• diabetes insipidus
  • Headache (obstructive hydrocephalus) Hypersomnia Myxedema post surgical weight gain Polydipsia Polyuria (diabetes insipidus) Vision loss (bitemporal hemianopia) Vomiting often occurs post treatment Growth hormone (GH) insufficiency, caused by the reduction in growth hormone (GH) production. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neurohypophysial
  • The finding of significant amounts of this classically "neurohypophysial" hormone outside the central nervous system raises many questions regarding its possible importance in these different tissues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Their main role is to assist in the storage and release of neurohypophysial hormones. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1954
  • Under Professor Shinji Ito, Arimura began his groundbreaking endocrinology dissertation on posterior pituitary hormones, ultimately getting published in Nature (Itoh and Arimura 1954) and attracting global attention. (wikipedia.org)
  • released into the bloodstream
  • Oxytocin is released into the bloodstream as a hormone in response to stretching of the cervix and uterus during labor and with stimulation of the nipples from breastfeeding . (wikipedia.org)
  • Specific endopeptidases in the cell cleave the prohormone just before it is released into the bloodstream, generating the mature hormone form of the molecule. (wikipedia.org)
  • Liver
  • His research on posterior pituitary hormones and their effects on liver fat helped initiate a research program at School of Medicine, Toronto University the findings of which explained the lipotropic actions of choline, betaine and methionine. (wikipedia.org)
  • peptide hormone
  • / ˌ ɒ k s ɪ ˈ t oʊ s ɪ n / ) is a peptide hormone and neuropeptide . (wikipedia.org)
  • ˌɒksɪˈtoʊsɪn/) is a peptide hormone and neuropeptide. (wikipedia.org)
  • Preprohormones, peptide hormone precursors, are then processed in several stages, typically in the endoplasmic reticulum, including removal of the N-terminal signal sequence and sometimes glycosylation, resulting in prohormones. (wikipedia.org)
  • When a peptide hormone binds to a receptor on the surface of the cell, a second messenger appears in the cytoplasm, which triggers signal transduction leading to the cellular responses. (wikipedia.org)
  • physiological
  • The physiological role of posterior pituitary alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone in ultraviolet radiation-induced skin pigmentation. (nii.ac.jp)
  • HR-1xHR/De) F1, this study was conducted to investigate the physiological role of posterior pituitary alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (alphaMSH) in UV radiation (UVR) -induced skin pigmentation. (nii.ac.jp)
  • Publications] Murai, I.: 'The physiological role of posterior pituitary alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone in ultraviolet radiation-induced skin pigmentation' J.Nihon Univ.Med.Ass.54(5). (nii.ac.jp)
  • A hormone is a substance that acts as a messenger from one cell to another to effect a physiological activity. (ebscohost.com)
  • Peptides
  • Peptide hormones or protein hormones are hormones whose molecules are peptides or proteins, respectively. (wikipedia.org)
  • the latter, being lipid-soluble, move through the plasma membranes of target cells (both cytoplasmic and nuclear) to act within their nuclei Like all peptides and proteins, peptide hormones and protein hormones are synthesized in cells from amino acids according to mRNA transcripts, which are synthesized from DNA templates inside the cell nucleus. (wikipedia.org)
  • stalk
  • They arise from the cells along the pituitary stalk, specifically from nests of odontogenic (tooth-forming) epithelium within the suprasellar/diencephalic region and, therefore, contain deposits of calcium that are evident on an x-ray. (wikipedia.org)
  • This elevation occurs as a result of the compression of the pituitary stalk, which interferes with the brain's control of prolactin production. (wikipedia.org)
  • Luteinizing
  • The acronym LHRH stands for luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone. (ebscohost.com)
  • LRF refers to luteinizing hormone releasing factor. (ebscohost.com)
  • Arimura returned to Japan to assist his old professor Ito at the Hokkaido University School of Medicine in 1961, and then moved back to the US to work with Dr. Schally, successfully beating the Schally lab's research competitor, Dr. Roger Guillemin's lab, in the race to purify and characterize the luteinizing-hormone releasing hormone. (wikipedia.org)
  • blood
  • Hypertrophy and hyperplasia of lactotrophs during pregnancy results in the enlargement of the anterior pituitary, without a corresponding increase in blood supply. (physicsforums.com)
  • Some neurotransmitters are secreted and released in a similar fashion to peptide hormones, and some 'neuropeptides' may be used as neurotransmitters in the nervous system in addition to acting as hormones when released into the blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissues
  • Peptide hormones are produced by many different organs and tissues, including the heart (atrial-natriuretic peptide (ANP) or atrial natriuretic factor (ANF)) and pancreas (glucagon, insulin and somatostatin), the gastrointestinal tract (cholecystokinin, gastrin), and adipose tissue stores (leptin). (wikipedia.org)