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  • inflammatory
  • Periapical cysts develop due to an inflammatory stimulus in 3 stages: Initial stage: Epithelial cells from the rests of Malassez at the apex of the roots of a non-vital tooth (one that has undergone root canal treatment) become stimulated due to the body's inflammatory response to bacterial endotoxins infecting the pulp or as a direct response to necrotic pulp tissue, therefore re-entering the growth phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • teeth
  • The most common location of dentigerous cysts are the Mandibular 3rd Molars and the Maxillary Canines, and they rarely involve deciduous teeth and are occasionally associated with odontomas. (wikipedia.org)
  • size
  • Pressure and concentration differences between the cystic cavity and the growth surroundings influence fluid movement into the cyst, causing size increase. (wikipedia.org)
  • The radiographic differentiation between a dentigerous cyst and a normal dental follicle is based merely on size. (wikipedia.org)
  • dental
  • Secondary symptoms of periapical cysts include inflammation and infection of the pulp causing dental caries. (wikipedia.org)
  • wall
  • Initially, the cyst swells to a round hard protrusion, but later on the body resorbs some of the cyst wall, leaving a softer accumulation of fluid underneath the mucous membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • Occasionally the wall of a dentigerous cyst may give rise to a more ominous mucoepidermoid carcinoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • growth
  • Cyst growth stage: Fluid flows into the cavity where the forming cyst is growing due to the increased osmolality of the cavity in relation to surrounding serum in capillaries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone resorption caused by metabolism of acidic substances produced by cysts contributes to cyst growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • The ratio of individuals diagnosed with periapical cysts is 3:2 male to female, as well as individuals between 20 and 60 years old. (wikipedia.org)
  • lesion
  • If the lesion is large it is more likely to be a cyst. (drtbalu.com)
  • The vast majority of cysts expand slowly, and the surrounding bone has time to increase its density around the lesion, which is the body's attempt to isolate the lesion. (wikipedia.org)
  • The existence of this lesion as a unique clinical entity is controversial, and some reported cases may have represented misdiagnosed odontogenic cysts, which are by far the most common type of intrabony cyst occurring in the jaws. (wikipedia.org)
  • pathological cavity
  • A cyst is a pathological cavity with fluid or semi-fluid contents which is not created by the accumulation of pus. (maths-in-medicine.org)
  • Kramer has defined cyst as "a pathological cavity having fluid, semi-fluid, or gaseous contents and which is not created by the accumulation of pus. (ccij-online.org)
  • Nasopalatine
  • Historically, the cause of nasopalatine duct cysts has been somewhat of an enigma. (wikipedia.org)
  • Radiographically, the nasopalatine cyst appears as a well-demarcated round, ovoid, or heart-shaped structure presenting in the midline of the maxilla. (wikipedia.org)
  • Diagnosis and surgical management of nasopalatine duct cysts. (wikipedia.org)
  • lumen
  • Focal thickened plaques of proliferating lining cells often project into the lumen areas which is commonly seent in this cyst. (wikipedia.org)
  • 3)Type 1C Ameloblast like proliferation in the connective tissue and lumen of the cyst may be seen. (wikipedia.org)
  • cavity
  • Cyst growth stage: Fluid flows into the cavity where the forming cyst is growing due to the increased osmolality of the cavity in relation to surrounding serum in capillaries. (wikipedia.org)
  • A cyst is a pathological epithelial lined cavity that fills with fluid or soft material and usually grows from internal pressure generated by fluid being drawn into the cavity from osmosis (hydrostatic pressure). (wikipedia.org)
  • clinical
  • Clinical features: As the cyst expands it causes erosion of the floor of the maxillary sinus. (drtbalu.com)
  • The increased KAI-1 expression in the radicular cysts and its downregulation in OKCs may be indicative of aggressive clinical behavior and the fact that OKCs are hypothesized as neoplastic rather than being developmental in origin. (ccij-online.org)