• GTPase
  • Enhances GTPase-activating protein (GAP) activity of regulator of G protein signaling (RGS) proteins, hence involved in the termination of the signaling initiated by the G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) by accelerating the GTP hydrolysis on the G-alpha subunits, thereby promoting their inactivation (Probable). (uniprot.org)
  • Increases RGS9 GTPase-activating protein (GAP) activity, hence contributes to the deactivation of G protein signaling initiated by D 2 dopamine receptors (By similarity). (uniprot.org)
  • The beta and gamma chains are required for the GTPase activity, for replacement of GDP by GTP, and for G protein-effector interaction. (uniprot.org)
  • molecule
  • Protein structure is the three-dimensional arrangement of atoms in an amino acid-chain molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • Proteins form by amino acids undergoing condensation reactions, in which the amino acids lose one water molecule per reaction in order to attach to one another with a peptide bond. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is strictly recommended to use the words "amino acid residues" when discussing proteins because when a peptide bond is formed, a water molecule is lost, and therefore proteins are made up of amino acid residues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Molecular
  • To understand the functions of proteins at a molecular level, it is often necessary to determine their three-dimensional structure. (wikipedia.org)
  • amino
  • Single chains of amino acids that are the units of multimeric Proteins . (jove.com)
  • Proteins are polymers - specifically polypeptides - formed from sequences of amino acids, the monomers of the polymer. (wikipedia.org)
  • By convention, a chain under 30 amino acids is often identified as a peptide, rather than a protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • Protein structures range in size from tens to several thousand amino acids. (wikipedia.org)
  • The primary structure of a protein refers to the sequence of amino acids in the polypeptide chain. (wikipedia.org)
  • The sequence of amino acids in insulin was discovered by Frederick Sanger, establishing that proteins have defining amino acid sequences. (wikipedia.org)
  • The two different subunits of LDH: LDHA also known as the M subunit of LDH, and LDHB also known as the H subunit of LDH both retain the same active site, and the same amino acids participating in the reaction. (wikipedia.org)
  • This leads to the addition of seven amino acid acids to the normal LDH-H protein. (wikipedia.org)
  • PsaA and PsaB are both integral membrane proteins of 730 to 750 amino acids that seem to contain 11 transmembrane segments. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1996
  • 1996). "Selectively enhanced cellular signaling by Gi proteins in essential hypertension. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eva Julia Neer (1937-2000) was an American physician (Columbia University P&S), biochemist, and cell-biology scientist who gained U.S. national research awards (FASEB 1987 & American Heart Association 1996) for her discoveries on G-protein subunit structure and function. (wikipedia.org)
  • cytosol
  • The protein encoded by this gene is localized to the mitochondria and may play pivotal roles in the malate-aspartate shuttle that operates in the metabolic coordination between cytosol and mitochondria. (wikipedia.org)
  • interactions
  • To be able to perform their biological function, proteins fold into one or more specific spatial conformations driven by a number of non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, ionic interactions, Van der Waals forces, and hydrophobic packing. (wikipedia.org)
  • The folding is driven by the non-specific hydrophobic interactions, the burial of hydrophobic residues from water, but the structure is stable only when the parts of a protein domain are locked into place by specific tertiary interactions, such as salt bridges, hydrogen bonds, and the tight packing of side chains and disulfide bonds. (wikipedia.org)
  • homologous
  • The simplest explanation that accounts for all previous and current observations is that the five homologous proteins are single ion transporters. (lu.se)
  • actin
  • F-actin-capping proteins bind in a Ca 2+ -independent manner to the fast growing ends of actin filaments (barbed end) thereby blocking the exchange of subunits at these ends. (uniprot.org)
  • Unlike other capping proteins (such as gelsolin and severin), these proteins do not sever actin filaments. (uniprot.org)
  • transmembrane
  • Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) are involved as a modulator or transducer in various transmembrane signaling systems. (uniprot.org)
  • The Kir subunits have two transmembrane spans and form the channel's pore. (wikipedia.org)
  • The SUR subunits have three additional transmembrane domains, and contain two nucleotide-binding domains on the cytoplasmic side. (wikipedia.org)
  • The two cysteines in both proteins are proximal and located in a loop between the ninth and tenth transmembrane segments. (wikipedia.org)
  • plastocyanin is an electron carrier that transfers the electron from cytochrome b6f to the P700 cofactor of PS I. The Ycf4 protein domain is found on the thylakoid membrane and is vital to photosystem I. This thylakoid transmembrane protein helps assemble the components of photosystem I, without it, photosynthesis would be inefficient. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissues
  • In order to dissect out different aspects of G protein messaging complexities Eva studied a variety of tissues including brain cortex, rat testis, pigeon erythrocytes, heart, brain, retina-rods. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regulation
  • The encoded protein is upregulated in the transition from the G0 to G1/S phase of the cell cycle and may actively participate in cell cycle regulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • This protein may use the morpheein model of allosteric regulation. (wikipedia.org)