• inflammatory
  • Periapical cysts develop due to an inflammatory stimulus in 3 stages: Initial stage: Epithelial cells from the rests of Malassez at the apex of the roots of a non-vital tooth (one that has undergone root canal treatment) become stimulated due to the body's inflammatory response to bacterial endotoxins infecting the pulp or as a direct response to necrotic pulp tissue, therefore re-entering the growth phase. (wikipedia.org)
  • teeth
  • The most common location of dentigerous cysts are the Mandibular 3rd Molars and the Maxillary Canines, and they rarely involve deciduous teeth and are occasionally associated with odontomas. (wikipedia.org)
  • size
  • Pressure and concentration differences between the cystic cavity and the growth surroundings influence fluid movement into the cyst, causing size increase. (wikipedia.org)
  • The radiographic differentiation between a dentigerous cyst and a normal dental follicle is based merely on size. (wikipedia.org)
  • dental
  • Secondary symptoms of periapical cysts include inflammation and infection of the pulp causing dental caries. (wikipedia.org)
  • wall
  • Initially, the cyst swells to a round hard protrusion, but later on the body resorbs some of the cyst wall, leaving a softer accumulation of fluid underneath the mucous membrane. (wikipedia.org)
  • Occasionally the wall of a dentigerous cyst may give rise to a more ominous mucoepidermoid carcinoma. (wikipedia.org)
  • growth
  • Cyst growth stage: Fluid flows into the cavity where the forming cyst is growing due to the increased osmolality of the cavity in relation to surrounding serum in capillaries. (wikipedia.org)
  • Bone resorption caused by metabolism of acidic substances produced by cysts contributes to cyst growth. (wikipedia.org)
  • years
  • The ratio of individuals diagnosed with periapical cysts is 3:2 male to female, as well as individuals between 20 and 60 years old. (wikipedia.org)