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  • questionnaire
  • This procedure of factor analyzing common adjectives was later utilized by Raymond Cattell (7th most highly cited psychologist of the 20th Century-based on the peer-reviewed journal literature), who subsequently utilized a data set of over 4000 affect terms from the English dictionary that eventually resulted in construction of the Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF) which also measured up to eight second-stratum personality factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • situations
  • 1. Republic of the Philippines Southern Luzon State University GRADUATE SCHOOL Lucban, Quezon Survey QuestionnairePart I. PERSONALITY INVENTORY Below are listed eleven different situations and areas which confront all of us atone time or another. (slideshare.net)
  • Ryckman defines personality as a "Dynamic and organized set of characteristics that each person possesses, which uniquely influences their behaviors, motivations and cognitions in varying situations. (medicalnewstoday.com)
  • In noticing the strong inconsistencies in how people behaved across situations, some psychologists dismissed personality as nonexistent. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some work suggests that people can espouse different levels of a personality dimension as the social situations and time of day change Therefore, someone is not conscientious all the time, but can be conscientious at work and a lot less so when she is home. (wikipedia.org)
  • A personality clash may occur in work-related, family-related, or social situations. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, in order to avoid recognizing harsher business bullying situations, employers are more likely to refer to these actions as a personality clash. (wikipedia.org)
  • In this way, many people who maintain an addictive personality isolate themselves from social situations in order to mask their addiction. (wikipedia.org)
  • trait
  • Flexibility is a personality trait - the extent to which a person can cope with changes in circumstances and think about problem and tasks in novel, creative ways. (wikipedia.org)
  • Personality, one's characteristic way of feeling, behaving and thinking, is often conceptualized as a person's standing on each Big Five personality trait (extraversion, neuroticism, openness to experience, agreeableness and conscientiousness). (wikipedia.org)
  • One exception however, was the Objective-Analytic Test Battery, a performance test designed to quantitatively measure 10 factor-analytically discerned personality trait dimensions. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, the Big Five and related Five Factor Model have been challenged for accounting for less than two-thirds of the known trait variance in the normal personality sphere alone. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2000
  • Attempts to construct actual performance tests of personality have been very limited even though Raymond Cattell with his colleague Frank Warburton compiled a list of over separate 2000 objective test that could be used in constructing objective personality tests. (wikipedia.org)
  • individuals
  • The notion of Old Testament corporate personality encompasses four things: identification Individuals are never considered to be isolated from the groups that they belong to, and are often treated as representatives for, or even as wholly identified with, those groups. (wikipedia.org)
  • It has long been believed that personality development is shaped by life experiences that intensify the propensities that led individuals to those experiences in the first place, which is known as the corresponsive principle. (wikipedia.org)
  • Characteristics
  • Their new methods of personality assessment describe fluctuations in personality characteristics as consistent and predictable for each person based on the environment he is in and his predispositions. (wikipedia.org)
  • The self-report inventory involves administration of many items requiring respondents to introspectively assess their own personality characteristics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Sigmund Freud
  • In his psychoanalytic interpretation, Sigmund Freud asserted that the human mind could be divided into three significant components-the id, the ego, and the superego-which work together (or come into conflict) to shape personality. (infoplease.com)
  • Sigmund Freud and Carl Rogers theorised that people have a 'hidden' personality of which they are not aware. (wikipedia.org)
  • behaviors
  • Personality is defined as the set of habitual behaviors, cognitions and emotional patterns that evolve from biological and environmental factors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hence, personality disorders are defined by experiences and behaviors that differ from societal norms and expectations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Personality also refers to the pattern of thoughts, feelings, social adjustments, and behaviors consistently exhibited over time that strongly influences one's expectations, self-perceptions, values, and attitudes. (wikipedia.org)
  • describe
  • In the past, the term "disc jockey" (or "DJ") was exclusively used to describe on-air radio personalities who played recorded music and hosted radio shows that featured popular music. (wikipedia.org)
  • approaches
  • Abraham Maslow and Carl Rogers supported a humanistic approach to personality, pointing out that other approaches do not factor in people's basic goodness and the motivational factors that push them toward higher levels of functioning. (infoplease.com)
  • Researchers offering biological approaches to personality have focused on the action of specific genes and neurotransmitters as determinants. (infoplease.com)
  • On the other hand, more behaviorally based approaches define personality through learning and habits. (wikipedia.org)
  • Personality clashes occur when two (or more) people find themselves in conflict not over a particular issue or incident, but due to a fundamental incompatibility in their personalities, their approaches to things, their style of life. (wikipedia.org)
  • people
  • Earlier people thought that environment and early experiences that prevents the advancement and development of adaptive patterns in a person resulted in personality disorders. (medindia.net)
  • The goals associated with them elicit the appropriation of certain personality profiles by the people enacting them. (wikipedia.org)
  • Personality also predicts human reactions to other people, problems, and stress. (wikipedia.org)
  • The study of personality is based on the essential insight that all people are similar in some ways, yet different in others. (wikipedia.org)
  • People with addictions and addictive personalities tend to have an external locus of control, and they also have an increased tendency towards field dependence. (wikipedia.org)
  • At the same time, people with this type of personality tend to believe that they do not fit into societal norms and therefore, acting on impulses, deviate from conformity to rebel. (wikipedia.org)
  • People with addictive personalities are very sensitive to emotional stress. (wikipedia.org)
  • appropriation
  • An action for the appropriation of personality can only succeed where the defendant intended to commit the wrong (but British Columbia has no "intention" requirement). (wikipedia.org)
  • sustain
  • In order to sustain their relationships, the narcissistic personality will be controlling, manipulative, and blame others in their primary relationships frequently for petty problems. (angelfire.com)
  • social
  • Psychoanalysis emphasizes unconscious motivations and the conflicts between primal urges and learned social mores, stressing the importance of early childhood experiences in determining mature personality. (infoplease.com)
  • citation needed] In addition, social roles (e.g. employee) have been identified as a potential sources of personality change. (wikipedia.org)
  • Longitudinal research demonstrates that people's personality trajectories can often be explained by the social roles they espoused and relinquished throughout their life stages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Thus social roles are often studied as fundamental predictors of personality. (wikipedia.org)
  • Masking is a process in which an individual changes or "masks" their natural personality to conform to social pressures, abuse, and/or harassment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Personality disorders are characterized by an enduring collection of behavioral patterns often associated with considerable personal, social, and occupational disruption. (wikipedia.org)
  • They argue that the theory and diagnosis of personality disorders are based strictly on social, or even sociopolitical and economic considerations. (wikipedia.org)
  • Talk radio - Talk radio personalities often discuss social and political issues from a particular political point of view. (wikipedia.org)
  • patterns
  • Alan R. Lang of Florida State University, author of an addiction study prepared for the United States National Academy of Sciences, said, "If we can better identify the personality factors, they can help us devise better treatment and can open up new strategies to intervene and break the patterns of addiction. (wikipedia.org)
  • tend
  • Personologists now tend to agree that people's personalities are variegated and are not to be conceptualized through bipolar characterizations (e.g. extraversion vs introversion). (wikipedia.org)