• inhabitant
  • In all oligotropic aquatic ecosystems, which contain high-dissolved oxygen content but low plant nutrients throughout, P.aeruginosa is the predominant inhabitant and this clearly makes it the most abundant organism on earth (2). (kenyon.edu)
  • coli
  • Hol by itself, when expressed in a broad host-range expression vector under IPTG control exhibited strong lytic activity in both P. aeruginosa and E. coli. (wikipedia.org)
  • cystic fibrosis
  • Full results from the phase III trials and future studies are likely to expand the use of ceftazidime/avibactam to include hospitalized adults with nosocomial and ventilator-associated pneumonia, hospitalized pediatric patients aged 3 months to 18 years with complicated intra-abdominal infections, and patients with cystic fibrosis who have resistant respiratory P aeruginosa infections. (medscape.com)
  • aerobic
  • P. aeruginosa is an obligate respirer, using aerobic respiration (with oxygen) as its optimal metabolism although can also respire anaerobically on nitrate or other alternative electron acceptors. (kenyon.edu)
  • Pseudomonas aeruginosa is one of the most commonly considered gram-negative aerobic bacilli in the differential diagnosis of gram-negative infections. (uptodate.com)
  • oxygen
  • P. aeruginosa is a facultative anaerobe, as it is well adapted to proliferate in conditions of partial or total oxygen depletion. (wikipedia.org)
  • exposure
  • This study showed P. aeruginosa's characteristic pigmentation: P. aeruginosa produced water-soluble pigments, which, on exposure to ultraviolet light, fluoresced blue-green light. (kenyon.edu)
  • Family
  • The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Hol Holin (Hol Holin) Family (TC# 1.E.20) is a group of transporters belonging to the Holin Superfamily III. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular and Cellular Biology portal As of this edit, this article uses content from "1.E.20 The Pseudomonas aeruginosa Hol Holin (Hol Holin) Family", which is licensed in a way that permits reuse under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License, but not under the GFDL. (wikipedia.org)
  • green
  • In 1882, the first scientific study on P. aeruginosa , entitled "On the blue and green coloration of bandages," was published by a pharmacist named Carle Gessard. (kenyon.edu)
  • This blue-green pigment is a combination of two metabolites of P. aeruginosa, pyocyanin (blue) and pyoverdine (green), which impart the blue-green characteristic color of cultures. (wikipedia.org)
  • uses
  • To overcome this and regulate proper intake of iron, P. aeruginosa uses siderophores, which are secreted molecules that bind and transport iron. (wikipedia.org)
  • cells
  • P. aeruginosa can adhere to the epithelial cells through use of its fimbriae, which bind to specific receptors on host epithelial cells, such as galactose, mannose, or sialic acid receptors. (kenyon.edu)