• ions
  • Experimental data show that the presence of peptides, bacteria, micromycetes and viruses, Mg 2+ , and CO 3 2− ions in the solution stabilizes the calcium oxalate dehydrate crystallization. (springer.com)
  • Oxalate is a compound found in foods that are rich in metal ions, and it can cause the build-up of calcium inside the body. (reference.com)
  • crystalline
  • It is a white, crystalline, odorless solid, that decomposes above 290 °C. Disodium oxalate can act as a reducing agent, and it may be used as a primary standard for standardizing potassium permanganate (KMnO4) solutions. (wikipedia.org)
  • enzyme
  • This enzyme catalyses the following chemical reaction: oxalate + oxidized ferredoxin ⇌ {\displaystyle \rightleftharpoons } 2 CO2 + reduced ferredoxin This enzyme contains thiamine diphosphate and [4Fe-4S] clusters. (wikipedia.org)
  • This enzyme is also called oxalate carboxy-lyase. (wikipedia.org)
  • The systematic name of this enzyme class is oxalate:oxygen oxidoreductase. (wikipedia.org)
  • An oxalate degrading enzyme is a type of enzyme that catalyzes the biodegradation of oxalate. (wikipedia.org)
  • Oxalate oxidase (Enzyme Commission number EC 1.2.3.4)occurs mainly in plants. (wikipedia.org)
  • Brown rot fungi secrete oxalate to break down cellulose fibers of wood, but deploy this enzyme to permit regulatory control over the total quantity of oxalate present. (wikipedia.org)
  • diphenyl
  • Diphenyl oxalate (trademark name Cyalume) is a solid ester whose oxidation products are responsible for the chemiluminescence in a glowstick. (wikipedia.org)
  • The reaction with hydrogen peroxide that diphenyl oxalate undergoes produces phenol and 1,2-dioxetanedione, which excites the dye and releases a photon as it decomposes to carbon dioxide. (wikipedia.org)
  • crystallography
  • further explanation needed] Another OOR from acetogenic bacteria, a thiamine pyrophosphate(TPP)-dependent OOR, had its mechanism of action decoded step by step under X-ray crystallography to rather simplistically (one-carbon) split oxalate, producing low-potential electrons and C02. (wikipedia.org)
  • nephropathy
  • Nephrocalcinosis, acute calcium oxalate (CaOx) nephropathy, and renal stone disease can lead to inflammation and subsequent renal failure, but the underlying pathological mechanisms remain elusive. (labome.org)
  • yields
  • The loss of the second proton, which yields the oxalate ion has an equilibrium constant of 5.25 × 10−5 (pKa = 4.28). (wikipedia.org)