found that people who used mobiles for 15 hours per month on average had a two to three times greater risk of developing glioma and meningioma - the main types of brain tumour - compared with those who used their phone rarely. (nzherald.co.nz)
  • Investments
  • Pension funds are also subject to reinvestment risk especially with the short-term nature of cash investments there is always the risk that future proceeds will have to be reinvested at a lower interest rate. (wikipedia.org)
  • suggests
  • Using a mobile phone for more than half an hour a day over five years can triple the risk of developing certain types of brain cancer, a French study suggests. (nzherald.co.nz)
  • The subset analysis that excluded old fashioned drug regimens suggests that chemotherapy reduces the risk of being dead at any nominated time by a quarter. (cochrane.org)
  • However, the concept of tail risk suggests that the distribution of returns is not normal, but skewed, and has fatter tails. (investopedia.com)
  • judgment
  • Burke regards failure to use a model (instead over-relying on expert judgment) as a type of model risk. (wikipedia.org)
  • typically
  • In epidemiology it is typically defined to be the difference between the proportion of subjects in a population with a particular disease who were exposed to a specified risk factor and the proportion of subjects with that same disease who were not exposed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Wealth
  • Values (such as physical health, social status, emotional well-being, or financial wealth) can be gained or lost when taking risk resulting from a given action or inaction, foreseen or unforeseen (planned or not planned). (wikipedia.org)
  • producer
  • Marcio Alvarado, better known by his stage name Alvin Risk, is an American electronic music producer, singer and DJ from Washington, D.C. He has released music on OWSLA, Dim Mak, and Ministry of Sound. (wikipedia.org)
  • He has also released under the label Memory LTD. Risk is the brother of Painted Face, singer and producer Allie Alvarado. (wikipedia.org)
  • cancer risk
  • Your article (Aug. 8), "FDA Approves 2 Dyes, Calls Cancer Risk 'Trivial,' " prompts this letter. (latimes.com)
  • The use of the word "trivial" in reference to cancer risk shows a lack of concern for human life or suffering. (latimes.com)
  • high
  • Any risk is too high because the use of these chemicals is cosmetic and serves no important purpose. (latimes.com)
  • Detection Risk and quality of audit have an inverse relationship: if detection risk is high, lower the quality of audit and if detection risk is low, generally increase the quality of audit. (wikipedia.org)
  • For a risk to be insurable, several things need to be true: The insurer must be able to charge a premium high enough to cover not only claims expenses, but also to cover the insurer's expenses. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, risks that are too large cannot be insured, or the premiums would be so high as to make purchasing the insurance infeasible. (wikipedia.org)
  • factor
  • For example, according to Factor Analysis of Information Risk, risk is: the probable frequency and probable magnitude of future loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • face
  • Most large corporations and banks face this risk to some degree, as they may constantly borrow and repay loans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Rantala (2006) mentions that "In the face of model risk, rather than to base decisions on a single selected 'best' model, the modeller can base his inference on an entire set of models by using model averaging. (wikipedia.org)
  • investment
  • The risk resulting from the fact that interest or dividends earned from an investment may not be able to be reinvested in such a way that they earn the same rate of return as the invested funds that generated them. (wikipedia.org)
  • potential
  • Aim 3 was to utilize our interactive, customized portal as a risk communication tool by allowing residents to educate themselves as to the potential risks from industrial sources in close proximity to their community. (mdpi.com)
  • Risk is the potential of gaining or losing something of value. (wikipedia.org)
  • statistical
  • The international compliance regime for banks, Basel II, requires that such risks be quantified using a mixture of statistical theory, such as extreme value theory, and scenario analysis conducted by internal committees of experts. (wikipedia.org)
  • Massive
  • These risks, called operational risks, include the major events most likely to cause bank failure, such as massive internal fraud. (wikipedia.org)
  • place
  • The green shapes are the residual risk after mitigating barriers are put in place. (google.com)
  • level of risk
  • It is difficult to define a level of risk, if any, especially as mobile phone technology is constantly evolving," the study conceded. (nzherald.co.nz)
  • general
  • In general, refinancing risk is only considered to be substantial for banks in cases of financial crisis, when borrowing funds, such as inter-bank deposits, may be extremely difficult. (wikipedia.org)
  • The general rule is that unless otherwise agreed, risk passes with title. (wikipedia.org)
  • EXCEPTIONS TO THE GENERAL RULE: (A) RISK INCIDENTAL TO TRANSIT: The law provided that where the seller undertakes to make delivery of the goods to the buyer, risk attendant to the system of transportation or voyage contemplated will be borne by the buyer unless the parties agreed to the contrary. (wikipedia.org)