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  • thin
  • The medial orbital wall is thin and perforated not only by numerous blood valveless vessels and nerves but also by numerous other defects (Zuckerkandl dehiscences). (health-disease.org)
  • lesions
  • So far, very few cases of extranodal RDD with multiple CNS lesions involving the orbital region have been described. (hindawi.com)
  • Computer software applications have been tasked with the automated assessment of retinal images to recognize lesions associated with an ocular disease of interest. (wikipedia.org)
  • The clinical process entails initially discriminating retinal lesions from non-factor artifacts, subsequently distinguishing lesions associated with the disease in question from other types of lesions, and finally grading the disease according to guideline-endorsed severity scales set by medical authorities. (wikipedia.org)
  • orbit
  • High altitude cerebral edema Granulomatosis with polyangiitis Neoplastic: Leukemias Meningioma, (of sphenoid wing) Nasopharyngeal angiofibroma Hand-Schüller-Christian disease Hemangioma, cavernous Cystic: Dermoid cyst Vascular: Carotid-cavernous fistula Aortic insufficiency: manifests as a pulsatile pseudoproptosis, described by British cardiothoracic surgeon, Hutan Ashrafian in 2006 Others: Orbital fracture: apex, floor, medial wall, zygomatic Retrobulbar hemorrhage: trauma to the orbit can lead to bleeding behind the eye. (wikipedia.org)
  • In more severe and active disease, mass effects and cicatricial changes occur within the orbit. (wikipedia.org)
  • Orbital lymphoma: Is it necessary to treat the entire orbit? (wikipedia.org)
  • Graves
  • About 3-5% of patients with Graves' Disease will have involvement of the eyes, referred to as Graves' Ophtalmopathy. (subent.com)
  • It occurs most commonly in individuals with Graves' disease, and less commonly in individuals with Hashimoto's thyroiditis, or in those who are euthyroid. (wikipedia.org)
  • However, some patients with Graves' orbitopathy present with neither anti-microsomal nor anti-thyroglobulin nor anti-TSH receptor antibodies, the antibodies identified in Graves' disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • In this small percentage of patients, orbital decompression may be called. (doctorparpados.com)
  • Orbital fat specimens from patients without TED, as well as cadaveric orbital fat, served as controls. (aao.org)
  • In samples from patients with acute TED with a clinical activity score of more than 4, there was increased staining of CD31-positive blood ves-sels, as well as rare staining of podo-planin-positive lymphatic vessels with-in acutely inflamed orbital fat tissue. (aao.org)
  • With the addition of Dr. Wei Patch to the team of surgeons at Ophthalmic Associates of the Southern Tier, we can now offer cutting-edge orbital procedures to our patients. (eyedoctorsofsoutherntier.com)
  • Patients who were undergoing orbital decompression at the Illinois Eye and Ear Infirmary received complete eye examinations, including Goldmann perimetry, preoperatively and at post-operative visits. (arvojournals.org)
  • Management of patients with this disease is often multidisciplinary and includes endocrinologists, internists, strabismus surgeons, ophthalmologists and oculoplastic surgeons. (chesapeakeeyecare.com)
  • Patients experiencing severe sight-threatening progression of the disease often require high-dose steroid treatment, radiation therapy or surgery to decompress the eye and preserve sight. (chesapeakeeyecare.com)
  • Patients with sickle cell disease are susceptible to infarction of the orbital bones during vaso-occlusive crises. (pubfacts.com)
  • ECD families and patients are also supported by the Histiocytosis Association, Inc. ECD patients, families, and caregivers are encouraged to join the NIH Rare Lung Diseases Consortium Contact Registry. (wikipedia.org)
  • acute
  • These findings imply that orbital edema in acute TED may be mediated, in part, by both the formation of new, immature blood vessels and the formation of lymphatic capillaries that are functionally inca-pable of draining interstitial fluid. (aao.org)
  • Both acute, fulminant disease and indolent, subacute presentations have been reported in the literature. (wikipedia.org)
  • Trauma
  • A cataract is an opacification or cloudiness of the eye's crystalline lens due to aging, disease, or trauma that typically prevents light from forming a clear image on the retina. (wikipedia.org)
  • Symptoms
  • Symptoms typically begin as blurred vision, usually pronounced when one eye is closed (due to the unilateral nature of the disease). (wikipedia.org)
  • Eye signs in TED In moderate active disease, the signs and symptoms are persistent and increasing and include myopathy. (wikipedia.org)
  • Other diseases such as acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and hypertension are commonly found to have associated ocular symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnosis is difficult due to its gradual onset and the fact that the symptoms are the same as other diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • dislocation
  • Brain imaging studies revealed on the left an extra-axial thickening of the dura mater with enhancement and perilesional oedema, infiltrating the sphenoorbital fissure and an isointense mass with enhancement in the orbital region with dislocation of the optic nerve. (hindawi.com)
  • Diagnosis
  • The presence of symmetrical cerebellar and pontine signal changes on T2-weighted images seem to be typical of ECD, however, multiple sclerosis and metabolic diseases must also be considered in the differential diagnosis. (wikipedia.org)
  • infiltration
  • On histological examination, there is an infiltration of the orbital connective tissue by lymphocytes, plasmocytes, and mastocytes. (wikipedia.org)
  • The disease involves an infiltration of lipid-laden macrophages, multinucleated giant cells, an inflammatory infiltrate of lymphocytes and histiocytes in the bone marrow, and a generalized sclerosis of the long bones. (wikipedia.org)
  • adnexal
  • Current teleophthalmological solutions are generally focused on a particular eye problem, such as diabetic retinopathy, retinopathy of prematurity, macular degeneration, strabismus and adnexal eye diseases. (wikipedia.org)
  • manifestations
  • It has also been speculated that ligneous conjunctivitis may be a manifestation of IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD). As is the case with other manifestations of IgG4-related disease, a prompt response to steroid therapy is a characteristic feature of IgG4-ROD in most cases, unless significant fibrosis has already occurred. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diabetes, for example, is the leading cause of new cases of blindness in those aged 20-74, with ocular manifestations such as diabetic retinopathy and macular edema affecting up to 80% of those who have had the disease for 15 years or more[citation needed]. (wikipedia.org)
  • examination
  • On funduscopic eye examination, the retinal vessels in early Coats' disease appear tortuous and dilated, mainly confined to the peripheral and temporal portions of retina. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissue
  • In the setting of extensive sclerosis there may be restriction, compression, and destruction of orbital tissue. (wikipedia.org)
  • They also investigated the tenet that orbital adipose tissue lacks lymphatic vessels. (aao.org)
  • Erdheim-Chester disease (also known as Erdheim-Chester syndrome or polyostotic sclerosing histiocytosis) is a rare disease characterized by the abnormal multiplication of a specific type of white blood cells called histiocytes, or tissue macrophages (technically, this disease is termed a non-Langerhans-cell histiocytosis). (wikipedia.org)
  • Magnetic
  • Magnetic resonance images (MRI) from dogs with no clinical evidence of orbital disease and a reportedly normal MRI study were retrieved and reviewed. (avmi.net)
  • Orbital bone infarction and subperiosteal hematoma were seen in magnetic resonance imaging. (pubfacts.com)
  • syndrome
  • Overall, radiographic features for idiopathic orbital inflammatory syndrome vary widely. (wikipedia.org)
  • He was diagnosed as having orbital compression syndrome secondary to vaso-occlusive crisis of sickle cell disease and was treated with intravenous ampicilin-sulbactam and methylprednisolone. (pubfacts.com)
  • Sickle beta-thalassemia presenting as orbital compression syndrome. (pubfacts.com)
  • Orbital compression syndrome in sickle cell disease. (pubfacts.com)
  • Varicella (chickenpox) Rubeola (measles) Rubella (German measles) Variola (smallpox) Vaccinia Herpes simplex Herpes zoster Mumps Infectious mononucleosis Influenza Cytomegalic inclusion disease Pharyngoconjunctival fever (adenovirus 3) Epidemic keratoconjunctivitis (adenovirus 8) Human immunodeficiency virus (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) Ebola Rift Valley Fever Dengue Hantavirus Bwaka, Mpia A. (wikipedia.org)
  • radiotherapy
  • Interdisciplinary Management of Orbital Diseases: Textbook and Atlas brings this team together to offer comprehensive and authoritative discussion of all diseases of the orbital region, with descriptions of topographic and surgical anatomy, pathology, diagnostic steps, imaging, conservative treatment measures, operative approaches, radiotherapy, and orbital reconstruction. (axon.es)
  • Orbital lymphoma can be diagnosed via a biopsy of the eye and is usually treated with radiotherapy or with combination with chemotherapy. (wikipedia.org)
  • citation needed] Radiotherapy is the most effective treatment for local disease either as the sole treatment for low-grade lymphoma or in combination with chemotherapy for intermediate- and high-grade lymphoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Radiotherapy dose in range of 30-45 Gy administered in fractions are advised in treating the local orbital lymphomas. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • The successful evaluation and treatment of the orbital region-subject to a wide range of diseases affecting multiple organ systems-entails the knowledge and expertise of a multidisciplinary team of specialists. (axon.es)
  • For other causes, the treatment is specific to the causative disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • eyeball
  • Orbital decompression is performed by removing significant portions of about 2 ½-2 ¾ of the walls, allowing the abnormally enlarged soft tissues to expand into the surrounding structures, then allowing the eyeball to return to a more normal position. (subent.com)
  • congenital
  • Coats' disease, (also known as exudative retinitis or retinal telangiectasis, sometimes spelled Coates' disease), is a rare congenital, nonhereditary eye disorder, causing full or partial blindness, characterized by abnormal development of blood vessels behind the retina. (wikipedia.org)
  • tissues
  • The early stages of disease in humans are often asymptomatic, but the spargana typically cause a painful inflammatory reaction in the tissues surrounding the subcutaneous site as they grow. (wikipedia.org)
  • thin
  • The medial orbital wall is thin and perforated not only by numerous blood valveless vessels and nerves but also by numerous other defects (Zuckerkandl dehiscences). (health-disease.org)
  • orbit
  • His research proposal attempts to evaluate the molecular mechanisms underlying the lack of lymphatic vessels within the orbit and to test the hypothesis that the lack of lymphatic vessels within the orbit is involved in the pathogenesis of thyroid eye disease. (thyroid.org)
  • At least 10 other dogs were launched into orbit and numerous others on sub-orbital flights before the historic date of 12 April 1961, when Yuri Gagarin became the first human in space. (wikipedia.org)
  • The orbit of the eye, including mechanical restrictions of eye movement, as in Graves disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • thyroid
  • His research is focused primarily on vasculogenesis and his interest in thyroid eye disease stems from the realization that both the retina and orbital tissues contain blood vessels, but lack lymphatic vessels. (thyroid.org)
  • include
  • These hazards include the vacuum environment of space, temperature extremes ranging from -250 degrees Fahrenheit to 250 degrees Fahrenheit, the impact of micrometeoroids and orbital debris, and lunar dust. (wikipedia.org)
  • Center
  • MicroOCT has the contrast and resolution required to investigate the cellular and subcellular components underlying coronary atherosclerosis, the disease that precipitates heart attack," says Gary Tearney, MD, PhD, of the Wellman Center and the MGH Pathology Department, who led the study. (innovations-report.com)
  • treatment
  • Naturally occurring as well as synthetic steroidal glucocorticoids have been widely used for over fifty years for the treatment of acute and chronic inflammatory and immune disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, rheumatic fever, asthma, allergic rhinitis, systemic lupus erythematosus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, Crohn's disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and ulcerative colitis. (patentsencyclopedia.com)
  • There is no consensus on an appropriate treatment approach of esthesioneuroblastoma because of the rarity of the disease. (wikipedia.org)