• Person-Centere
  • In the same year, Carl Rogers published a paper outlining what he considered to be common factors (which he called "sufficient conditions") of successful therapeutic personality change, emphasizing the therapeutic relationship factors which would become central to the theory of person-centered therapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • therapeutic
  • From the 1930s through the 1950s, numerous analysts were engaged with the question of how to shorten the course of therapy but still achieve therapeutic effectiveness. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alexander found that the patients who tended to benefit the most greatly from therapy were those who could rapidly engage, could describe a specific therapeutic focus, and could quickly move to an experience of their previously warded-off feelings. (wikipedia.org)
  • Principles of change are shared by all theoretic orientations of therapy, and include strategies such as: promoting client belief in the effectiveness of therapy, the formation and maintenance of a therapeutic alliance with the client, facilitating client awareness of the factors influencing their problems, and encouraging the client to engage in corrective experiences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Toward
  • In 1983, Robbins received the Felix and Helene Deutsch Prize presented by the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute for his paper, "Toward a New Mind Model for the Primitive Personalities. (wikipedia.org)
  • unconscious
  • His psychoanalytic research has focused on how the mind works in western and non-western cultures, particularly with regard to schizophrenia and other psychoses, language, creativity, conscious and unconscious mental processes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Alexander
  • Franz Gabriel Alexander (22 January 1891 - 8 March 1964) was a Hungarian-American psychoanalyst and physician, who is considered one of the founders of psychosomatic medicine and psychoanalytic criminology. (wikipedia.org)
  • theoretical
  • The third route to integration commonly recognized in the literature is theoretical integration in which "two or more therapies are integrated in the hope that the result will be better than the constituent therapies alone" (Norcross, 2005, p. 8). (wikipedia.org)
  • outcome
  • Thus, for these and other reasons it can be argued that the NICE emphasis on RCTs as the gold standard in the research evaluation of psychological therapy outcome is as unfounded as its evidence base is weak. (rcpsych.org)
  • Coding therapist and child interaction: Progress and outcome in play therapy. (springer.com)
  • Institute
  • there he was part of an influential group of German analysts mentored by Karl Abraham, including Karen Horney and Helene Deutsch, and gathered around the Berlin Psychoanalytic Institute. (wikipedia.org)
  • Additionally, he graduated from and is a member of the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute. (wikipedia.org)
  • He later became clinical professor of psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco and was on the faculty of the Psychoanalytic Institute of Northern California. (wikipedia.org)
  • literature
  • Thanks to Freud's groundbreaking 1911 analysis of Schreber's book, the "Schreber case" became a staple of psychoanalytic literature, one which highlighted Freud's thesis that Schreber's second episode of mental illness, especially his so-called paranoia, was caused by passive homosexual desires towards his first psychiatrist, Paul Flechsig. (wikipedia.org)
  • He returned to his writing and therapy practice in New York City in 1951 and finished his University of Chicago literature dissertation, The Structure of Literature, in 1954. (wikipedia.org)
  • therapist
  • Major themes in describing the child therapy focus on compensation for visual cues, utilization of the guide dog as a pet therapist, proxemics and mirroring in relation to blindness, and the impact of the "wounded healer" on clients. (springer.com)
  • Renowned Priory Hospital Therapist and listed with the famous Harley Therapy which represents a gold standard of care. (counselling-directory.org.uk)