• thus
  • As the patron saint of the Catholic Church, Aquinas has thus passed on a large part of Aristotle's ethics to Christians the world over. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • Most scholars of Buddhist ethics thus rely on the examination of Buddhist scriptures, and the use of anthropological evidence from traditional Buddhist societies, to justify claims about the nature of Buddhist ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Scotland (ICAS) Code of Ethics is based on the IESBA Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus, while a utilitarian based land ethic can be used to support economic activity, it can also be used to challenge this activity. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1996
  • Catholicism portal Health portal Abortion-rights movements Anti-abortion movements Buddhism Jainism Consistent life ethic Culture of life Fetal protection Medical ethics National Sanctity of Human Life Day (in the US) Religion and abortion Right to life Sanctity of Life Act, US bill, repeatedly introduced since 1995, that has never become law Drutchas, Geoffrey Gilbert (1996). (wikipedia.org)
  • fundamental principles
  • The Olympic Charter is the codification of the Fundamental Principles, Rules and Bye-laws adopted by the International Olympic Committee. (olympic.org)
  • The 2016 edition of the IOC Code of Ethics provides a clear explanation of the scope of application of the Code, a description of the fundamental principles of Olympism, definitions of what constitutes integrity of conduct and integrity of competitions for the IOC and the main Olympic Movement stakeholders, as well as reporting obligations. (olympic.org)
  • These fundamental principles, which can be grasped by reason, are contained in 'the Divine Law - eternal, objective and universal - whereby God orders, directs and governs the entire universe and all the ways of the human community, by a plan conceived in wisdom and love. (vatican.va)
  • human
  • In Love, Power and Justice, Hatcher outlines a system of ethics based on the principle that there is a universal human nature. (wikipedia.org)
  • Unsanctifying Human Life: essays on ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lawrence Kohlberg, famous for work on moral development as a part of human development, eventually joined Gilligan in starting a descriptive ethics of relationship conduct in what they called the ethical community or just community. (wikipedia.org)
  • Leopold offers an ecologically-based land ethic that rejects strictly human-centered views of the environment and focuses on the preservation of healthy, self-renewing ecosystems. (wikipedia.org)
  • metaphysics
  • Socrates was not, and neither were the pre-Socratic philosophers: he developed no metaphysics, for example, and the pre-Socratics developed no ethics. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • His influence on Western thought is considerable, and much of modern philosophy developed or opposed his ideas, particularly in the areas of ethics, natural law, metaphysics, and political theory. (wikipedia.org)
  • conduct
  • The Code of Ethics of the World Federation of Occupational Therapists describes the appropriate conduct of occupational therapists practising in all fields of occupational therapy. (skynet.be)
  • A central aspect of ethics is "the good life", the life worth living or life that is simply satisfying, which is held by many philosophers to be more important than traditional moral conduct. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ethics is defined as, among others, the entirety of rules of proper moral conduct corresponding to the ideology of a particular society or organization (Eduard). (wikipedia.org)
  • Despite the differences in ethical values, there is a growing common ground of what is considered good conduct and correct conduct with ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regulatory ethics is a body of law and practical political philosophy that governs the conduct of civil servants and the members of regulatory agencies. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1998
  • Donald R. C. Reed, whose book Following Kohlberg: Liberalism and the Practice of Democratic Community (1998) outlined the extension of these principles to deliberative democracy, claims that "During the four years following publication of Gilligan's In a Different Voice (1982), Kohlberg and Gilligan both revised their accounts of moral development so that they converged far more than is commonly recognized. (wikipedia.org)
  • integrity
  • Based on Bill Daniels commitment to ethics and integrity, the Daniels Fund Ethics Initiative was launched in 2010 with select business schools from universities in Colorado, New Mexico, Utah, and Wyoming. (wikipedia.org)
  • focuses
  • As with previous editions, the 4th edition of Ethics and Law for the Health Professions focuses on issues that are relevant both to clinicians and to health-policy-makers. (wildy.com)
  • In physical therapy, studies on ethics reporting are limited to few aspects, and none focuses on stroke research. (deepdyve.com)
  • Practice
  • The WFOT Code of Ethics is designed to offer broad guidelines for the practice of occupational therapy. (skynet.be)
  • The COTEC Standard of Practice is intended to refine ethics to more specific and detailed principles. (skynet.be)
  • The Standard of Practice and the Code of Ethics for our profession are therefore very closely linked. (skynet.be)
  • Both the Code of Ethics and the Standard of Practice are the established methods or sets of rules dealing with behaving etc ., a particular situation (Chambers 20th Century Dictionary 1983). (skynet.be)
  • As all National Associations of Occupational Therapy in Europe are members or Associate members of WFOT it is deemed fitting that COTEC should base its Standards of Practice on this code. (skynet.be)
  • evidence-based clinical practice in many fields, including A random sample of RCTs indexed in PubMed was physical therapy . (deepdyve.com)
  • nonprofit
  • The asynchronous (or self-paced) format of most online MBA in nonprofit management programs is also ideal for students with other commitments that may interfere with campus-based education, such as part-time employment or family obligations. (bestcolleges.com)
  • research
  • ARHP advocates for evidence-based research and supports the availability of, and education about, a wide range of safe, effective, and appropriate new technologies to enhance the health of all women. (arhp.org)
  • Earlier in this report we summarized the high-impact educational practices promoted by AAC&U: First Year Seminar and Experiences, Common Intellectual Experiences, Learning Communities, Writing-Intensive Courses, Collaborative Assignments and Projects, Undergraduate Research, Diversity and Global Learning, Service Learning and Community-Based Learning, Internships, and Capstone Courses and Projects. (csbsju.edu)
  • Di Bari, Mauro 2018-06-05 00:00:00 Background: Adequate reporting of ethics-related research methods promotes convergence on best ethics practices. (deepdyve.com)
  • Based on a sample of RCTs of study have a symbiotic relationship and, in order to physical therapy interventions after stroke, our objectives make readers able to fully evaluate clinical research, both were to investigate the reporting of multiple ethics-related should be appropriately reported . (deepdyve.com)
  • Adequate reporting features and its variation over time, as well as the charac- of research findings may promote the implementation of teristics of the studies associated with ethics reporting. (deepdyve.com)
  • To be methods receives considerably greater attention, as com- included, the studies had to be published in English in pared with reporting of research ethics issues . (deepdyve.com)
  • For example, the Belmont Report defines 3 key principles by which to judge the ethicality of biomedical and behavioral research. (wikipedia.org)
  • seeks
  • The concept of inviolability is an important tie between the ethics of religion and the ethics of law, as each seeks justification for its principles as based on both purity and natural concept, as well as in universality of application. (wikipedia.org)
  • promotes
  • The International Ethics Standards Board for Accountants (IESBA) develops and promotes ethical standards and guidance for professional accountants. (wikipedia.org)
  • issues
  • Virtually every moral philosopher has to deal with the issues grappled with in the Nicomachean Ethics, and many of the positions argued for by Aristotle have been adopted, sometimes in an almost wholesale fashion, by other philosophers. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • Although he had great respect for Plato, he eventually came to disagree with him on a number of issues, some of them in ethics. (barnesandnoble.com)
  • By definition, these issues involve ethics. (biblicalworldview21.org)
  • The IESBA also supports debate on issues related to accounting ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Reporting of ethics-related issues was analyzed. (deepdyve.com)
  • Multiple regression was used to evaluate the relationship between ethics-related issues reporting and some studies' characteristics. (deepdyve.com)
  • 001), and number of ethics-related issues reported (p = .009). (deepdyve.com)
  • Post-hoc comparisons showed significantly greater reporting of ethics issues in trials published in the year 2014 compared to 2004 (p = .014, 95%CI = 0.40/4.26). (deepdyve.com)
  • The student is positioned into a role where participation means understanding and resolving multiple issues of ethics, including the actions of his or her professor or instructor. (wikipedia.org)
  • code
  • The popular meaning of ethics is that it is a code of behaviour considered correct, especially to a particular group, profession or individual. (skynet.be)
  • Member bodies of the IFAC such as Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales (ICAEW) and the other CCAB bodies must comply with the principles included in the IFAC Code of Ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2010 the IESBA issued a revised Code of Ethics for Professional Accountants to be effective from 1 January 2011. (wikipedia.org)
  • philosophy
  • Although he made significant contributions to the fields of mathematics and philosophy, he is perhaps best known for developing a new proof of God's existence based on first-order logic and for his work towards a transcultural system of ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • closely
  • Utilitarianism has often been used when deciding how to use land and it is closely connected with an economic based ethic. (wikipedia.org)
  • rules
  • However, the principles-based IFAC standards continue to differ in several respects from the more rules-based standards of the American Institute of Certified Public Accountants (AICPA) maintained by its Professional Ethics Executive Committee. (wikipedia.org)
  • society
  • Christian ethics has a teleological aspect-all ethical behavior is oriented towards a vision of the Kingdom of God-a righteous society where all live in peace and harmony with God and nature, as envisioned in the Book of Isaiah. (wikipedia.org)
  • Introduction
  • This required second year course provides an introduction to the related fields of business ethics and corporate social responsibility. (queensu.ca)
  • Business
  • It calculates and records business transactions and prepares financial statements for the external users in accordance with generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP). (wikipedia.org)
  • Standard
  • Ethics are an accountability standard by which the public will scrutinize the work being conducted by the members of these organizations. (wikipedia.org)
  • account
  • The Moderate objectivism account of moral principles is based on the ethics of Sir William David Ross (1877-1940). (wikipedia.org)
  • The base of computare is putare, which "variously meant to prune, to purify, to correct an account, hence, to count or calculate, as well as to think. (wikipedia.org)
  • The question of ethics emerges in the public sector on account of its subordinate character. (wikipedia.org)
  • general
  • Christian ethics in general has tended to stress the need for love, grace, mercy, and forgiveness because of sin. (wikipedia.org)
  • This idea of control and power conflicts with the underlying principle of being a steward to the general public. (wikipedia.org)
  • Program
  • Program costs can vary between public and private schools and based on the size of a school's student body. (bestcolleges.com)
  • The US office of government ethics was initiated by the Ethics in Government Act of 1978 to provide overall leadership and policy direction for an ethics program in the Executive branch of government. (wikipedia.org)
  • leadership
  • Daniels Scholarships give motivated high school seniors with leadership, character, ethics, and a commitment to give back to their communities, the opportunity to obtain a four-year degree from the university of their choice. (wikipedia.org)
  • public
  • The purposes of these are to provide a public statement of the principles established for occupational therapists and students by the professional body. (skynet.be)
  • Ethics in the public sector is a broad topic that is usually considered a branch of political ethics. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the public sector, ethics addresses the fundamental premise of a public administrator's duty as a "steward" to the public. (wikipedia.org)
  • Having such a distinction ensures that public administrators are not acting on an internal set of ethical principles without first questioning whether those principles would hold to public scrutiny. (wikipedia.org)
  • Public sector ethics is an attempt to create a more open atmosphere within governmental operations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Altogether the US model of Public sector ethics has become highly regulated and, some would say, cumbersome. (wikipedia.org)
  • culture
  • It will introduces ethical analysis, decision making processes, as well as the role of ethics in corporate governance, and the need for an ethical corporate culture. (queensu.ca)
  • specific
  • A citizen's freedom of speech, for example, does not allow someone to yell "FIRE" in a crowded theater when there is no fire as individual Constitutional Rights and Liberties are constrained by other individual rights and liberties and therefore they must be specified for specific situations and then balanced with the other inevitable competing principles. (wikipedia.org)
  • religion
  • In religion and ethics, inviolability or sanctity of life is a principle of implied protection regarding aspects of sentient life which are said to be holy, sacred, or otherwise of such value that they are not to be violated. (wikipedia.org)
  • quality
  • The sanctity of life principle, which is often contrasted with the "quality of life" to some extent, is the basis of all Catholic teaching about the fifth commandment in the Ten Commandments. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sanctity of Life: or, Quality of Life in the Context of Ethics, Medicine, and Law: A Study. (wikipedia.org)