• involve
  • In some BDSM relationships, such as D/s, aftercare may involve the Dominant caring for the submissive if physical pain was inflicted, such as applying baby oil to areas that were struck during play. (wikipedia.org)
  • Discrimination
  • The plaintiff asserted that developmentally disabled, cognitively impaired, and sensory impaired CYA wards were denied basic care, physical accommodations, and necessary staffing and were subject to discrimination and harassment, as were mentally ill wards. (clearinghouse.net)
  • state
  • Davis still keeps a crate of documents about what the state used to call "therapeutic restraint. (theforecaster.net)
  • We wished to review the literature published in scientific peer-reviewed journals describing studies on the use of physical restraint in Norway, in order to identify the current state of knowledge and directions for future research. (uit.no)
  • reasons
  • The average importance rating from 1 ( least ) to 5 ( most ) of the 17 reasons for requiring physical restraints was significantly higher among family caregivers than home care providers, and significantly different among the home care providers. (beds.ac.uk)
  • care
  • Furthermore, it is also not clear how home care providers who support family caregivers perceive the use of physical restraint in elders' homes. (beds.ac.uk)
  • A number of private national and regional companies teach physical (non-mechanical) restraint techniques for companies and agencies that care for or have custody of people who might become aggressive. (wikipedia.org)
  • free
  • Instead, the new version of Chapter 33 states "no physical restraint may be used that restricts the free movement of the diaphragm or chest or that restricts the airway so as to interrupt normal breathing or speech. (theforecaster.net)
  • Throughout the last decade or so, there has been an increasing amount of evidence and literature supporting the idea of a restraint free environment due to their contradictory and dangerous effects. (wikipedia.org)
  • often
  • Field Punishment Number One, often abbreviated to "F.P. No. 1" or even just "No. 1", consisted of the convicted man being placed in fetters and handcuffs or similar restraints and attached to a fixed object, such as a gun wheel or a fence post, for up to two hours per day. (wikipedia.org)
  • cases
  • Pouches carrying restraints are usually carried on the duty belt, and in some cases carried in police vans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prone restraints can injure students, and in some national cases, students have died after being restrained. (theforecaster.net)
  • Historically, people have used many pejorative terms to describe/label cases of significant physical malformations. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk
  • Guidelines set out by the Association of Chief Police Officers dictate that restraints are only to be used on subjects who are violent while being transported, restraining the use of their arms and legs, minimising the risk of punching and kicking. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Some believed it was the punishment of the gods while others believed it to be caused a physical problem, this led to many variations of treatment ranging from prayer to surgery. (wikipedia.org)
  • cause
  • Various ground textures in urban as well as natural areas can cause substantial physical distress for a shoeless person and hinder the locomotion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Although the 1914 Manual of Military Law specifically stated that Field Punishment should not be applied in such a way as to cause physical harm, in practice abuses were commonplace. (wikipedia.org)