• diagnosis
  • The aim of the study was to examine late diagnoses and to assess the quality of care following diagnosis. (isharonline.org)
  • METHODS: National surveillance and cohort data were used to examine late HIV diagnoses and to assess the quality of care received in the 12 months following HIV diagnosis. (isharonline.org)
  • Outcome variables included being retained in care and achieving virological suppression, 366-730 days after diagnosis. (biomedsearch.com)
  • RESULTS: Of the 1781 patients in the study, 503 (28.2%) were retained in care in the Ryan White system and 418 (23.5%) achieved virological suppression 366-730 days after diagnosis. (biomedsearch.com)
  • This is a collective health problem due not only to the high incidence of the disease but also to the delay in diagnosing it, once the diagnosis and early treatment of TB are essential factors in its control. (scielo.br)
  • In this perspective, the time the user waits from the appearance of the first symptoms to the search for primary healthcare service is a determining factor for the delay of the TB diagnosis. (scielo.br)
  • Having the ability to look at a patient on an individual basis will allow for a more accurate diagnosis and specific treatment plan. (wikipedia.org)
  • This screening measure performed by HCT's can help create awareness and assist in the diagnosis and prevention of patient depression. (wikipedia.org)
  • HTM includes the business processes used in interaction and oversight of the technology involved in the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • outcomes
  • Although prior studies showed that home telecare could improve outcomes from patients with congestive heart failure and reduce the cost of their care (Jerant et al. (igi-global.com)
  • Spirituality is a valuable tool that patients may use independently to improve their physiological and mental states of pain and discomfort, enabling people to worry less, possibly leading to better health outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • Crossing the Quality Chasm would focus more broadly on overuse (applying medical resources and treatments with insufficient evidence that they lead to greater outcomes), underuse (failing to apply resources or treatments with known benefits), and misuse (failing to execute care safely and correctly) of health care resources and treatments. (wikipedia.org)
  • And the main focuses of the institution are the development and verification of modern training and medical treatment programmes for people with diabetes mellitus, the training of trainers, the evaluation of new technologies and the gathering of patient-reported outcomes. (wikipedia.org)
  • preventative
  • A nationally representative sample of older adults was used to estimate the effects of religious salience and denomination on six different types of preventative health care (i.e. (isharonline.org)
  • This approach uses the same sequencing technology to focus on the evaluation of disease risk, allowing the physician to initiate preventative treatment before the disease presents itself in their patient. (wikipedia.org)
  • Improved access to health related information on the web via semantic and networked resources will facilitate an improved understanding of health issues with the goal of increasing patient self-management, preventative care and enhancing health professional expertise. (wikipedia.org)
  • patient's
  • Rahimpour, 2006), a kind of new innovative technology, is designed to record clinical indicators of a patient's health status and provides feedback to patients including medication reminders and measurement scheduling (Celler et al. (igi-global.com)
  • Contact precautions are intended to prevent transmission of infectious agents, including epidemiologically important microorganisms, which are spread by direct or indirect contact with the patient or the patient's environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Healthcare personnel caring for patients on contact precautions wear a gown and gloves for all interactions that may involve contact with the patient or potentially contaminated areas in the patient's environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Third, that they are system-minded or that they look at a patient's care needs as crossing organizational, even competitive, boundaries and that they are not limited to a single experience with a hospital or clinic. (wikipedia.org)
  • mainly
  • 7 - 9 This information comes mainly from quantitative studies, but such studies often do not allow a detailed exploration of the beliefs and values that shape the attitudes of patients. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • It consists mainly in providing future parents with pertinent, unbiased information on primal health and supporting them during their child's primal period of life (i.e., "from conception to first anniversary" according to definition by the Primal Health Research Centre, London). (wikipedia.org)
  • This has mainly come about because health authorities are reluctant to bear the cost of the test strips and lancets. (wikipedia.org)
  • The hospital cared mainly for the poor, many of them recent immigrants, until the 20th century. (wikipedia.org)
  • Controversy over these provisions mainly centers on Section 166.046, Subsection (e),1 which allows a health care facility to discontinue life-sustaining treatment ten days after giving written notice if the continuation of life-sustaining treatment is considered futile care by the treating medical team. (wikipedia.org)
  • Practice
  • The main barriers to improving influenza immunisation uptake in older people appear to be negative patient attitudes, beliefs of primary care providers, and a lack of organised approaches in general practice. (pubmedcentralcanada.ca)
  • Fee splitting is the practice of sharing fees with professional colleagues, such as physicians or lawyers, in return for being sent referrals This is essentially the payment of a commission to the referrer with the express intention of ensuring that the referring doctor directs referrals of patients to the payee. (wikipedia.org)
  • It is also called as 'CUT' (also spoken as Cee-You-Tee) practice in many parts of the world including India for its reference to a 'cut' from the patients bill. (wikipedia.org)
  • Many countries do not allow promotion of health services via mass media, advertisements and other direct promotions, and in a significant way, information on pricing and quality of care institutions and medicines reaches to patient through their primary care physician, many of whom indulge in a referral fee split unethical practice to refer a patient for business to a higher specialist, brand prescription and admissions. (wikipedia.org)
  • utilization
  • One possible explanation for this relationship that has not received much attention in the literature is that health care utilization may differ by religious involvement or religious denomination. (isharonline.org)
  • Healthcare Technology Management (sometimes referred to as clinical engineering, clinical engineering management, clinical technology management, healthcare technology management, medical equipment management, biomedical maintenance, biomedical equipment management, and biomedical engineering) is a term for the professionals who manage operations, analyze and improve utilization and safety, and support servicing healthcare technology. (wikipedia.org)
  • Regardless of the various titles, these professionals offer services within and outside of healthcare settings to enhance the safety, utilization, and performance on medical devices, applications, and systems. (wikipedia.org)
  • Physicians
  • Medical technician students will complete the following courses: Anatomy/Physiology I & II Clinical Competencies I & II Medical Coding & other various administrative courses Pharmacology Medical Terminology Upon graduation and certification qualification, health technologist will be gainfully employed by: Hospitals, physicians' offices, and specialty clinics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another section specifies that clinics, laboratories, hospitals or other health care facilities which compensate physicians for referral of patients are engaged in fee-splitting, which is unethical. (wikipedia.org)
  • Psychiatric
  • Psychiatric mental health nursing: from suffering to hope. (wikipedia.org)
  • Among its Definitions of Unprofessional Conduct, the "West Hudson Psychiatric Society Virtual Newsletter" (1997) lists Offering, giving or receiving a fee for the referral of a patient (fee splitting), or permitting any person other than an employee or associate to share in your fee, who has not provided an appropriate service directly under your supervision. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1999
  • A follow-up to the frequently cited 1999 IOM patient safety report To Err Is Human: Building a Safer Health System, Crossing the Quality Chasm advocates for a fundamental redesign of the U.S. health care system. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Texas Advance Directives Act (1999), also known as the Texas Futile Care Law, describes certain provisions that are now Chapter 166 of the Texas Health & Safety Code. (wikipedia.org)
  • diabetes
  • Due to this work he is considered the "father of biosensors," especially with respect to the glucose sensing for diabetes patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • In North America, hospitals resisted adoption of meter glucose measurements for inpatient diabetes care for over a decade. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patients with diabetes and their endocrinologists eventually persuaded acceptance. (wikipedia.org)
  • This includes the treatment of patients with complicated diabetes foot ulcers, complex accompanying diseases and secondary complications. (wikipedia.org)
  • Another medical focus is the treatment of disorders in motivation and acceptance as well as the treatment of diabetes mellitus associated with depression and other psychosomatic disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • Annually about 400 children and adolescents with diabetes mellitus are treated as in-patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • With respect to these disease management programmes, the Diabetes-Clinic is the third level of patient-centred health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Diabetes-Academy is a non-profit foundation for diabetes mellitus in matters of science, education (for medical professionals and other professional groups) as well as valuable patient information. (wikipedia.org)
  • Donations help to support measures purposeful which enable a more optimised diabetes care for children and adolescents. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hospitals
  • The origins of hospitals, and the care provided within them, is closely linked with the rise of early Christianity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The care provided in these hospitals still focused on spirituality as before. (wikipedia.org)
  • The care provided in these hospitals was dictated by the Daughter's agenda, which was mostly providing spiritual care for the dying as well as alms for the poor. (wikipedia.org)
  • Though hospitals were used to house specific groups of people (orphans, the poor, prostitutes, immigrants), they were also legitimately involved in their care, and were not just another form of penitentiary. (wikipedia.org)
  • Overcrowding created very poor health conditions, which in turn gave these hospitals high mortality rates - nearly 25% at the Hotel Dieu. (wikipedia.org)
  • The best medical care was reserved for only those would could afford it, and the poor population of France's general hospitals very often could not. (wikipedia.org)
  • Equipment control and asset management involves the management of medical devices within a facility and may be supported by automated information systems (e.g., enterprise resource planning (ERP) systems are often found in U.S. hospitals, and the U.S. military health system uses an advanced automated system known as the Defense Medical Logistics Standard Support (DMLSS) suite of applications). (wikipedia.org)
  • According to their website, the Joint Commission (JCI) have no published view on the issue of fee splitting, and in fact the Joint Commission stopped trying to provide guidance on medical ethics to American hospitals many years ago, preferring to concentrate on less challenging areas of healthcare assessment, despite the vast importance of medical ethics to patient safety. (wikipedia.org)
  • beds
  • In multi-patient rooms, >3 feet spatial separation between beds is advised to reduce the opportunities for inadvertent sharing of items between the infected/colonized patient and other patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • 3 feet and drawing the curtain between patient beds is especially important for patients in multi-bed rooms with infections transmitted by the droplet route. (wikipedia.org)
  • evaluate
  • Personalised health care is based on the dynamics of systems biology and uses predictive tools to evaluate health risks and to design personalised health plans to help patients mitigate risks, prevent disease and to treat it with precision when it occurs. (wikipedia.org)
  • They can be trained to ask emotional health questions/survey's to evaluate the standing of patients mental health. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2002, the Society for Simulation in Healthcare (SSH) was formed to become a leader in international interprofessional advances the application of medical simulation in healthcare The need for a "uniform mechanism to educate, evaluate, and certify simulation instructors for the health care profession" was recognized by McGaghie et al. (wikipedia.org)
  • gaps
  • Equity looks at closing racial and income gaps in health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • The report identified numerous barriers to successful health care transformation, including: inconsistent or fluctuating goals, picking measurements that do not align with the goals, gaps caused by leadership turnover, low investment, outdated technology, unsustainable financing, threat of litigation, overregulation, and professional education that focuses on individual services rather than the system perspective. (wikipedia.org)
  • 2001
  • Crossing the Quality Chasm: A New Health System for the 21st Century is report on health care quality in the United States published by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) on March 1, 2001. (wikipedia.org)
  • behaviors
  • Although most of the variation between individuals has no effect on health, an individual's health stems from genetic variation with behaviors and influences from the environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Spirituality can also interfere in an inverse way with self-care behaviors. (wikipedia.org)
  • As a result, they could unintentionally be worsening their conditions by discontinuing medically based self-care behaviors. (wikipedia.org)
  • infectious
  • Because these pathogens do not remain infectious over long distances in a healthcare facility, special air handling and ventilation are not required to prevent droplet transmission. (wikipedia.org)
  • A much-needed addition to the main building and funded by local businessman John Watkins, the Watkins Wing opened in January 1863 to treat patients with infectious diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • assess
  • When a single-patient room is not available, consultation with infection control personnel is recommended to assess the various risks associated with other patient placement options (e.g., cohorting, keeping the patient with an existing roommate). (wikipedia.org)
  • By developing personal relationships with their patients and their families, health professionals can better assess patients' spiritual situation. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical procedure
  • Personalized medicine, also termed precision medicine, is a medical procedure that separates patients into different groups-with medical decisions, practices, interventions and/or products being tailored to the individual patient based on their predicted response or risk of disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • METHODS
  • Medical physics (also called biomedical physics, medical biophysics or applied physics in medicine) is, generally speaking, the application of physics concepts, theories and methods to medicine or healthcare. (wikipedia.org)
  • Support
  • Providers who are uncomfortable accommodating an integrative approach to care should consult with other practitioners skilled in providing spiritual care, so that patients can integrate spiritual support into their own self-care The concept of "spirituality" in healt care has been criticised. (wikipedia.org)
  • Eysenbach G, Powell J, Englesakis M, Rizo C, Stern A. Health related virtual communities and electronic support groups: systematic review of the effects of online peer to peer interactions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Facilities or healthcare delivery networks may rely on a combination of equipment service providers such as manufacturers, third-party services, in-house technicians, and remote support. (wikipedia.org)
  • It can involve simulated human patients - artificial, human or a combination of the two, educational documents with detailed simulated animations, casualty assessment in homeland security and military situations, emergency response, and support virtual health functions with holographic simulation. (wikipedia.org)
  • comprises
  • Just as health comprises a variety of physical and mental states, so do disease and disability, which are affected by environmental factors, genetic predisposition, disease agents, and lifestyle choices. (wikipedia.org)
  • respectively
  • Among the behavioral variables, self-medication and the first health service sought had a statistically significant association with the time for seeking care (p = 0.020, and p = 0.033, respectively). (scielo.br)
  • facilitate
  • 2003). Generally, HTMS incorporates an extensive suite of clinical instruments including a wireless weight scale, single lead electrocardiogram, hemadynamometer, spirometer, thermometer, (pulse) oximeter, uricometer, and Internet enabled tools to facilitate patient management long-distance by the healthcare team (Rahimpour, 2006). (igi-global.com)
  • Research
  • The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) has co-sponsored, with the National Institute for Healthcare Research, 4 conferences, on curricular development in spirituality and medicine since 1997. (wikipedia.org)
  • Definitive evidence of health benefit from interaction with health-related virtual communities is currently lacking as further research needs to be performed. (wikipedia.org)
  • Patient safety/risk management (including volunteers in biomedical research, carers, comforters and persons subjected to non-medical imaging exposures. (wikipedia.org)
  • Surveillance of medical devices and evaluation of clinical protocols to ensure the ongoing protection of patients, volunteers in biomedical research, carers, comforters and persons subjected to non-medical imaging exposures from the deleterious effects of physical agents in accordance with the latest published evidence or own research when the available evidence is not sufficient. (wikipedia.org)
  • Surveillance of medical devices and evaluation of clinical protocols with respect to protection of workers and public when impacting the exposure of patients, volunteers in biomedical research, carers, comforters and persons subjected to non-medical imaging exposures or responsibility with respect to own safety. (wikipedia.org)
  • Research regarding healthcare simulation has advanced and proliferated in the past decade. (wikipedia.org)
  • approaches
  • While the tailoring of treatment to patients dates back at least to the time of Hippocrates, the term has risen in usage in recent years given the growth of new diagnostic and informatics approaches that provide understanding of the molecular basis of disease, particularly genomics. (wikipedia.org)
  • The concepts of personalised medicine can be applied to new and transformative approaches to health care. (wikipedia.org)
  • Adult
  • This health promotion par excellence is based on the 'new knowledge' in molecular biology, in particular on epigenetic knowledge, which points to how much affective - as well as physical - environment during fetal and newborn life may determine each and every aspect of adult health. (wikipedia.org)
  • physician
  • Bivariate analyses and logistic models were used to examine the independent effects of patient and physician characteristics on physician decisions. (umassmed.edu)
  • quality
  • In the late 1990s, the IOM established a committee and formal program to study health care quality that lead to the development of To Err Is Human and Crossing the Quality Chasm: the Committee on Quality of Health Care in America and the Program on Quality of Health Care in America. (wikipedia.org)
  • They were inspired by an article published by the IOM-sponsored National Roundtable on Health Care Quality in the Journal of the American Medical Association about the harm to patients caused by medical errors. (wikipedia.org)
  • Simultaneously, the National Cancer Policy Board and the President's Advisory Commission on Consumer Protection and Quality in the Health Care Industry published similar reports. (wikipedia.org)
  • Crossing the Quality Chasm identifies and recommends improvements in six dimensions of health care in the U.S.: patient safety, care effectiveness, patient-centeredness, timeliness, care efficiency, and equity. (wikipedia.org)
  • The first recommendation in Crossing the Quality Chasm relates to setting patient-centric goals for improving the U.S. health care system. (wikipedia.org)
  • It proposes making clear, comprehensive, and bold goals for quality improvement and that those goals should focus on improving patient experiences, the cost to each patient, and equity across disparate racial and income populations. (wikipedia.org)
  • provide
  • Therefore, sequencing RNA can provide a broader understanding of a person's state of health. (wikipedia.org)
  • Their efforts contributed to funding the Empire Wing in 1914 which was built to provide additional private accommodation for paying patients. (wikipedia.org)
  • These virtual communities provide a real-time resource for obtaining health-related knowledge and counselling. (wikipedia.org)
  • Healthcare technicians provide two levels of care, direct and indirect. (wikipedia.org)
  • These duties include: Cleaning of duty specific equipment Use of atypical equipment Completion of qualification to provide specific care Knowledge based studies to enhance the work environment Most allied health programs are of associate degree levels or state issued certification. (wikipedia.org)
  • It also includes the staff and systems which provide IT solutions related to health care. (wikipedia.org)