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  • People
  • Why you are attracted to certain people have a lot to do with the human pheromones that exist in just about every living think on the planet. (popcornantitheater.com)
  • Discussions on human pheromones continue to this day as more and more people become interested in what they are capable of doing. (popcornantitheater.com)
  • People are generally interested in Pheromones advantage in humans. (minnesotaband.com)
  • She is accusing you nonsensically only to incite some kind of response that determines your true character and your genuine level of pheromone confidence (not the confidence you WANT people to think you have). (ccpsoftball.net)
  • Many people have been convinced that the greater the cost of the product, the greater the amount of human pheromones included and the more effective it will be. (gipiproject.org)
  • According to Doty, those critical of the book range from people who refuse to read it to those who have semantic issues with the pheromone concept and its applicability to mammals. (wikipedia.org)
  • male
  • For example, the Vandenbergh effect in mice occurs when puberty -accelerating pheromones are released in the urine of male mice. (wikipedia.org)
  • individuals
  • Unfortunately, not much research has been conducted on this item and only those individuals who take a strong interest in pheromones would seek out the true information on the item. (gipiproject.org)
  • rather
  • Rather than trying to "logically reason" and saying something like, "No I don't say that to all the girls - just you" or standing silent without pheromones. (ccpsoftball.net)
  • behaviors
  • While there have been several experiments examining the effects of compounds extracted from people's armpits, much of the data on sex-related behaviors, The Scientist has found, go back more than a decade and were met then-and still now-with skepticism from pheromone researchers. (the-scientist.com)
  • All three papers reported that individuals who received the pheromone formulation reported increased frequencies of sexual behaviors, including kissing, formal dates, and sexual intercourse. (the-scientist.com)
  • While humans are highly dependent upon visual cues, when in close proximity, smells also play a role in sociosexual behaviors. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, sex pheromones are particularly associated with signaling mating behaviors or dominance. (wikipedia.org)
  • They proposed the term to describe chemical signals from conspecifics that elicit innate behaviors soon after the German biochemist Adolf Butenandt had characterized the first such chemical, bombykol, a chemically well-characterized pheromone released by the female silkworm to attract mates. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, they do use them to determine the local population density of similar organisms and control behaviors that take more time to execute (e.g. pheromones are used in quorum sensing or to promote natural competence for transformation, i.e. sexual gene transfer). (wikipedia.org)
  • In the context of human evolution, human vestigiality involves those traits (such as organs or behaviors) occurring in humans that have lost all or most of their original function through evolution. (wikipedia.org)
  • To distinguish pheromones from other substances that can stimulate behaviors such as the scents of flowers or food odors, they emphasize that pheromones are "special messenger substances" such as sexual attractants in butterflies and moths. (wikipedia.org)
  • species
  • It has been long understood that nearly every species in the animal kingdom produce and sense pheromones, including humans. (pheromoneadvantage.com)
  • Sex pheromones specifically focus on indicating females for breeding, attracting the opposite sex, and conveying information on species, age, sex and genotype. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sex pheromones have evolved in many species. (wikipedia.org)
  • In most species, pheromones are released by the non-limiting sex. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is likely that most externally fertilizing species (e.g. marine worms, sea urchins) coordinate their sexual behaviour (release of sperm and eggs) using pheromones. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, the Eastern spruce budworm Choristoneura fumiferana female pheromones contain a 95:5 mix of E- and Z 11-tetradecenal aldehydes, while the sex pheromones of other species of spruce budworm contain acetates and alcohols. (wikipedia.org)
  • For control, much larger quantities of a sex pheromone are released to disrupt the mating of a pest species. (wikipedia.org)
  • A pheromone (from Greek phero "to bear" + hormone from Greek - "impetus") is a secreted or excreted chemical factor that triggers a social response in members of the same species. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sometimes species produce the sex pheromones of the organisms they exploit as prey or pollinators (such as bolas spiders and some orchids). (wikipedia.org)
  • There are two main types of sweat glands that differ in their structure, function, secretory product, mechanism of excretion, anatomic distribution, and distribution across species: Eccrine sweat glands are distributed almost all over the human body, in varying densities, with the highest density in palms and soles, then on the head, but much less on the trunk and the extremities. (wikipedia.org)
  • Moreover, the number of gains and losses can be enormous even if two extant species possess the same gene number (for example, humans and macaques). (wikipedia.org)
  • Thomas argues that the communication of results in science puts humans in the same model as these other species. (wikipedia.org)
  • In modern humans, the vermiform appendix is a vestige of a redundant organ that in ancestral species had digestive functions, much as it still does in extant species in which intestinal flora hydrolyze cellulose and similar indigestible plant materials. (wikipedia.org)
  • molecules
  • While pheromones are well-defined among other members of the animal kingdom, the presence of such molecules in humans remains controversial. (the-scientist.com)
  • Scientists have identified the first human gene that may be linked to pheromones, the odorless molecules that in other animals trigger primal urges including sex, defense and kinship. (nytimes.com)
  • PRNewswire-FirstCall
  • SAN JOSE, Calif., March 27 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Human Pheromone Sciences, Inc. ("HPS" or "the Company") today announced results for the three months and the year ended December 31, 2008. (biospace.com)
  • SAN JOSE, Calif., Nov. 13 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/ -- Human Pheromone Sciences, Inc. (OTC Bulletin Board: EROX) ("HPS" or "the Company") today announced results for the third quarter and nine months ended September 30, 2008. (bio-medicine.org)
  • ovulation
  • You are able to in this regard buy human pheromones in the form of real copulin, which is the compound secreted by women during ovulation. (mystopgap.com)
  • Other scientists dispute this with evidence from experiments that human pheromones have a powerful effect on other humans and can change the ovulation cycle of women and perceived attractiveness of potential mates. (dopheromoneswork.info)
  • opposite sex
  • S earch for "pheromones products" on the internet, and dozens of sprays and perfume additives will appear-many claiming to be able to increase your attractiveness to the opposite sex. (the-scientist.com)
  • Human pheromones to attract a mate is quite a popular amplification feature that men and women use when they go out in public to successfully attract the opposite sex, or whomever the desire. (hubpages.com)
  • Quite a nice experience, none the less.If you are ready to make an impression on the opposite sex with the alluring aroma that resonates from your body, then the use of human pheromones will assist you with your endeavors, to do so successfully. (hubpages.com)
  • According to human pheromone expert, Dr. Virgil Amend, dating and mating is highly influenced by pheromones, powerful air-borne chemical hormones produced by the body that fill the air around us to attract the opposite sex. (pheromoneadvantage.com)
  • Does that mean that when humans smell pheromones, we act like love-crazed tom-cats ready to pounce on any member of the opposite sex that happens to be nearby? (blogspot.com)
  • Sex pheromones are pheromones released by an organism to attract an individual of the opposite sex, encourage them to mate with them, or perform some other function closely related with sexual reproduction. (wikipedia.org)
  • odors
  • The activity change during puberty suggest that humans communicate through odors. (wikipedia.org)
  • For more than four decades, his research has focused upon the nature, origin and functional significance of human odors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dr. Preti's laboratory has identified characteristic underarm odorants, and his current studies center upon a bioassay-guided approach to the identification of human pheromones, odors diagnostic of human disease, human malodor identification and suppression and examining the "odor-print" of humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • researchers
  • In animals, researchers have documented the complex neurological paths pheromones trace to stimulate parts of the brain that are deeply rooted in instinct. (nytimes.com)
  • Brennan concludes: "I suspect that the majority of researchers will continue to use the term [pheromone], despite all of its shortcomings. (wikipedia.org)
  • organism
  • There are physical limits on the practical size of organisms employing pheromones, because at small sizes pheromone diffuses away from the source organism faster than it can be produced, and a sensible concentration accumulates too slowly to be useful. (wikipedia.org)
  • urine
  • hang around its entrance for days, enticing him with her intoxicating scent - pheromones in her urine, according to Jelle Atema, a biologist with the Boston University Marine Program, who studies lobsters in his laboratory at the Marine Biological Laboratory at Woods Hole, Mass. (naturalattraction.com)
  • For example, the Vandenbergh effect in mice occurs when puberty-accelerating pheromones are released in the urine of male mice. (wikipedia.org)
  • aggregation
  • Males can sometimes attract other males instead, the sex pheromone acting as an aggregation pheromone. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aggregation pheromones function in mate selection, overcoming host resistance by mass attack, and defense against predators. (wikipedia.org)
  • In recent decades, the importance of applying aggregation pheromones in the management of the boll weevil (Anthonomus grandis), stored product weevils (Sitophilus zeamais), Sitophilus granarius, Sitophilus oryzae, and pea and bean weevil (Sitona lineatus) has been demonstrated. (wikipedia.org)
  • Aggregation pheromones are among the most ecologically selective pest suppression methods. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1986
  • They claim, on their web site and in this ad, that she "Co-discovered human pheromones in 1986" and use this to I guess imply that whatever potions they sell must therefore work the way they claim. (blogspot.com)
  • odor
  • While many pheromones have distinct smells, you may be influenced by a small amount of a pheromone that does not create a conscious odor. (hubpages.com)
  • When buying pheromones keep in mind that you ought to choose the strongest awareness and buy a product that accompany a money back guarantee in the event you do not like the odor or perhaps ensuing effects. (mystopgap.com)
  • Their apocrine glands, like those in humans, produce an odorless oily milky secretion evolved not to evaporate and cool but rather coat and stick to hair so odor-causing bacteria can grow on it. (wikipedia.org)
  • formulas
  • When asked about her pheromone formulas, Cutler says that her products were carefully selected from human underarm extracts, "based on my analysis of a world of literature that I do not let my competitors know about. (the-scientist.com)
  • The two Pheromone Advantage formulas, one for men and one for women, blend the most powerful pheromones appropriate to activate the VNO organ in each of the sexes, and each formula is concentrated to insure best results. (pheromoneadvantage.com)
  • cues
  • Rodents and other creatures essentially are reactive animals that depend on pheromones for behavioral cues. (nytimes.com)
  • Humans use their larger brains to rely more on judgment and complex sensory cues, like vision. (nytimes.com)
  • receptors
  • A very significant part of the human genome - about 1,500 genes of our 30,000 human genes - is used to code the receptors of smell. (hubpages.com)
  • The receptor neurons possess apical microvilli, to which are localized the sensory receptors, G-protein-coupled receptors which are often referred to as pheromone receptors since vomeronasal receptors have been tied to detecting pheromones. (wikipedia.org)
  • Lancelets, a class of fish-like marine chordates, are the most distantly related ancestors that share the same olfactory receptors (OR) with humans. (wikipedia.org)
  • Pherlure
  • Even though I'm completely impressed with my results with Pherlure, the big question is how it compares to the leading pheromone brands. (niceboard.com)
  • To see how Pherlure stacks up to the other leading pheromones, check out my complete Pheromone Reviewsand start getting laid. (niceboard.com)
  • Here are some of the top products: Pherlure: Uses a pheromone that is university proven to work and the result is one of the most popular and customer satisfied products on the market. (pheromone-colognes.info)
  • silkworm
  • The first to be described chemically was bombykol, the silkworm moth's sex pheromone, which is a complex alcohol, (E,Z)-10,12-hexadecadienol, discovered in 1959. (wikipedia.org)
  • German Biochemist Adolf Butenandt characterized the first such chemical, Bombykol (a chemically well-characterized pheromone released by the female silkworm to attract mates). (wikipedia.org)
  • behavioral
  • Studies of brain EEG patterns of behavioral evidence have also come to the same conclusion: that we can be strongly affected by pheromones that we are not even conscious of smelling. (hubpages.com)
  • The examples of human vestigiality are numerous, including the anatomical (such as the human tailbone, wisdom teeth, and inside corner of the eye), the behavioral (goose bumps and palmar grasp reflex), and molecular (pseudogenes). (wikipedia.org)
  • synthetic
  • Of course, only synthetic pheromones manufactured in a laboratory that meets ASTM and ISO standards can be trusted to possess just the right level of concentration for social settings. (articleinsider.com)
  • Companies are working on products that contain synthetic insect pheromones that will disrupt the breeding patterns of insect pests. (niceboard.com)
  • Karlson
  • The term "pheromone" was introduced by Peter Karlson and Martin Lüscher in 1959, based on the Greek word pherein (to transport) and hormone (to stimulate). (wikipedia.org)
  • Doty argues that the concept of pheromone introduced by Karlson and Lüscher is too simple for mammalian chemonsensory systems, failing to take into account learning and the context-dependence of chemosensation. (wikipedia.org)
  • sweat
  • After all, pheromones are naturally secreted via sweat glands and there is no proven way to control the levels of pheromones we secrete. (articleinsider.com)
  • They are not significant for cooling in humans, but are the sole effective sweat glands in hoofed animals, such as the camels, donkeys, horses, and cattle. (wikipedia.org)
  • For example, androstenedione is a steroid hormone that is found in human sweat and is the main ingredient in commercially sold human pheromone products, but scientific research provides little evidence that it functions as a pheromone. (wikipedia.org)