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  • regenerate
  • In reptiles, chelonians, crocodilians and snakes are unable to regenerate lost parts, but many (not all) kinds of lizards, geckos and iguanas possess regeneration capacity in a high degree. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regeneration among arthropods is restricted by molting such that hemimetabolous insects are capable of regeneration only until their final molt whereas most crustaceans can regenerate throughout their lifetimes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Presumptive regeneration (also presupposed regeneration) is the idea often associated with Abraham Kuyper that parents should baptize their children based on a presumption of the child's being regenerate. (wikipedia.org)
  • The aim of their work was to clear small niches adjacent to healthy native vegetation such that the each area will regenerate from in-situ soil seed banks or be re-colonised and stabilized by the regeneration of native plants, replacing an area previously occupied by weeds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Current leading edge research focuses on developing adsorbents able to regenerate 100% of their adsorptive capacity through electrochemical regeneration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Liver regeneration is also critical for patients of liver diseases where the partial removal of the liver due to fibrosis or tumor is a common therapy that utilizes the ability of the remaining liver to regenerate back. (wikipedia.org)
  • involves
  • The electrochemical regeneration of activated carbon based adsorbents involves the removal of molecules adsorbed onto the surface of the adsorbent with the use of an electric current in an electrochemical cell restoring the carbon's adsorptive capacity. (wikipedia.org)
  • Liver regeneration involves replication of the liver cells, mainly hepatocytes, followed by other cells such as biliary epithelial cells and sinusoidal endothelial cells. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • Once the adsorptive capacity of the activated carbon bed has been exhausted by the adsorption of pollutant molecules, the carbon is transferred to an electrochemical cell (to either the anode or the cathode) in which electrochemical regeneration can occur. (wikipedia.org)
  • renewal
  • Section 1215 of the Catechism of the Catholic Church states: "This sacrament [baptism] is also called 'the washing of regeneration and renewal by the Holy Spirit,' for it signifies and actually brings about the birth of water and the Spirit without which no one 'can enter the kingdom of God. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bush
  • Bush regeneration attempts to protect and enhance the floral biodiversity in an area by providing conditions conducive to the recruitment and survival of native plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Their work was the beginning of minimal disturbance bush regeneration in New South Wales. (wikipedia.org)
  • The adoption of minimal disturbance bush regeneration increased in the decades that followed the work of the Bradleys. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most peri urban councils now have some involvement in bush regeneration, either through planning, land management, volunteer support or through employment of bush regeneration practitioners. (wikipedia.org)
  • In NSW the level of coordination of bush regeneration programs through local governments is high, although in some other areas at present a lack of coordination is a serious concern in bush regeneration on public land, with only 40% of councils liaising with other councils. (wikipedia.org)
  • Invasive plant species are often the greatest threat to remnant vegetation, and therefore bush regeneration is closely associated with weed abatement activities. (wikipedia.org)
  • process
  • This should not be confused with the transdifferentiation of cells which is when they lose their tissue-specific characteristics during the regeneration process, and then re-differentiate to a different kind of cell. (wikipedia.org)
  • This process is used in clay polishing plants for waste oil re-refining and transformer oil regeneration systems for the reclamation of old transformer oil to as-new condition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Experimental regeneration process of used motor oils. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once cell proliferation is completed, the newly divided cells undergo restructuring, angiogenesis and reformation of extracellular matrix to complete the regeneration process. (wikipedia.org)
  • Liver regeneration is highly controlled process regulated by complex network on highly redundant signals. (wikipedia.org)
  • adult
  • In May 1932, L.H. McKim published a report in The Canadian Medical Association Journal, that described the regeneration of an adult digit-tip following amputation. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is one of the earliest recorded examples of adult human digit-tip regeneration. (wikipedia.org)
  • carbon
  • Thermal regeneration is the most prolific regeneration technique but has drawbacks in terms of high energy and commercial costs and a significant carbon footprint. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regeneration efficiencies of activated carbon in the anodic compartment are lower than that achievable in the cathodic compartment by between 5-20% for the same regeneration times and currents, however there is no observed residual organic due to the strong oxidising nature of the anode. (wikipedia.org)
  • Currently there are a very limited number of commercially available carbon based adsorption- electrochemical regeneration systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • One system that does exist uses a carbon adsorbent called Nyex in a continuous adsorption-regeneration system that uses electrochemical regeneration to adsorb and destroy organic pollutants. (wikipedia.org)
  • scientists
  • As is the case in most scientific pursuits, these accomplishments might be applied to other forms of regeneration and vice versa as scientists continue to study tissue engineering. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed
  • While for Reformed theologian Louis Berkhof, "regeneration" and "new birth" are synonymous, Herbert Lockyer treats the two terms as different in meaning in one publication,[citation needed] but in another states that baptism signifies regeneration. (wikipedia.org)
  • however
  • However, so far, this regeneration by NSCs is insufficient to restore the full function and structure of an injured brain. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, due to mass transfer limitations between the cathode and anode, there is often residual pollutant left in the cathode unless large currents or long regeneration times are employed. (wikipedia.org)
  • study
  • This ability combined with the considerable similarity between teleost and mammalian retinal structure makes zebrafish an attractive model for the study of retinal regeneration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Two main type of models are used to study liver regeneration including surgical removal also referred to as partial hepatectomy (PHX) and chemical-induced liver damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • development
  • Cells in the primordia of zebrafish fins, for example, express four genes from the homeobox msx family during development and regeneration. (wikipedia.org)
  • Heritage has often been seen as a barrier to development, and often a barrier to regeneration. (rtpi.org.uk)
  • Synthesis/Regeneration is an independently published quarterly magazine whose articles examine contemporary issues in environmental politics, energy development, energy policy, climate change, social change, and social justice. (wikipedia.org)
  • cell
  • The following therapies do not rely on autologous cells: A vibration technique developed by Ellen L. Barnard and Myrtile Wilhite claims to promote regeneration in the vaginal cell lining. (wikipedia.org)
  • issues
  • Beyond the labels of "Generation X" and "Generation Y," the feature documentary film ReGeneration takes an uncompromising look at the issues facing today's youth and young adults, and the influences that perpetuate our culture's apathetic approach to social and political causes. (collider.com)