• atrial
  • An atrial isolator comprising two tubular members, two lumens, drainage ports, and expandable occluders. (google.com)
  • Methods of using such an atrial isolator are also disclosed, particularly to provide circulatory isolation of the heart and coronary blood vessels, and cardioplegia delivery. (google.com)
  • The present invention relates generally to devices and methods for performing venous drainage and providing cardiac arrest in cardiac bypass surgery by using an atrial isolator which drains the inferior vena cava and superior vena cava for cardiopulmonary bypass and delivers cardioplegia. (google.com)
  • AtriCure Announces Initiation of the ABLATE Pivotal Trial to Evaluate the Isolator Synergy(TM) Bipolar Ablation System to Treat Atrial Fi. (bio-medicine.org)
  • The purpose of the ABLATE clinical trial is to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of AtriCure's Isolator Synergy(TM) bipolar ablation system for reestablishing normal heart rhythm in patients with permanent atrial fibrillation, or AF, requiring concomitant open-heart surgery utilizing the Cox Maze IV procedure. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Medical journals have described the adoption by leading cardiothoracic surgeons of the AtriCure Isolator(R) bipolar ablation system as a treatment alternative during open-heart surgical procedures to create lesions in cardiac tissue to block the abnormal electrical impulses that cause atrial fibrillation, or AF, a rapid, irregular quivering of the upper chambers of the heart. (bio-medicine.org)
  • contamination
  • Equipment used to prevent contamination of and by patients, especially those with bacterial infections. (bireme.br)
  • The isolator design is the more dependable of the two barrier design choices, as it prevents contamination hazards by achieving a more comprehensive separation of the processing environment from the surrounding facility. (wikipedia.org)
  • Nonetheless, both Isolator and RABS designs are contemporary approaches developed over the last 35 years and a great advancement over designs of the 1950s-70s that were far more prone to microbial contamination problems. (wikipedia.org)
  • This ensures that the environment is maintained as contamination-free to safeguard patients who will later be administered the drug. (wikipedia.org)
  • There are two major types of isolators: Closed Isolator operation "Closed isolator" systems exclude external contamination from the isolator's interior by accomplishing material transfer via aseptic connection to auxiliary equipment, rather than use of openings to the surrounding environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Openings are engineered (i.e., using continuous overpressure) to exclude external contamination from entering the isolator chamber. (wikipedia.org)
  • The "negative pressure isolator," and has become less common and desirable, but is superior to the traditional biosafety cabinet which is vulnerable to contamination and can expose the worker to toxicological hazards if not operated properly. (wikipedia.org)
  • Radiopharmaceuticals are generally not designed to have a therapeutic effect themselves, but there is a risk to staff from radiation exposure and to patients from possible contamination in production. (wikipedia.org)
  • sterile
  • Barrier and Isolator designs are used throughout the industries, from sterile injectable drug filling to cytotoxic sterile drug compounding to electronics manufacturing to orange juice filling. (wikipedia.org)
  • If a negative isolator is used, its intricate design must fulfill two objectives: protect workers outside of the isolator, and assure sterility of sterile drugs inside the isolator. (wikipedia.org)
  • As such, the term "negative pressure" isolator is somewhat of a misnomer, as contaminated ("polluted") room air must not be pulled into the main workstation isolator in a sterile operation. (wikipedia.org)
  • The main workstation isolator, in which the sterile product is exposed, is therefore protected from contaminated air as the toxic product should be exhausted via the buffer zone before it reaches operators working outside of the isolation. (wikipedia.org)
  • In addition to Isolators, there are also extensive barriers that provide sub-isolation protection, but have a very good track record of reducing hazards to sterile drugs during processing when they are designed and operated properly. (wikipedia.org)
  • These procedures are usually carried out in a clean room or isolator to provide radiation shielding and sterile conditions. (wikipedia.org)
  • notably
  • These would include patients with an unknown disease pending identification of the pathogen, patients with viral hemorrhagic fevers (notably those due to filoviruses and arenaviruses), and those suspected of being affected by a biological attack (Table 1) (3) . (cdc.gov)
  • Van Etten, its chronic care affiliate, established several new protocols for the treatment of tuberculosis patients, most notably the eventual elimination of the face masks which had heightened patients' fear and isolation, and the establishment of the first Home Care Program for tuberculosis in NYC. (wikipedia.org)
  • contingency
  • Evacuation of such patients is relevant to military contingency operations because troops may be placed at risk for hemorrhagic fevers and other infections during deployment to tropical environments or by adversaries' use of biological warfare agents. (cdc.gov)
  • therapeutic
  • As they serve no therapeutic or diagnostic purpose, network isolators themselves are not classed as medical electronic equipment according to the standard IEC 60601-1, nor do they fall within the scope of the Medical Devices Directive 93/42/EEC. (wikipedia.org)
  • Ebola
  • Originally developed to support CDC staff who might become infected while investigating avian flu and SARS in East Asia, it was never used until the 2014 Ebola virus epidemic in West Africa, transporting 36 Ebola patients out of West Africa. (wikipedia.org)
  • That changed abruptly in late-July 2014 when Phoenix Air was asked if they could support a patient with a "bloodborne pathogen" (namely Ebola virus) as well as it could an "airborne pathogen" (such as TB or flu, for which it had been designed). (wikipedia.org)
  • Physicians from Phoenix, along with CDC experts, spent a day and a half reviewing the system, after which they all agreed it was suitable for Ebola patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • To date, Phoenix Air and the ABCS have flown five Ebola patients out of West Africa (four Americans-Brantly, Writebol, Dr Rick Sacra, and an unidentified American on September 9 -- and a German doctor from Sierra Leone to Hamburg, Germany). (wikipedia.org)
  • tuberculosis
  • The CDC experienced difficulties and embarrassment relating to safe patient air-transport during an international tuberculosis scare in 2007. (wikipedia.org)
  • Living conditions there reportedly have improved vastly since 2000, however still remained bad (for example, healthy persons are kept together with tuberculosis patients) and reports of continued beatings, torture and other abuse have persisted. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hospital
  • Allowing for integration with any existing hospital information system, HCS Medication Reconciliation reduces clinician workload and increases patient safety by streamlining the medication management process. (rxinsider.com)
  • As a result, an affiliation agreement was created between the new Albert Einstein College of Medicine and the hospital campus, a mutually beneficial teaching, research, and patient care relationship which continues to this day. (wikipedia.org)
  • unit
  • Back in the 1960s, a patient isolator unit was developed for cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy. (nutritionfacts.org)
  • After the patient was delivered to the isolation unit, the members would leave the unit and enter into an anteroom with an airlock. (wikipedia.org)
  • Developed by Vickers in the U.K. in the 1970s - and manufactured in later years by Elwyn Roberts Isolators, Shropshire, UK, until 2007 - the ATI was a self-contained unit capable of transporting a patient with a highly virulent disease and at the same time providing maximum microbiological security while full nursing care and treatment are rendered. (wikipedia.org)
  • The more complete technical definition is as follows: An isolator is a decontaminated unit, supplied with Class 100 (ISO 5) or higher air quality, that provides uncompromised, continuous isolation of its interior from the external environment (e.g., surrounding cleanroom air and personnel). (wikipedia.org)
  • lethal
  • The purpose of the isolation team is to safely transport patients with potentially lethal communicable diseases for which no effective vaccines, chemoprophylaxis, or specific therapies exist. (cdc.gov)
  • A specific hazard stems from possible differences in ground potentials between network components, which when not properly isolated can result in a leakage current that can flow through the patient, which is dangerous, and potentially lethal. (wikipedia.org)
  • USAMRIID
  • The isolator could be attached directly to a transfer port, situated on the external wall of the main USAMRIID building, to allow movement of the patient into a BSL-4 medical care suite without exposing the environment to the patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • Equipment
  • An antechamber to the patient area is used by medical personnel for donning and doffing personal protective equipment as well as for decontamination. (wikipedia.org)
  • IEC 60950 Safety of Information Technology Equipment), as the patient may be unconscious, anaesthetised, or otherwise unable to move, and the need for patient protection is therefore paramount. (wikipedia.org)
  • 14 air conditioning units and isolator equipment. (wikipedia.org)
  • chemotherapy
  • In addition, the frequency of pneumonia and fever higher than 38 degrees C were examined in 34 patients with acute leukaemia who received intensive chemotherapy in SBCR or LAFR. (biomedsearch.com)
  • system
  • Because our immune system cells were often caught in the friendly fire, up to 50% of cancer patients died of infections before they could even complete the chemo because their immune systems had become so compromised. (nutritionfacts.org)
  • Network isolators are installed as part of a copper Ethernet system, as galvanic isolators. (wikipedia.org)
  • Isolators may be used as network accessories, built into medical devices, or installed within a medical network system. (wikipedia.org)
  • The IEC 60601-1 standard requires that two independent precautionary measures (Means of Patient Protection, or MOPPs) are set in place, to protect the patient from electrical shock in the medical system. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Isolator Synergy(TM) bipolar ablation system is designed to create precise lesions, or scars, on heart muscle, which block irregular electrical signals and restore normal sinus rhythm. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Upon the completion of a successful trial, the results will be submitted to the FDA as part of a Pre-Market Approval, or PMA, in support of an AF indication for our Isolator Synergy(TM) bipolar ablation system when used to treat patients undergoing concomitant open-heart surgery. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Based on our group's experience using the Isolator Synergy(TM) bipolar ablation system, we believe that the study endpoints are well designed and that the trial plan will facilitate enrollment. (bio-medicine.org)
  • Additionally, medical journals and leading cardiothoracic surgeons have described the AtriCure Isolator(R) system as a promising treatment alternative for patients who may be candidates for sole-therapy minimally invasive procedures. (bio-medicine.org)
  • facility
  • The facility uses a combination of elastomeric base isolators and hydraulic viscous dampers (similar to those used in an MX missile silo) to absorb the energy generated during a seismic event and to protect the building's structural integrity. (wikipedia.org)
  • potentially
  • Additionally, the memory of the severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic of 2003-2004 and the then-current avian influenza threat (both potentially requiring transport of sick patients back to the U.S. from the Far East) prompted CDC officials to initiate the program that became the ABCS. (wikipedia.org)
  • Due to the lack of AF treatment alternatives, it is important for AtriCure to work closely with the FDA to investigate potentially safer and more effective treatment alternatives for the millions of patients who suffer the debilitating effects of AF," said David J. Drachman, AtriCure's President and Chief Executive Officer. (bio-medicine.org)
  • continuous
  • The patient area is provided with continuous negative air pressure and air filtration to keep pathogens from entering the rest of the cabin. (wikipedia.org)
  • Open Isolator "Open Isolator" systems are designed to allow for the continuous or semi-continuous ingress and/or egress of materials during operations through one or more openings. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Network isolators are used in the medical industry to protect patients against leakage currents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Network isolators work to remove this hazard, by electrically disconnecting medical devices from a network. (wikipedia.org)
  • Networks isolators should be installed as close as possible to the medical device in question. (wikipedia.org)
  • They are often installed in the medical field in conjunction with isolation transformers, which serve to protect the patient from electrical faults. (wikipedia.org)
  • This prospective, non-randomized clinical trial is expected to enroll approximately 70 patients at 10 medical centers in the United States. (bio-medicine.org)
  • From early on, Jacobi's medical accomplishments and innovations in patient care were many. (wikipedia.org)
  • negative
  • In addition to the quiet and comfortable atmosphere, expected favourable effects of negative air ions may give higher quality of life for patients in SBCR than those in LAFR. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The interior of the isolator was maintained at a pressure negative to the external environment by a high-efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filtered blower. (wikipedia.org)
  • all case patients tested negative but had received antibiotics). (aappublications.org)
  • While the positive pressure isolator is most common, "negative" pressure devices also exist for very large industrial operations that handle toxic products. (wikipedia.org)
  • The "negative" pressure isolator does however include a separate buffer zone (an extra isolator compartment) that is designed to exhaust both incoming room air and outgoing positive pressure air from the main workstation. (wikipedia.org)
  • pharmaceutical
  • Pharmaceutical industry and pharmacy compounding isolators are used for maintaining sterility of a drug, and that is the focus of this article. (wikipedia.org)
  • Isolators are routinely found within the pharmaceutical industry and are widely used in Europe (and increasingly in the US) for pharmacy aseptic compounding applications. (wikipedia.org)
  • It generally involves the practice of combining a radionuclide tracer with a pharmaceutical component that determines the biological localization in the patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • external
  • The network isolator is therefore a passive device, and functions without any requirement of an external power supply. (wikipedia.org)
  • Isolators operate as positive-pressure devices, and use full wall separation and substantial overpressure to both physically and aerodynamically separate the interior from the external room environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • infections
  • The rationale is: there are bacteria in salads, bacteria cause infections, immunocompromised patients are at increased risk for infections, and therefore, no salad. (nutritionfacts.org)
  • problems
  • Network isolators have many other applications in overcoming the problems of differing ground potentials across networks, or between network components. (wikipedia.org)
  • major
  • Metastasis is the most common cause of death in lung cancer patients and is a major obstacle to the successful treatment. (aacrjournals.org)
  • care
  • The mission of 20Ways is to educate pharmacy managers on products and services that serve to improve patient care or to improve a pharmacy's financial bottom-line. (rxinsider.com)
  • The centre provides treatment beds for 80 general patients, and 12 health care workers, with plans for an additional 8 health care beds. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regulations may identify special cases for earthing in mines, in patient care areas, or in hazardous areas of industrial plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • drug
  • SEVA Direct Basic offers an inexpensive, safety hazardous drug transfer convenience kit designed to improve hazardous drug safety and minimize IV line connections and disconnections for your patients. (rxinsider.com)
  • pharmacy
  • Nuclear pharmacy, also known as radiopharmacy, involves preparation of radioactive materials for patient administration that will be used to diagnose and treat specific diseases in nuclear medicine. (wikipedia.org)
  • common
  • Among animal reservoirs, CoV has a large genetic diversity yet the samples from patients suggest a similar genome, and therefore common source, though the data are limited. (wikipedia.org)
  • environment
  • EasyClean 360 Isolator Cleaning Tool's unique design makes it the perfect solution for effective and efficient aseptic environment cleaning. (rxinsider.com)