• bees
  • Rapeseed ( Brassica napus ) is important in agriculture not only as an oil-producing plant and a source of animal food, but also as a nectar provider for honey bees every spring. (phys.org)
  • Beekeepers set up their beehives in the vicinity of rapeseed fields, so that the worker bees can gather nectar This ensures that the rapeseed flowers are pollinated and a high crop yield will be obtained. (phys.org)
  • In spring the scented, nectar-rich blooms provide a valuable source of food for bees and other insects. (thompson-morgan.com)
  • Border Free Bees, a UBC art project under the direction of Holmes, is inviting people who live in Kelowna's lower Mission neighbourhood to join the Kelowna Nectar Trail Project. (infotel.ca)
  • Bees live off a diet of simple syrups in the form of nectar. (slashdot.org)
  • Bees produce honey from the sugary secretions of plants (floral nectar) or other insects (aphid honeydew) through regurgitation, enzymatic activity, and water evaporation. (wikipedia.org)
  • During foraging, bees access part of the nectar collected to support metabolic activity of flight muscles, with the majority of collected nectar destined for regurgitation, digestion, and storage as honey. (wikipedia.org)
  • In the hive or in a wild nest, the three types of bees are: a single female queen bee a seasonally variable number of male drone bees to fertilize new queens 20,000 to 40,000 female worker bees Leaving the hive, foraging bees collect sugar-rich flower nectar and return to the hive where they use their "honey stomachs" to ingest and regurgitate the nectar repeatedly until it is partially digested. (wikipedia.org)
  • pollination
  • This particular nectar, which is produced by special glands called "extrafloral nectaries", has nothing to do with pollination, but attracts ants to the herbivore-attacked plants as defenders against their pests. (phys.org)
  • The fact that jasmonic acid regulates so many functions, such as plant defense and pollination, is extremely interesting and raises new questions, especially concerning the evolution of these control mechanisms," says Martin Heil, the leader of the study. (phys.org)
  • As a result, the Cuban oriole takes the plant's nectar without contributing to pollination. (wikipedia.org)
  • secretion
  • When we put caterpillars on the rapeseed leaves to elicit jasmonic acid production, the nectar secretion of the flowers was not affected," the researcher says. (phys.org)
  • Venkatesan Radhika, Christian Kost, Wilhelm Boland, Martin Heil: The role of jasmonates in floral nectar secretion. (phys.org)
  • New research from a team led by Carnegie's Wolf Frommer, director of the Plant Biology Department, in collaboration with the Carter lab in Minnesota and the Baldwin lab in Jena, Germany, now identified key components of the sugar synthesis and secretion mechanisms. (bio-medicine.org)
  • In parallel, they also identified genes necessary for the production of sucrose, called sucrose phosphate synthase genes, which turned out to also be essential for nectar secretion. (bio-medicine.org)
  • species
  • Radhika Venkatesan, PhD student at the International Max Planck Research School in Jena, studied Brassica napus , a widespread and agriculturally important plant species. (phys.org)
  • Such sites would have historically supported oak barrens, pine barrens, dry sand, and dry-mesic prairies containing a wide variety of mid to late summer blooming plant species. (msu.edu)
  • They identified the transport protein SWEET9 as a key player in three diverse flowering plant species and demonstrated that it is essential for nectar production. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Plant Species Biology. (northampton.ac.uk)
  • Whitetail deer, which do not browse the grass, may facilitate spread by browsing on native species and thereby reducing competition for the exotic plant. (wikipedia.org)
  • Invasion of Microstegium can reduce growth and flowering of native species, suppress native plant communities, alter and suppress insect communities, slow plant succession and alter nutrient cycling. (wikipedia.org)
  • These species are known to feed on nectar and produce honey. (wikipedia.org)
  • The most common food plants of the common tiger in peninsular India are small herbs, twiners and creepers from the family Asclepiadaceae, including: Asclepias curassavica Ceropegia intermedia Cynanchum dalhousieae Raphistemma pulchellum Stephanotis species (including S. floribunda? (wikipedia.org)
  • herbivores
  • By producing jasmonates the plant regulates its defense against herbivores e.g. by stimulating the synthesis of toxins. (phys.org)
  • She found that when its flower tissues produced jasmonates during an early developmental stage, nectar production was immediately activated, regardless of whether the plant had been attacked by herbivores or not. (phys.org)
  • This clearly indicates that jasmonic acid has different functions in the different plant tissues: whereas the hormone activates defense mechanisms against herbivores in the leaves and the shoot of the plant, it regulates nectar production in the flower tissue. (phys.org)
  • Trail
  • Nectar Trail "wannabees" and people in the community are invited to attend the following free workshops as part of The Kelowna Nectar Trail sessions. (infotel.ca)
  • The Kelowna Nectar Trail Sessions are supported by the Okanagan Regional Library and Summerhill Winery. (infotel.ca)
  • habitat
  • Loss of milkweed host plants due to extensive herbicide use has been identified as a major contributing factor, and habitat loss and degradation from other causes, natural disease and predation, climate change, and widespread insecticide use are probably also contributing to declines. (xerces.org)
  • The Resource Center is where you can find regional information about plant lists, habitat conservation guides, and more. (xerces.org)
  • The migration begins and the ideal habitat required for successful migration changes to a 'corridor' (to Mexico) of available nectaring plants, optimal temperatures, tailwinds and low precipitation. (wikipedia.org)
  • flower
  • During her studies, a scientist from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology has discovered that the plant hormone jasmonic acid - known as a signalling molecule after herbivory - not only regulates flower development in the bud stage, but also triggers nectar production. (phys.org)
  • Wilhelm Boland, director at the Max Planck Institute in Jena, emphasizes: "The more we know about the hormonal effects on flower development and nectar production in agricultural crops like rapeseed, the better we can use this knowledge to ensure high yields. (phys.org)
  • These plants all have sturdy branches that help hold the large flower heads up with minimal flopping. (wordpress.com)
  • butterfly
  • This butterfly lays its egg singly under the leaves of any of its host plants of family Asclepiadaceae. (wikipedia.org)
  • Egg Caterpillar Pupa male, Kerala The caterpillar of the common tiger butterfly obtains a supply of poison by eating poisonous plants, which make the caterpillar and butterfly a distasteful morsel for predators. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1988. Recovery Plan for Seven Coastal Plants and the Myrtle's Silverspot Butterfly. (wikipedia.org)
  • Six plants and Myrtle's Silverspot Butterfly from Coastal Dunes in Northern and Central California Determined to be Endangered. (wikipedia.org)
  • genes
  • Spider silk provides a combination of lightness, strength and elasticity that is superior to that of synthetic materials, and spider silk genes have been inserted into mammals and plants to see if these can be used as silk factories. (wikipedia.org)
  • exotic
  • Changes in natural fire patterns, introduction of exotic plants, and successional changes in the plant community have reduced the availability of host plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • resources
  • In areas where knapweed is managed, it may be desirable to establish plants that bloom during the same period to maintain these resources in the landscape. (msu.edu)
  • early
  • Their work also suggests that the components were recruited for this purpose early during the evolution of flowering plants. (bio-medicine.org)