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  • Focal Press
  • Focal Encyclopedia of Photography, Frederick Purves (editor), London: Focal Press Ltd., 1956, which stated as follows: "BULB EXPOSURE (B). Another term for a brief exposure-in which the shutter remains open only so long as the shutter release is held down. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1920s
  • Time-lapse photography was further pioneered in the 1920s via a series of feature films called Bergfilme ( Mountain films ) by Arnold Fanck , including Das Wolkenphänomen in Maloja (1924) and The Holy Mountain (1926). (wikipedia.org)
  • On through the 1920s, flash photography normally meant a professional photographer sprinkling powder into the trough of a T-shaped flash lamp, holding it aloft, then triggering a brief and (usually) harmless bit of pyrotechnics. (wikipedia.org)
  • macro
  • Apart from technical photography and film-based processes, where the size of the image on the negative or image sensor is the subject of discussion, the finished print or on-screen image more commonly lends a photograph its macro status. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to advances in sensor technology, today's small-sensor digital cameras can rival the macro capabilities of a DSLR with a "true" macro lens, despite having a lower reproduction ratio, making macro photography more widely accessible at a lower cost. (wikipedia.org)
  • Macro" lenses specifically designed for close-up work, with a long barrel for close focusing and optimized for high reproduction ratios, are one of the most common tools for macro photography. (wikipedia.org)
  • Most modern macro lenses can focus continuously to infinity as well and can provide excellent optical quality for normal photography. (wikipedia.org)
  • True macro lenses, such as the Canon MP-E 65 mm f /2.8 or Minolta AF 3x-1x 1.7-2.8 Macro, can achieve higher magnification than life size, enabling photography of the structure of small insect eyes, snowflakes, and other minuscule objects. (wikipedia.org)
  • Extending the distance between the lens and the film or sensor, by inserting either extension tubes or a continuously adjustable bellows , is another equipment option for macro photography. (wikipedia.org)
  • bellows
  • In photography, a bellows is the accordion-like, pleated expandable part of a camera, usually a large or medium format camera, to allow the lens to be moved with respect to the focal plane for focusing. (wikipedia.org)
  • unlike
  • Travel photography, unlike other genres like fashion, product, or food photography, is still an underestimated and relatively less monetized genre, though the challenges faced by travel photographers are lot greater than some of the genres where the light and other shooting conditions may be controllable. (wikipedia.org)
  • exhibition
  • Many of the photographers and artists represented in this volume were first shown at MoMA in a New Photography exhibition, which also provided the occasion for their first works to be acquired by the Museum. (moma.org)
  • technique
  • Orton imagery, also called an Orton slide sandwich or the Orton Effect, is a photography technique which blends two completely different photos of the same scene, resulting in a distinctive mix of high and low detail areas within the same photo. (wikipedia.org)
  • notable
  • Through the 1880s into the early 20th century spirit photography remained popular, with notable proponents such as Arthur Conan Doyle and William Crookes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Early
  • Much of today's Travel Photography style is derived from early work in Magazines such as National Geographic magazine from photographers such as Steve McCurry. (wikipedia.org)
  • Shutters in front of the lens, sometimes simply a lens cap that is removed and replaced for the long exposures required, were used in the early days of photography. (wikipedia.org)
  • During the early-to-mid-20th century, architectural photography became more creative as photographers used diagonal lines and bold shadows in their compositions, and experimented with other techniques. (wikipedia.org)
  • By the early 1950s, architects were hiring more photographers for commissioned work, resulting in architectural photography being viewed as more of an art form. (wikipedia.org)
  • Originating as early as 1904, the term was used by critic Sadakichi Hartmann in the magazine Camera Work, and later promoted by its editor, Alfred Stieglitz, as a more pure form of photography than Pictorialism. (wikipedia.org)
  • mostly
  • Ott's initial "day-job" career was that of a banker, with time-lapse movie photography, mostly of plants, initially just a hobby. (wikipedia.org)
  • techniques
  • The techniques used in each of these types of photography are similar, but do have some difference and sometimes require different equipment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Way beyond monochrome: advanced techniques for traditional black & white photography (2nd ed. (wikipedia.org)
  • The magazine focused on photography and contained articles on cameras, techniques, locations, digital imaging and lighting. (wikipedia.org)
  • landscape
  • Many travel photographers specialise in a particular aspect of photography such as travel portraits, landscape or documentary photography as well as shooting all aspects of travel. (wikipedia.org)
  • In a similar fashion to landscape photography, a deep depth of field is usually employed so that both the foreground and background (to infinity) are in sharp focus. (wikipedia.org)
  • produce
  • Photographers like Steve McCurry are often commissioned to shoot commercial advertising work using their skills from travel and documentary photography to produce powerful advertising images. (wikipedia.org)
  • contemporary
  • In the 1980s, as more and more institutions and galleries became as interested in photography as they were in what was beginning to be referred to as "contemporary art," the main channel for contemporary photography at MoMA was the New Photography exhibitions, made up primarily of noncollection works. (moma.org)
  • Szarkowski hoped thus to place contemporary creation at the center of the department's programming: "New Photography will occupy twice the space of our former one-man series, and will show three or four photographers whose work-individually and collectively-seems to represent the most interesting achievements of new photography. (moma.org)
  • It has been a window on the Museum's approach to photography, and it continues to be one of the very few regularly occurring contemporary series at the Museum. (moma.org)
  • usually
  • In photography, a negative is an image, usually on a strip or sheet of transparent plastic film, in which the lightest areas of the photographed subject appear darkest and the darkest areas appear lightest. (wikipedia.org)
  • film
  • In a similar manner, film can also be played at a much lower rate than it was captured at, slowing down fast action, as slow motion or high-speed photography . (wikipedia.org)
  • The use of photography in this form to obtain the preservation of natural resources was a first and followed his use of film to make the first recorded nature movie, shown to tourists in Yosemite in the spring of 1909. (wikipedia.org)
  • magazine
  • Popular Photography, formerly known as Popular Photography & Imaging, also called Pop Photo, was a monthly American consumer magazine that at one time had the largest circulation of any imaging magazine, with an editorial staff twice the size of its nearest competitor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Photography Monthly was a monthly magazine published in the United Kingdom by Archant. (wikipedia.org)
  • means
  • William Stainton Moses, another spiritualist, claimed that spirit photography operated by means of a fluid substance called ectoplasm, in which the spirits take form. (wikipedia.org)
  • popular
  • Concert photography began becoming popular with the advent of Rock & Roll, particularly during the height of popularity by such bands as The Beatles or the Rolling Stones. (wikipedia.org)