• diseases
  • Although it is not completely clear what causes different people to develop different diseases as a result of infection with the same pathogenic bacteria, it is suspected that host phenotypic and epigenetic factors are the source of such variation. (wikipedia.org)
  • labour
  • Infection may be limited to the cavity and wall of her uterus, or it may spread beyond to cause septicaemia (blood poisoning) or other illnesses, especially when her resistance has been lowered by a long labour or severe bleeding. (wikipedia.org)
  • bacteria
  • Most infections involved a number of types of bacteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, S. dysgalactiae can also be group A. S. pyogenes is a beta-hemolytic species of Gram positive bacteria that is responsible for a wide range of both invasive and noninvasive infections. (wikipedia.org)
  • Severe infections are usually invasive, meaning that the bacteria has entered parts of the body where bacteria are not usually found, such as the blood, lungs, deep muscle or fat tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • Prevention
  • by H. A. Woodruff Research and the Pastoral Industry by T. Brailsford Robertson and H. A. Woodruff The Causation and Prevention of Puerperal Infection by R. Marshall Allan and H. A. Woodruff World Order or Anarchy? (wikipedia.org)
  • impetigo
  • The two most prominent infections of GAS are both non-invasive: strep throat (pharyngitis) where it causes 15- 30% of the childhood cases and 10% of adult cases, and impetigo. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most Common: impetigo, cellulitis, and erysipelas - infections of the skin which can be complicated by necrotizing fasciitis - skin, fascia and muscle strep throat AKA strep pharyngitis - pharynx Less Common: Bacteremia can be associated with these infections, but is not typical. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • Treatment of infections in burns was his focus and in 1942 he moved to Glasgow as Director of the Medical Research Council's Burns Unit in Glasgow's Royal Infirmary. (wikipedia.org)
  • Traitement de l'infection puerpérale (in collaboration with Victor Wallich), G. Steinheil, 1896 - Treatment of puerperal infection. (wikipedia.org)
  • abdominal
  • Another account states that the lower abdominal infection, la fièvre puerpérale, had raged every winter since 1774 among the maternity patients of the Hôtel-Dieu, and that often as many as 7 of every 12 patients suffered from it. (wikipedia.org)
  • complications
  • When the uterus defect is small or incomplete it can be closed surgically, though most often a hysterectomy is required to prevent further complications such as bleeding or infection. (eurorad.org)
  • cases
  • GBS was recognized as a pathogen in cattle by Edmond Nocard and Mollereau in the late 1880s, but its significance as a human pathogen was not discovered before 1938, when Fry described three fatal cases of puerperal infections caused by GBS. (wikipedia.org)
  • Signs
  • The post-operative period was uneventful for the mother but the baby showed signs of infection and required admission to the special care baby unit. (gponline.com)