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  • 2017
  • Dec. 12, 2017--Children exposed to coarse particulate matter may be more likely to develop asthma and to be treated in an ER or be hospitalized for the condition, according to new research published online in the American Thoracic Society's American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine . (eurekalert.org)
  • lung
  • Particulate matter can reduce lung functioning and can cause or aggravate respiratory conditions, and increase the long term risk of lung cancer or other lung disease such as emphysema, bronchiectasis, pulmonary fibrosis, and cystic lungs. (fcgov.com)
  • A robust association has been observed between fine particulate levels and lung cancer, and cardiopulmonary disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • effects
  • In certain cases, especially for combinations of particulate matter with ozone or allergens , effects were shown to be even greater than the sum of the individual effects. (greenfacts.org)
  • Dr. Keet noted that the EPA is currently conducting a comprehensive review of the science related to the health effects of particulate matter as mandated by the Clean Air Act. (eurekalert.org)
  • levels
  • Up until 1987, the EPA standard for particulates was based on levels of TSP. (fcgov.com)
  • What are particulate matter levels in Fort Collins? (fcgov.com)
  • Levels of particulate matter in a southeast Texas county were associated with "borderline significant" increases in the risk of ischemic stroke and transient ischemic attack, Lewis Morgenstern, M.D., of the University of Michigan, and colleagues reported online in the Annals of Neurology . (medpagetoday.com)
  • When levels of fine particulate matter rose by 5.1 ug/m 3 the risk of suffering one of the events increased by 3% that day (RR 1.03, 95% CI 0.99 to 1.07) and the day after (RR 1.03, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.07). (medpagetoday.com)
  • Area
  • Once the state submits a request to designate an area as "nonattainment" for Particulate Matter (PM), the EPA has 18 months to approve the request. (alaska.gov)
  • mass
  • The filter is weighed on an analytical balance before and after sampling, and the difference in weight divided by the volume of air pulled through the filter gives the mass concentration of the particulate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Environmental science and health often uses the mass concentration (M), defined as the mass of particulate matter per unit volume with units such as μg/m3. (wikipedia.org)
  • water
  • Specifically, it is capable of simulating the refraction of light through a transparent substance such as glass or water, diffuse interreflection between illuminated objects, the subsurface scattering of light in translucent materials, and some of the effects caused by particulate matter such as smoke or water vapor. (wikipedia.org)
  • a single process is not sufficient to extract the different forms of water and matter found in fuel. (wikipedia.org)
  • Typical advanced fuel polishing system (W-PFS) During the fuel polishing process, multiple stages are required to effectively remove the solid particulates, wet foreign matter and water from the fuel. (wikipedia.org)
  • The pressure side process is often referred to as the final or finishing stage, where 2 micron particulate is removed and the fuel's final water content is extracted to within the efficiency of the filter stages. (wikipedia.org)
  • There were significant traces of faecal matter in 63% of faucets, and 20% of the water samples collected from various city hospitals were also found to be contaminated. (wikipedia.org)
  • remove
  • They can also be used to remove particulate matter from air streams by first charging the air, and then passing the charged stream through a comb of alternating polarity, to deposit the charged particles onto oppositely charged plates. (wikipedia.org)
  • environment
  • They include subjecting cleanroom staff to strict clothing regulations, and there is often a gowning room where the staff can change clothes under sterile conditions so as to prevent any particulates from entering from the outside environment. (wikipedia.org)
  • Particulates can enter by air, or on the feet of any carrier moving between the external environment and inside the critical area, for example. (wikipedia.org)