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  • vein
  • A) Color fundus photograph of the right eye showing cotton-wool spots (yellow arrow heads), retinal whitening, retinal vein sheathing (white arrow heads), and aneurysmal dilations at the optic disc. (healio.com)
  • E) Color fundus photograph of the left eye showing an ERM at the macula, hard exudates in the peripapillary region (red arrow head), retinal vein sheathing (white arrow heads), and aneurysmal dilations at the optic disc. (healio.com)
  • patients
  • Macular exudation and retinal neovascularization secondary to diffuse capillary nonperfusion can lead to progressive visual loss in some patients. (healio.com)
  • occurs
  • Loss of visual acuity with this particular form of eye occlusion will depend mostly on whether arterial blood flow has been disrupted and if swelling is present in the macula, where the focusing occurs. (belmarrahealth.com)
  • The currently-available treatments are aimed at opening the occluded artery before irreversible damage occurs and most often do not improve visual acuity above natural history. (cnbc.com)
  • Unilateral
  • Unilateral visual loss in bright light may indicate ipsilateral carotid artery occlusive disease and may reflect the inability of borderline circulation to sustain the increased retinal metabolic activity associated with exposure to bright light. (wikipedia.org)
  • neovascularization
  • Macular exudation and retinal neovascularization secondary to diffuse capillary nonperfusion can lead to progressive visual loss in some patients. (healio.com)
  • macula
  • Fluorescein angiography showed delayed artery filling and late leakage in the macula of the right eye. (omicsonline.org)
  • Therefore, its possible for the cilio retinal artery itself to occlude causing significant visual loss in the perfused macula region (surrounding visual field will remain intact). (wikipedia.org)
  • A cherry-red spot may be seen in the macula, along with cotton-wool spots elsewhere, due to retinal nerve fiber layer hemorrhages. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • The cause is unknown but the current thinking is that antibodies are produced against endothelial cells in tiny arteries which leads to damage and the symptoms related to the illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • photocoagulation
  • At a later stage, pan-retinal photocoagulation (PRP) with an argon laser appears effective in reducing the neovascular components and their sequelae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Treatment consists of Anti-VEGF drugs like Lucentis or intravitreal steroid implant (Ozurdex) and Pan-Retinal Laser Photocoagulation usually. (wikipedia.org)
  • bilateral
  • Krarup described a patient with multiple cardiac defects and Eisenmenger syndrome who developed bilateral rubeosis iridis with spontaneous hyphemas and minimal retinal findings [ 3 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • painless
  • Abrupt painless loss of vision in the visual field corresponding to territory of the obstructed artery is the typical history of presentation. (wikipedia.org)
  • disorders
  • Irreversible loss of these cells has been attributed as a cause of blindness in many retinal degenerative disorders, including RP. (wikipedia.org)
  • detachment
  • Those caused by a carotid artery embolism or occlusion have the potential for further stroke by detachment of embolus and migration to an end-artery of the brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • These may present in many different ways such as impaired vision, night blindness, retinal detachment, light sensitivity, tunnel vision, and loss of peripheral vision to total loss of vision. (wikipedia.org)
  • vessel
  • Though the exact pathogenesis of this disorder is unknown, the retinal and brain biopsy findings suggest a small vessel vasculopathy leading to arteriolar occlusion and microinfarction of cerebral, retinal and cochlear tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • vein
  • A) Color fundus photograph of the right eye showing cotton-wool spots (yellow arrow heads), retinal whitening, retinal vein sheathing (white arrow heads), and aneurysmal dilations at the optic disc. (healio.com)
  • E) Color fundus photograph of the left eye showing an ERM at the macula, hard exudates in the peripapillary region (red arrow head), retinal vein sheathing (white arrow heads), and aneurysmal dilations at the optic disc. (healio.com)
  • patients
  • Macular exudation and retinal neovascularization secondary to diffuse capillary nonperfusion can lead to progressive visual loss in some patients. (healio.com)
  • macula
  • All patients will be underwent eye examination (medical history, best corrected visual acuity, slit-lamp and stereo optic disc evaluation, Goldmann applanation tonometry, central corneal thickness measurement , Humphrey central 24-2 threshold perimetry test and optical coherence tomography of the optic nerve head, retinal nerve fibre layer and macula. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • The clinical macula is seen when viewed from the pupil, as in ophthalmoscopy or retinal photography. (wikipedia.org)
  • Therefore, its possible for the cilio retinal artery itself to occlude causing significant visual loss in the perfused macula region (surrounding visual field will remain intact). (wikipedia.org)
  • Macular telangiectasia describes two distinct retinal diseases affecting the macula of the eye, macular telangiectasia type 1 and macular telangiectasia type 2. (wikipedia.org)
  • vascular
  • Hypertensive retinopathy is a condition characterized by a spectrum of retinal vascular signs in people with elevated blood pressure. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to the previously noted vascular occlusions, development of different thromboembolic manifestations simultaneously or within one or two weeks must occur and the patient must have an underlying inherited or acquired hypercoagulable state (other than Antiphospholipid syndrome) Treatment for Thrombotic Storm may include lifelong anticoagulation therapy and/or thrombolytic therapy, plasmapherisis, and corticosteroids. (wikipedia.org)
  • cardiac
  • These masses produce shunting of blood from the aorta via the main hepatic artery and, in extreme cases, present with resulting cardiac failure. (blogspot.com)
  • For example, blockage of a coronary artery may cause cardiac muscle death due to the temporary lack of blood supply to the cardiac tissue. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • Hypertensive heart disease is the result of structural and functional adaptations leading to left ventricular hypertrophy, diastolic dysfunction, CHF, abnormalities of blood flow due to atherosclerotic coronary artery disease and microvascular disease, and cardiac arrhythmias. (wikipedia.org)
  • coronary
  • It is an independent predisposing factor for heart failure, coronary artery disease, stroke, renal disease, and peripheral arterial disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Myocardial infarction, in the absence of severe coronary artery disease Stroke and/or transient ischemic attack, in the absence of severe atherosclerotic disease and at an age less than 60 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • arteriolar
  • Though the exact pathogenesis of this disorder is unknown, the retinal and brain biopsy findings suggest a small vessel vasculopathy leading to arteriolar occlusion and microinfarction of cerebral, retinal and cochlear tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the initial, vasoconstrictive stage, there is vasospasm and an increase in retinal arteriolar tone owing to local autoregulatory mechanisms. (wikipedia.org)
  • arterioles
  • The presence of refractile or non-refractile yellow Gass plaques in the retinal arterioles is near pathognomonic for the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • This stage is seen clinically as a generalized narrowing of the retinal arterioles. (wikipedia.org)
  • endothelial cells
  • The cause is unknown but the current thinking is that antibodies are produced against endothelial cells in tiny arteries which leads to damage and the symptoms related to the illness. (wikipedia.org)
  • emboli
  • Three main types of retinal emboli have been identified: Cholesterol, calcific, and fibrin-platelet. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Alternatively, arterial occlusion occurs as a consequence of embolism of blood clots originating from the heart ("cardiogenic" emboli). (wikipedia.org)
  • choroid
  • Consequently, sudden occlusion of any PCA will produce an infarct in the region of the choroid supplied by that particular PCA. (wikipedia.org)
  • anterior
  • The OA continues anteriorly, giving off the anterior ethmoidal artery which enters the nose after traversing the anterior ethmoidal canal and supplies the anterior and middle ethmoidal sinuses as well as the frontal sinus and also enters the cranium to supply the meninges. (wikipedia.org)
  • infarct
  • Occlusion of a short or long PCA will produce a smaller choroidal infarct within the larger area supplied by the specific parent PCA. (wikipedia.org)
  • demonstrate
  • O. Venkatesh P, they demonstrate that mature retinal what can change their architectures and receptor expressions, while glia can change their architectures and metabolic profiles. (luxbar-starway.ru)
  • Fluorescein angiography may demonstrate leakage in areas remote from the retinal infarctions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Careful evaluation of possible thrombosis in other organ systems is pertinent in expediting treatment to prevent fatality.Preliminary diagnosis consists of evidence documented with proper imaging studies such as CT scan, MRI, or echocardiography, which demonstrate a thromboembolic occlusion in the veins and/or arteries. (wikipedia.org)
  • inferior
  • The OA continues anteriorly to the trochlea where the medial palpebral arteries (superior and inferior) arise and supply the eyelids. (wikipedia.org)
  • vision
  • Abrupt painless loss of vision in the visual field corresponding to territory of the obstructed artery is the typical history of presentation. (wikipedia.org)