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  • Astronomy
  • The UK Department of Physics and Astronomy comprises 30 regular and 5 active adjunct and/or emeritus faculty members, 8 post-doctoral researchers, 16 office and technical staff members, 78 graduate and 71 undergraduate students. (uky.edu)
  • Undergraduate majors and graduate students take a complete array of courses with small class sizes spanning modern topics in physics and astronomy, and they work closely with faculty researchers in studies of nuclear and particle physics, condensed matter and atomic physics, and astronomy and astrophysics. (uky.edu)
  • The Department of Physics and Astronomy would prefer that recommenders fill out an upload their letter of recommendation which can be found at https://pa.as.uky.edu/sites/default/files/Letter%20of%20Recommendation.pdf . (uky.edu)
  • Physics is one of the oldest academic disciplines, perhaps the oldest through its inclusion of astronomy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nobel prize i
  • Four NIST researchers have won a Nobel Prize in Physics for their work while at NIST: Bill Phillips (1997), Eric Cornell (2001), Jan Hall (2005) and Dave Wineland (2012). (nist.gov)
  • Aristotelian
  • Islamic scholarship had inherited Aristotelian physics from the Greeks and during the Islamic Golden Age developed it further, especially placing emphasis on observation and a priori reasoning, developing early forms of the scientific method. (wikipedia.org)
  • He elaborated an interpretation of probability theory as generalized Aristotelian logic, a view linking fundamental physics with digital computers, because these are designed to implement the operations of classical logic and, equivalently, of Boolean algebra. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aristotelian physics is a form of natural science described in the works of the Greek philosopher Aristotle (384-322 BCE). (wikipedia.org)
  • In claiming novelty for their doctrines, those natural philosophers who developed the "new science" of the seventeenth century frequently contrasted "Aristotelian" physics with their own. (wikipedia.org)
  • particle
  • Following Jaynes and Weizsäcker, the physicist John Archibald Wheeler proposed an "it from bit" doctrine: information sits at the core of physics, and every "it", whether a particle or field, derives its existence from observations. (wikipedia.org)
  • In quantum mechanics and particle physics, spin is an intrinsic form of angular momentum carried by elementary particles, composite particles (hadrons), and atomic nuclei. (wikipedia.org)
  • In particle physics, two particles are coupled if they are connected by one of the four fundamental forces. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aristotle
  • To Aristotle, "physics" was a broad field that included subjects such as the philosophy of mind, sensory experience, memory, anatomy and biology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aristotle, Physics VIII.1 While consistent with common human experience, Aristotle's principles were not based on controlled, quantitative experiments, so, while they account for many broad features of nature, they do not describe our universe in the precise, quantitative way now expected of science. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yet in his Physics Aristotle characterizes physics or the "science of nature" as pertaining to magnitudes (megethê), motion (or "process" or "gradual change" - kinêsis), and time (chronon) (Phys III.4 202b30-1). (wikipedia.org)
  • Indeed, the Physics is largely concerned with an analysis of motion, particularly local motion, and the other concepts that Aristotle believes are requisite to that analysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1986
  • In a 1986 eulogy to the mathematician, Hermann Weyl, Wheeler proclaimed: "Time, among all concepts in the world of physics, puts up the greatest resistance to being dethroned from ideal continuum to the world of the discrete, of information, of bits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Mathematics
  • Over the last two millennia, physics was a part of natural philosophy along with chemistry, biology, and certain branches of mathematics, but during the scientific revolution in the 17th century, the natural sciences emerged as unique research programs in their own right. (wikipedia.org)
  • Physics of the former sort, so they claimed, emphasized the qualitative at the expense of the quantitative, neglected mathematics and its proper role in physics (particularly in the analysis of local motion), and relied on such suspect explanatory principles as final causes and "occult" essences. (wikipedia.org)
  • Biology
  • Its applications include many problems in the fields of physics, biology , chemistry , neurology , and even some social sciences, such as sociology . (wikipedia.org)
  • research
  • COMP works in partnership with national and provincial stakeholders to share knowledge, develop guidelines and conduct research related to physics in medicine. (comp-ocpm.ca)
  • Physics research at NIST includes everything from improving the safety of medical radiation procedures to developing future 'quantum information' technologies that generate unbreakable codes. (nist.gov)
  • Although some problems in statistical physics can be solved analytically using approximations and expansions, most current research utilizes the large processing power of modern computers to simulate or approximate solutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • SoPh is the principal journal for the publication of original research on the Sun, and also reviews all aspects of solar physics. (springer.com)
  • The Ph.D. degree is a research degree granted on the basis of broad knowledge of physics and in-depth research in a specific area leading to a dissertation (and generally publications in appropriate refereed journals). (uky.edu)
  • The toughest nut to crack in Wheeler's research program of a digital dissolution of physical being in a unified physics, Wheeler says, is time. (wikipedia.org)
  • physicists
  • Physicists F.A.M. Frescura and Basil Hiley have summarized the reasons for the introduction of the principle of complementarity in physics as follows: "In the traditional view, it is assumed that there exists a reality in space-time and that this reality is a given thing, all of whose aspects can be viewed or articulated at any given moment. (wikipedia.org)
  • work
  • If it doesn't work, it's physics! (neatoshop.com)
  • This work on digital physics also led to limit-computable generalizations of algorithmic information or Kolmogorov complexity and the concept of Super Omegas, which are limit-computable numbers that are even more random (in a certain sense) than Gregory Chaitin's number of wisdom Omega. (wikipedia.org)
  • In physics, power is the rate of doing work, the amount of energy transferred per unit time. (wikipedia.org)
  • physical
  • By translation invariance, one means independence of (absolute) position, especially when referring to a law of physics, or to the evolution of a physical system. (wikipedia.org)
  • In physics, a field is a physical quantity, represented by a number or tensor, that has a value for each point in space and time. (wikipedia.org)
  • Greek
  • Physics (from Ancient Greek: φυσική (ἐπιστήμη), translit. (wikipedia.org)
  • As is expressed in the first few paragraphs of Physics, they were interested in discovering the principles, or elements of the knowledge, which was an entirely new goal in Greek education. (wikipedia.org)
  • disciplines
  • For Bohr, this was an indication that the principle of complementarity, a principle that he had previously known to appear extensively in other intellectual disciplines but which did not appear in classical physics, should be adopted as a universal principle. (wikipedia.org)
  • field
  • COMP publishes scientific and technical information related to the field of medical physics and serves as an expert resource working in partnership with other organizations. (comp-ocpm.ca)
  • A uniform electric field (which has the same strength and the same direction at each point) would be compatible with homogeneity (all points experience the same physics). (wikipedia.org)
  • This did not change the physics in any way: it did not matter if all the gravitational forces on an object were calculated individually and then added together, or if all the contributions were first added together as a gravitational field and then applied to an object. (wikipedia.org)
  • In physics, and especially quantum chaos, a wavefunction scar is an enhancement (i.e. increased norm squared) of an eigenfunction along unstable classical periodic orbits in classically chaotic systems .They were discovered and explained in 1984 by E.J. Heller and are part of the large field of quantum chaos. (wikipedia.org)
  • English
  • It is an English translation of the Russian journal of physics, Uspekhi Fizicheskikh Nauk (Russian: Успехи физических наук) which was established in 1918. (wikipedia.org)
  • The English version has existed since 1958, first under the name Soviet Physics Uspekhi and after 1993 as Physics-Uspekhi. (wikipedia.org)
  • Science
  • The journal is abstracted and indexed in: Science Citation Index Current Contents Inspec Physics Abstracts Chemical Abstracts Scopus Chemical Abstracts Service Compendex INIS Atomindex NASA Astrophysics Data System According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2014 impact factor of 2.606. (wikipedia.org)
  • journal
  • The journal Solar Physics publishes one or two Topical Collections (TCs) per year dedicated to a focused topic, frequently with a small number of survey articles introducing regular unsolicited articles, all of which benefit from appearing in a collection. (springer.com)
  • time
  • radar, lidar, and SODAR are examples of active remote sensing techniques used in atmospheric physics where the time delay between emission and return is measured, establishing the location, height, speed and direction of an object. (wikipedia.org)
  • Loop quantum gravity could lend support to digital physics, in that it assumes space-time is quantized. (wikipedia.org)
  • students
  • The M.S. program can include an emphasis on basic or applied physics or physics education, and students are encouraged to take courses in related programs that satisfy the appropriate academic objectives. (uky.edu)
  • Lead
  • A study of the strong coupling of different exciton species in two-dimensional molybdenum diselenide in a cavity uncovers the rich many-body physics and may lead to new devices. (nature.com)
  • objects
  • Physicist Carl Friedrich von Weizsäcker's theory of ur-alternatives (theory of archetypal objects), first publicized in his book The Unity of Nature (1971), further developed through the 1990s, is a kind of digital physics as it axiomatically constructs quantum physics from the distinction between empirically observable, binary alternatives. (wikipedia.org)
  • In physics, two objects are said to be coupled when they are interacting with each other. (wikipedia.org)
  • wave
  • In physics , two wave sources are perfectly coherent if they have a constant phase difference and the same frequency , and the same waveform . (wikipedia.org)