• neurotrophic factors
  • hello, several neurotrophic factors, but also tgf-betas are synthesized as precursors, consisting of a leader sequence (spliced off during export) and the mature protein. (bio.net)
  • Neurotrophic factors (NTFs) are a family of biomolecules - nearly all of which are peptides or small proteins - that support the growth, survival, and differentiation of both developing and mature neurons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neurotrophic factors also promote the initial growth and development of neurons in the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system, and they are capable of regrowing damaged neurons in test tubes and animal models. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some neurotrophic factors are also released by the target tissue in order to guide the growth of developing axons. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most neurotrophic factors belong to one of three families: (1) neurotrophins, (2) glial cell-line derived neurotrophic factor family ligands (GFLs), and (3) neuropoietic cytokines. (wikipedia.org)
  • Currently, neurotrophic factors are being intensely studied for use in bioartificial nerve conduits because they are necessary in vivo for directing axon growth and regeneration. (wikipedia.org)
  • In studies, neurotrophic factors are normally used in conjunction with other techniques such as biological and physical cues created by the addition of cells and specific topographies. (wikipedia.org)
  • The neurotrophic factors may or may not be immobilized to the scaffold structure, though immobilization is preferred because it allows for the creation of permanent, controllable gradients. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical citation needed] Although more information is being discovered about neurotrophic factors, their classification is based on different cellular mechanisms and they are grouped into three main families: the neurotrophins, the CNTF family, and GDNF family. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whereas neurotrophic factors within the neurotrophin family commonly have a protein tyrosine kinase receptor (Trk), Neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) has the unique receptor, TrkC. (wikipedia.org)
  • affects
  • A risk factor is anything that affects your chance of getting a disease such as cancer. (cancer.org)
  • Hence, a feeling of desire from seeing what is conceived as a beautiful object affects the other mental factors that are present at that time, and this colors the whole mind. (wikipedia.org)
  • mortality
  • Along with The global burden of disease: 2004 update , WHO also analyzed the mortality and burden of disease attributable to 24 global risk factors using a consistent analytic framework known as Comparative Risk Assessment (CRA). (who.int)
  • Regional estimates of mortality and burden of disease and injury attributable to these 24 global risk factors are available for download. (who.int)
  • Estimates are available for risk factor exposures, mortality, and Disability-Adjusted Life Years (DALYs) by age, sex, risk factor and cause. (who.int)
  • The major regulating factor for the human population in current times is inadequacy of safe drinking water, since waterborne disease is the principal environmental cause of mortality. (wikipedia.org)
  • differ
  • Future results could differ materially from those expressed due to the impact of changes in various factors. (graco.com)
  • Driving factors differ from static factors, such as building floor areas, which determine energy consumption but change only rarely (if at all). (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] All essential factors differ in controlability. (wikipedia.org)
  • cellular
  • Castle (gastric) factors, named after the American physician and physiologist W. B. Castle, are biologically active chemical compounds which stimulate haematopoiesis (formation of blood cellular components). (wikipedia.org)
  • Hypoxia-inducible factors (HIFs) are transcription factors that respond to decreases in available oxygen in the cellular environment, or hypoxia. (wikipedia.org)
  • Whereas
  • Traleg Rinpoche states that the main distinction between the mind and mental factors is that the mind apprehends an object as a whole, whereas mental factors apprehend an object in its particulars. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • Severe factor XII deficiency is a very rare condition and is not well known, even among health professionals. (hemophilia.ca)
  • Factor XII is also known as Hageman factor, named after the patient in whom this condition was first diagnosed. (hemophilia.ca)
  • And some people who get the disease may not have any known risk factors. (cancer.org)
  • In America Lilly Research Institute is widely known for work cytokine/growth factor research on bovine/human cartilage tissues. (bio.net)
  • Klf4, also known as gut-enriched Krüppel-like factor (GKLF), acts as a transcriptional activator or repressor depending on the promoter context and/or cooperation with other transcription factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • varies
  • If, however, one is ready to accept discounting that varies randomly with the possible outcomes, and therefore accepts the concept of a stochastic discount factor, then an economically consistent theory can be developed. (repec.org)
  • The number of sigma factors varies between bacterial species. (wikipedia.org)
  • The number and definition of factors varies, depending on theoretical purpose, empirical emphasis, or school of economics. (wikipedia.org)
  • sequence
  • An essential factor is one which when removed from, or added to, an incident sequence will interrupt that sequence. (wikipedia.org)
  • A contributing factor is one which increases the likelihood that the sequence of factors will continue but is not essential to the damage. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • Within Buddhism, there are many different systems of abhidharma (commonly referred to as Buddhist psychology), and each system contains its own list of the most significant mental factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • interaction
  • An incident is viewed in terms of an interaction of essential and contributing factors that results in damage to people, property or production. (wikipedia.org)
  • framework
  • chaitasika dharma), means phenomena arising from the mind, suggesting that the mental factors are not primary to the mind but arise within a larger framework. (wikipedia.org)
  • different
  • Different cancers have different risk factors. (cancer.org)
  • For the same agent, a different discounting factor has to be used for every separate valuation occasion. (repec.org)
  • Different sigma factors are utilized under different environmental conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Common factors theory, a theory guiding some research in clinical psychology and counseling psychology, proposes that different approaches and evidence-based practices in psychotherapy and counseling share common factors that account for much of the effectiveness of a psychological treatment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Goldfried and Padawer's emphasis on principles or strategies of change was an important contribution to common factors theory because they clearly showed how principles or strategies can be considered common factors (they are shared by therapists who may espouse different theories of change) and specific factors (they are manifested in particular ways within different approaches) at the same time. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • There was not enough data available to include dietary factors or alcohol consumption in the findings, but experts believe both could be similarly influential. (netdoctor.co.uk)
  • These risk factors include, but are not limited to, economic conditions in the United States and other major world economies, current fluctuations, political instability, changes in laws and regulations, and changes in product demand. (graco.com)
  • Some of the main commentaries on the Abhidharma systems that are studied today include: Abhidhammattha-sangaha by Acariya Anuruddha - a Theravada commentary that lists fifty-two mental factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • important
  • Investors should realize that factors other than those identified above and in Item 1A and Exhibit 99 might prove important to the Company's future results. (graco.com)
  • Other experiments suggest BDNF is more important and necessary for neuronal survival than other factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • This list identifies fifty-two important factors that help to understand how the mind functions. (wikipedia.org)
  • KLF1 is a very important factor in red cell biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • John Dollard and Neal E. Miller's 1950 book Personality and Psychotherapy emphasized that the psychological principles and social conditions of learning are the most important common factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Differences are most stark when it comes to deciding which factor is the most important. (wikipedia.org)
  • approaches
  • In 1961, Jerome Frank published Persuasion and Healing, a book entirely devoted to examining the common factors among psychotherapies and related healing approaches. (wikipedia.org)
  • risk factor
  • Get introduced to the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). (lynda.com)
  • Narrator] In this section, I will explain…what is meant by risk factor surveillance. (lynda.com)
  • Then I will describe to you the two main systems…the US uses for risk factor surveillance:…the NHANES and the BRFSS. (lynda.com)
  • So what is risk factor surveillance? (lynda.com)
  • R provides an environment and a language you can use to analyze data, including the publicly available Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey (BRFSS) dataset. (lynda.com)
  • But having a risk factor, or even many, does not mean that you will get the disease. (cancer.org)
  • human
  • Other regulating factors of the human population at present are drinking water supply, amount of arable land (obviously a more fundamental term for food), air pollution and prevalence of communicable disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Human Factors is a peer-reviewed academic journal that publishes scientific studies in ergonomics. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • All regulating factors are density-dependent, meaning they keep populations at equilibrium by counteracting fluctuations in population size per unit area (or per unit volume for species living within three dimensional environments, such as water). (wikipedia.org)
  • explains
  • In energy monitoring and targeting, a driving factor is something recurrent and measurable whose variation explains variation in energy consumption. (wikipedia.org)
  • Geshe Tashi Tsering explains: The Tibetan for mental factors, semlay jungwa chö (Skt. (wikipedia.org)
  • healthcare
  • you may be tested when your healthcare practitioner wants to monitor the severity of a factor deficiency and/or the effectiveness of treatment. (labtestsonline.org)
  • Measuring coagulation factors can help a healthcare practitioner determine the cause of the bleeding and the best treatment. (labtestsonline.org)
  • effectiveness
  • This is in contrast to the view that the effectiveness of psychotherapy and counseling is best explained by specific or unique factors (notably, particular methods or procedures) that are suited to treatment of particular problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • A number of studies after 1975 presented more evidence in support of the general efficacy of psychotherapy, but the question of how common and specific factors could enhance or thwart therapy effectiveness in particular cases continued to fuel theoretical and empirical research over the following decades. (wikipedia.org)
  • main
  • The relationship between the main mind (Sanskrit: citta) and the mental factors can be described by the following metaphors: The main mind is like screen in a cinema, and the mental factors are like the images projected on the screen. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main mind is like a king who sits passively on a throne, and the mental factors are like the king's busy ministers. (wikipedia.org)
  • essential
  • Bhikkhu Bodhi states: "These factors perform the most rudimentary and essential cognitive functions, without which consciousness of an object would be utterly impossible. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Essential Factors model is an incident investigation model based on determining the essential and contributory factors that lead to an incident. (wikipedia.org)
  • Each essential factor, once identified is able to be reviewed for potential points of control. (wikipedia.org)
  • therefore
  • Therefore, food is a regulating factor in this scenario, as food supply keeps the population at relative equilibrium. (wikipedia.org)
  • change
  • Sol Garfield (who would later go on to edit many editions of the Handbook of Psychotherapy and Behavior Change with Allen Bergin) included a 10-page discussion of common factors in his 1957 textbook Introductory Clinical Psychology. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the same year, Carl Rogers published a paper outlining what he considered to be common factors (which he called "sufficient conditions") of successful therapeutic personality change, emphasizing the therapeutic relationship factors which would become central to the theory of person-centered therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Finally, it was shown that, when endogenous NF-κB is induced by TNFα (tumour necrosis factor α) treatment, HIF-1α levels also change in an NF-κB-dependent manner. (wikipedia.org)
  • found
  • These seven factors are: Phassa - contact Vedanā - feeling Saññā - perception Cetanā - volition Ekaggata - one-pointedness Jīvitindriya - life faculty Manasikāra - attention The six occasional or particular mental factors (pakiṇṇaka cetasikas) are ethically variable mental factors found only in certain consciousnesses. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the interpretation of the currently dominant view of classical economic theory developed by neoclassical economists, the term "factors" did not exist until after the classical period and is not to be found in any of the literature of that time. (wikipedia.org)
  • primary
  • There are two types of factors: primary and secondary. (wikipedia.org)
  • The previously mentioned primary factors are land, labour (the ability to work), and capital goods. (wikipedia.org)
  • The primary factors facilitate production but neither become part of the product (as with raw materials) nor become significantly transformed by the production process (as with fuel used to power machinery). (wikipedia.org)
  • release
  • Does glutamine methylation affect the intrinsic conformation of the universally conserved GGQ motif in ribosomal release factors? (wikipedia.org)
  • The decoding release factor binds to the A site of the ribosome and directly recognises the stop codon. (wikipedia.org)
  • Once RF1 (or RF2) is bound to the ribosome, the polypeptide is released, and the ribosome and release factors disassemble, thus completing the process of translation. (wikipedia.org)