• cavity
  • This leaves an empty socket where bone is exposed to the oral cavity, causing a localized alveolar osteitis limited to the lamina dura (i.e., the bone which lines the socket). (wikipedia.org)
  • Gingivostomatitis must also be differentiated from herpangina, another disease that also commonly causes ulcers in the oral cavity of children, but is caused by the Coxsackie A virus rather than a herpes virus. (wikipedia.org)
  • Systemic
  • It is often mistakenly referred to as "Bluetongue virus" (BTV), another Orbivirus that, like EHDV, causes the host to develop a characteristic blue tongue due to systemic hemorrhaging and lack of oxygen in the blood. (wikipedia.org)
  • symptoms
  • it is otherwise difficult to predict the site and origin of the hemorrhage from the symptoms. (wikipedia.org)
  • Also, reports on teething difficulties have recorded symptoms which are remarkably consistent with primary oral herpetic infection such as fever, irritability, sleeplessness, and difficulty with eating. (wikipedia.org)
  • Depending upon the underlying cause, there may be additional signs and symptoms such as pallor, oral ulceration and angular cheilitis. (wikipedia.org)
  • nasal
  • Be it: nasal, rectal, oral, it also includes bleeding from scrapes, cuts, bruises (big bruises that do not disappear in the first two to three days). (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • Intraocular hemorrhage (bleeding into the eyeball) may occur in response to the raised pressure: subhyaloid hemorrhage (bleeding under the hyaloid membrane, which envelops the vitreous body of the eye) and vitreous hemorrhage may be visible on fundoscopy. (wikipedia.org)
  • The high plasma concentrations of adrenaline also may cause cardiac arrhythmias (irregularities in the heart rate and rhythm), electrocardiographic changes (in 27 percent of cases) and cardiac arrest (in 3 percent of cases) may occur rapidly after the onset of hemorrhage. (wikipedia.org)
  • Iron-deficiency anemia is mainly caused by blood loss, such as may occur during menses or gastrointestinal hemorrhage. (wikipedia.org)
  • mucosa
  • Hemorrhage and lack of oxygen in the blood results in a blue appearance of the oral mucosa which is where the name "bluetongue" comes from. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gingivostomatitis (also known as primary herpetic gingivostomatitis or orolabial herpes) is a combination of gingivitis and stomatitis, or an inflammation of the oral mucosa and gingiva. (wikipedia.org)
  • In herpetic gingivostomatitis, lesions can be found in these locations, but they are almost always accompanied by ulcerations on the gums, lips, tongue or buccal mucosa and/or by hyperemia, hypertrophy or hemorrhage of the gums. (wikipedia.org)
  • commonly
  • While injected oxytocin is commonly used for hemorrhage prophylaxis in institutional settings, its use may be impractical if not impossible in areas where home birth is the norm and even skilled birth attendants are rare. (constantcontact.com)
  • Acute
  • Fibrinolysis syndrome (also known as "Defibrinating syndrome") is characterized by an acute hemorrhagic state brought about by inability of the blood to clot, with massive hemorrhages into the skin producing blackish, purplish swellings and sloughing. (wikipedia.org)
  • include
  • The objectives of ASSCID include an oral health and special needs educational role for dental professionals and other allied health workers. (wikipedia.org)
  • mouth
  • Treatment includes fluid intake, good oral hygiene and gentle debridement of the mouth, as well as oral acyclovir. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some use the term secondary burning mouth syndrome in cases where a detectable cause, such as glossitis, for an oral burning sensation. (wikipedia.org)
  • patients
  • The RUBY-1 phase II trial results show that oral administration of darexaban in combination with the standard dual antiplatelet therapy used for ACS patients caused a two- to four-fold increase in bleeding rates and no effect on ACS. (wikipedia.org)
  • results
  • This often results in a depapilled, atrophic glossitis, giving the tongue a bald and shiny appearance, along with pallor (paleness) of the lips and other mucous membranes a tendency towards recurrent oral ulceration, and cheilosis (swelling of the lips). (wikipedia.org)
  • large
  • The society also has a large focus on dental care for special needs children and avidly support oral health promotion. (wikipedia.org)
  • treatment
  • The review included 2 randomized trials and 4 non-randomized controlled trials comparing oral misoprostol vs. placebo or no treatment for women during the third stage of labor. (constantcontact.com)
  • dose
  • The starting dose is a single daily oral administration of one tablet of 15 mg carbimazole per cat. (vetuk.co.uk)
  • studies
  • The oral health therapist have incorporated studies to allow for their scope of practice to cover working with people with special needs. (wikipedia.org)
  • medical
  • Special needs dentistry, also known as special care dentistry, is a speciality of dentistry concerned with the oral health of people who have intellectual disability, or who are affected by other medical, physical, or psychiatric issues. (wikipedia.org)
  • Their additional needs may be due directly to their impairment or disability, or to some aspect of their medical history that affects their oral health, or because their social, environmental or cultural context disables them with reference to their oral health. (wikipedia.org)
  • care
  • It was founded in 1996 and is a State Government funded initiative that delivers oral health care to Victorian citizens who fit the eligibility criteria. (wikipedia.org)
  • All children enrolled in special or special developmental schools both in urban and rural areas are presented with the opportunity for oral health care at no cost at one or two year intervals. (wikipedia.org)
  • children
  • Striving for the best possible oral health conditions for babies, children and adolescents, including those who have special needs, is one of their main objectives. (wikipedia.org)