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  • injuries
  • Care was given to elderly, adults and infants for Orthopedic diseases benign and malignant and for injuries ranging from sports accidents to war casualties including rehabilitation of amputees. (wikipedia.org)
  • recurrent
  • A combination of certain factors may predispose to some form of FAI, predominantly, a marginal developmental hip abnormality together with environmental factors such as activities involving recurrent motion of the legs within a supraphysiologic range. (wikipedia.org)
  • Recurrent lifting and overhead motions are at risk for rotator cuff tears. (wikipedia.org)
  • transverse
  • CONCLUSION: Our motion analysis study found the Aspen collar to be superior to the other collars when measuring restriction of movement of the cervical spine in all planes, particularly the sagittal and transverse planes, while the Aspen Vista was the least effective collar. (biomedsearch.com)
  • Joint
  • The developed model allows extracting, from the COR positions, a complete characterization of the limb motion in terms of kinematic variables (angles, velocities and accelerations of arm joints), dynamic variables (joint torques) and energetic variables (potential and kinetic energy and powers related to each joint). (nih.gov)
  • Most rehabilitation programs combine efforts to protect the joint with muscle strengthening and range of motion. (wikipedia.org)
  • Femoroacetabular Impingement (FAI), or hip impingement syndrome, may affect the hip joint in young and middle-aged adults and occurs when the ball shaped femoral head rubs abnormally or does not permit a normal range of motion in the acetabular socket. (wikipedia.org)
  • Joint effusion and limited range of motion are common associated features. (wikipedia.org)
  • Note that the degrees of freedom of a joint is not the same as the same as joint's range of motion. (wikipedia.org)
  • The three-joint complex that results is sometimes referred to as the "articular triad. (wikipedia.org)
  • This is the region known as the 'neutral zone', which is the motion region of the joint where the passive osteoligamentous stability mechanisms exert little or no influence. (wikipedia.org)
  • continuous passiv
  • Once the immobilization period has ended, physical therapy involves continuous passive motion (CPM) and/or low impact activities, such as walking or swimming. (wikipedia.org)
  • surgery
  • These erosions were between 5 and 10 mm in depth and became apparent at an average of 15 months (range, 6 to 24 months) following surgery. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The patient's mean age at surgery was 42 +/- 8 years (range 32-58 years), and the mean follow-up was 10 +/- 6 years (range 2-18 years). (biomedsearch.com)
  • All stems appeared radiographically stable and one stem was graded nonintegrated but stable.Five patients had revision surgery: one on the femoral side (for posttraumatic fracture) and four on the acetabular side.Considering stem revision for aseptic loosening as the end point, survivorship was 100% (range, 95.4%-99.9%) at 10 years. (nih.gov)
  • limits
  • Unlike some other rheumatological conditions such as rheumatoid arthritis, laboratory findings are usually within normal ranges or limits. (wikipedia.org)
  • consists
  • Within the total range of passive motion of any FSU, the typical load-displacement curve consists of 2 regions or 'zones' that exhibit very different biomechanical behavior. (wikipedia.org)
  • stability
  • It is a region in which a small load causes a relatively large displacement.The 'elastic zone' is the remaining region of FSU motion that continues from the end of the neutral zone to the point of maximum resistance (provided by the passive osteoligamentous stability mechanism), thus limiting the range of motion. (wikipedia.org)
  • provide
  • The longer forelimbs and dorsally situated scapulae provide a broad range of motion which would enable suspensory below-branch behavior and proficiency in reaching food during foraging. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • Considering stem revision for aseptic loosening as the end point, survivorship was 100% (range, 95.4%-99.9%) at 10 years. (nih.gov)
  • movement
  • These primarily aim to alter the angle of the hip socket in such a way that contact between the acetabulum and femoral head are greatly reduced, allowing a greater range of movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • knee
  • Preoperative, and postoperative outcome measures at 3- and 12-months (Oxford knee score, pain score, SF12, and knee motion), were analysed and compared between patients who were satisfied and dissatisfied at 12-months following TKA. (ox.ac.uk)
  • bone
  • With the freeing of the articular bone and the quadrate from their function in jaw articulation, they became ear ossicles in conjunction with the columella, that is, a skeletal rod that formed the first ear ossicle. (encognitive.com)
  • joint
  • Pain is most severe at night and on joint use, with reduced range of motion, and sometimes with joint instability. (psychiatryadvisor.com)
  • Developed by world-renowned musculoskeletal expert Dr. Andreo Spina , Functional Range Conditioning┬« is a comprehensive joint training system based in scientific principals and research. (functionalanatomyseminars.com)
  • It stabilizes the distal radioulnar joint while improving the range of motion and gliding action within the wrist. (eorthopod.com)
  • The patient had clinical and radiological signs of syringomyelia, associated with a limited range of motion, swelling, and pain in the affected joint. (hindawi.com)
  • Neuropathic arthropathy, although less common, should be considered in cases of unexplained joint swelling, pain, and limited range of motion of the affected joint. (hindawi.com)
  • Proper functioning of the TM joint occurs with the condyle translating along the slope of the articular eminence. (balegoonline.org)
  • These studies were therefore never designed to form models of therapeutic manipulation, and the models formed were erroneous in that they described the target joint as being configured at the end range of a rotation movement, during the orientation phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, after re-examining the original studies on which the kinematic models of joint manipulation were based, Evans and Breen argued that the optimal prethrust position is actually the equivalent of the neutral zone of the individual joint, which is the motion region of the joint where the passive osteoligamentous stability mechanisms exert little or no influence. (wikipedia.org)
  • superior articul
  • The posterior part of the arch presents above and behind a rounded edge for the attachment of the posterior atlantooccipital membrane, while immediately behind each superior articular process is the superior vertebral notch (sulcus arteriae vertebralis). (wikipedia.org)
  • This is a groove that is sometimes converted into a foramen by ossification of the posterior atlantooccipital membrane to create a delicate bony spiculum which arches backward from the posterior end of the superior articular process. (wikipedia.org)
  • The mammillary is connected in the lumbar region with the back part of the superior articular process. (wikipedia.org)
  • damage
  • Damage to the ulnar collateral ligament is common among baseball pitchers and javelin throwers because the throwing motion is similar. (wikipedia.org)
  • wrist
  • This is a truly comprehensive plating system which offers you the locking and non-locking options necessary to treat a full range of hand and wrist fractures which present daily. (docplayer.net)