• time
  • United States law holds that posthumous children of U.S. citizens who are born outside the United States have the same rights to citizenship that they would have had if the deceased U.S. citizen parent had been alive at the time of their birth. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Roman law also envisaged that if a slave mother had been free for any period between the time of the conception and childbirth, the child would be regarded as born free. (wikipedia.org)
  • life
  • We must remember that while the organ donor may have a posthumous preference frustrated, (more of which anon) and her friends and relatives may be distressed and upset, the potential organ recipient stands to lose her very life and her friends and relatives will have grief to add to their distress. (bmj.com)
  • He held a conception altogether his own of the life of plants, and assigned simple souls to animals, which expire with their death. (wikipedia.org)
  • Several Hindu texts on ethics and righteousness, such as Dharmaśāstra, give fetus a right to life from conception, although in practice such texts are not always followed. (wikipedia.org)
  • child
  • A posthumous birth is a birth of a child after the death of a biological parent. (wikipedia.org)
  • A person born in these circumstances is called a posthumous child or a posthumously born person. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most instances of posthumous birth involve the birth of a child after the death of its father, but the term is also applied to infants delivered after the death of the mother, usually by caesarean section. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, Massachusetts law states that a posthumous child is treated as having been living at the death of the parent, meaning that the child receives the same share of the parent's estate as if the child had been born before the parent's death. (wikipedia.org)