• volume
  • Polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), also commonly called polyvidone or povidone, is a water-soluble polymer made from the monomer N-vinylpyrrolidone: PVP was used as a plasma volume expander for trauma victims after the 1950s. (wikipedia.org)
  • A change in plasma osmotic pressure alters the hematocrit, that is, the volume concentration of red cells in the whole blood by redistributing water between the intravascular and extravascular spaces. (wikipedia.org)
  • Packed red blood cells, plasma or whole blood should not be used solely for volume expansion or to increase oncotic pressure of circulating blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other causes of either absolute (dehydration, loss of plasma via wound/burns) or relative (third space losses) vascular volume depletion also respond, although blood products are only indicated if significantly anemic. (wikipedia.org)
  • early
  • Secondary Hypotheses- The early use of a universal donor blood plasma (AB+ plasma) in patients with shock due to blood loss (i.e. hemorrhagic) going for emergency surgery will reduce overall exposure to the total number of blood donor products (so-called allogeneic blood exposure). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Early attempts and optimism in developing blood substitutes were very quickly confronted with significant side effects which according to for that time actual level of knowledge and technology could not be promptly eliminated. (wikipedia.org)
  • main
  • The main categories of 'oxygen-carrying' blood substitutes being pursued are hemoglobin-based oxygen carriers (HBOC) and perfluorocarbon-based oxygen carriers (PFBOC). (wikipedia.org)
  • either
  • Patients will receive either 2 units of AB+ plasma or 2 units of hydroxyethylated starch control solution once they are sent to the OR for emergency surgery to address etiology for hemorrhagic shock. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • patients
  • Primary Hypothesis- A multicentre trial that investigates the earlier use of plasma in patients with hemorrhagic shock going for emergency surgery will be feasible. (clinicaltrials.gov)