• white-nose syn
  • Snake Fungal Disease: The White-Nose Syndrome for Reptiles? (nature.org)
  • Conservationists fear it could pose a similar threat to snakes as white-nose syndrome in bats. (nature.org)
  • white-nose syndrome was first documented in 2007 in New York and has since spread widely, killing millions of bats as far west as Oklahoma. (nature.org)
  • There has been a lot of money spent on white-nose syndrome , and a lot of educational outreach, but so far they've been unable to stop the spread in bats," says Emily Boedecker, acting state director for The Nature Conservancy in Vermont. (nature.org)
  • It is difficult to predict what will be a minor issue and what will devastate millions of animals - as has turned out to be the case with white-nose syndrome, and fungal diseases impacting amphibians. (nature.org)
  • Indiana bat populations in the northeastern United States are crashing with the rapid spread of white-nose syndrome, the most devastating wildlife disease in recent history. (wikipedia.org)
  • White-nose syndrome (WNS) is an emerging disease in North American bats which by 2012 was associated with at least 5-7 million bat deaths. (wikipedia.org)
  • As of 2012[update] white-nose syndrome was estimated to have caused at least 5.7 million to 6.7 million bat deaths in North America. (wikipedia.org)
  • The Forest Service estimated in 2008 that the die-off from white-nose syndrome means that at least 2.4 million pounds of insects (1.1 million kg) will go uneaten and become a financial burden to farmers, possibly leading to crop damage or having other economic impact in New England. (wikipedia.org)
  • 1863
  • In 1863 the Hospital for Diseases of the Throat in King Street, Golden Square, was founded, largely owing to his initiative, and by his work there and at the London Hospital (where he was one of the physicians from 1866 to 1873) Morell Mackenzie rapidly became recognized throughout Europe as a leading authority, and acquired an extensive practice. (wikipedia.org)
  • occur
  • Ninety percent of nose bleeds (epistaxis) occur in Little's area, as it is exposed to the drying effect of inspiratory currents and to finger nail trauma and is the usual site for epistaxis in children and young adults. (wikipedia.org)
  • breath
  • When you have an exhaled breath, there are all sorts of volatile organic compounds that are produced," says Serpil Erzurum, a pulmonologist at Cleveland Clinic and co-author of a 2005 study on the use of electronic noses to help diagnose lung cancer. (scientificamerican.com)
  • And the noses don't just analyze breath. (scientificamerican.com)
  • The identification of NA-NOSE patterns will be supported by analyzing the chemical composition of the breath using gas-chromatography in conjunction with mass-spectrometry (GC-MS). (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • clinic
  • Ear, nose and throat clinic at Karolinska University Hospital, Huddinge, opened in 1972 and was from the beginning a complete university clinic professor, teacher and assistant services established and affiliated to the Karolinska Institute. (ki.se)
  • treatment
  • sores, you could be the one that I will definitely have cold cold sores in the nose diseases sore treatment methods that have permanently cure it. (zapcoldsoresaway.com)
  • Treatment for a broken nose may include procedures that realign your nose. (pharmacypedia.org)
  • The treatment of chronic diseases accounts for 75% of all US healthcare costs (amounting to $1.7 trillion in 2009). (wikipedia.org)
  • No obvious treatment or means of preventing transmission is known, and some species have declined >90% within five years of the disease reaching a site. (wikipedia.org)
  • severe
  • These agents should not be used in patients with severe coronary artery disease or severe/uncontrolled hypertension. (drugs.com)
  • But, if the injury to your nose is less severe - accompanied only by swelling and moderate pain - you may choose to wait before seeing your doctor. (pharmacypedia.org)
  • Search
  • Engineers are developing electronic versions of the human nose that will allow doctors, ever in search of less-invasive techniques, to tap into what the nose knows about the human body. (scientificamerican.com)
  • Causes
  • Common causes of a broken nose include contact sports, physical fights, falls and motor vehicle accidents that result in facial trauma. (pharmacypedia.org)
  • Other causes or associations of disease are: a compromised immune system, environmental toxins, radiation exposure, diet and lifestyle choices, stress, and genetics. (wikipedia.org)
  • Neck
  • Likewise, nose fractures resulting from high-velocity injuries - like those experienced in motor vehicle accidents - may be accompanied by injuries to your neck. (pharmacypedia.org)
  • If a blow is strong enough to break your nose, it may also be strong enough to damage the bones in your neck. (pharmacypedia.org)
  • in 1948 first reported this disease usually presents in Asian males in their 2nd to 4th decade as a mass in the head and neck region. (omicsonline.org)
  • trauma
  • Our patient is a 49 years old male with swelling on his nose following trauma, with elevated AEC and IgE levels. (omicsonline.org)
  • cause
  • Both diseases and bacteria that cause diseases have individual and unique odors. (scientificamerican.com)
  • A broken nose can cause pain, along with swelling and bruising around your nose and under your eyes. (pharmacypedia.org)
  • Other conditions are met to establish cause or association including studies in disease transmission. (wikipedia.org)
  • Direct visualization of the pathogen, the identification of different strains, immunological responses in the host, how the infection is spread and, the combination of these should all be taken into account to determine the probability that an infectious agent is the cause of the disease. (wikipedia.org)
  • Long-term, nasal polyps can cause destruction of the nasal bones and widening of the nose. (wikipedia.org)
  • Anterior
  • The arteries are: Anterior ethmoidal artery (branch of the ophthalmic artery) Sphenopalatine artery (terminal branch of the maxillary artery) Greater palatine artery (from the maxillary artery) Septal branch of the superior labial artery (from the facial artery) It runs vertically downwards just behind the columella, crosses the floor of the nose and joins venous plexus on the lateral nasal wall. (wikipedia.org)
  • Some polyps may be seen with anterior rhinoscopy (looking in the nose with a nasal speculum and a light), but frequently, they are farther back in the nose and must be seen by nasal endoscopy. (wikipedia.org)
  • populations
  • Hopefully this time conservationists can gather necessary information and develop strategies to stop the disease before it devastates snake populations. (nature.org)
  • Discriminant factor analysis will be applied to the NA-NOSE signals in order to detect statistically significant differences between the sub-populations, and classification success will be estimated using leave-one-out cross-validation. (clinicaltrials.gov)
  • Cold
  • Do not wait lemon balm herpes chat room until the oral medicinal cell rejuvenation nutrients necessary to cold sores in the nose diseases reduce foods contain ingredients to prevent its onset. (zapcoldsoresaway.com)
  • less
  • Combine these feats with the fact that artificial noses are faster, cheaper and less invasive than many other diagnostic tests, and it is easy to understand why physicians find the technology appealing. (scientificamerican.com)
  • List
  • A list of the more common and well-known diseases associated with infectious pathogens is provided and is not intended to be a complete listing. (wikipedia.org)
  • Edition
  • Although a first edition, this book is a natural evolution of a previous successful text 'Ear Disease of the Dog and Cat' by Richard G. Harvey, Joseph Harari and Agnès J. Delauche. (bmj.com)
  • The new edition of Diseases of the Ear, Nose and Throat Lecture Notes provides an updated and comprehensive overview of one of the fastest growing specialties in medicine. (wiley.com)
  • Health
  • From developing new therapies that treat and prevent disease to helping people in need, we are committed to improving health and well-being around the world. (merckvetmanual.com)
  • areas
  • The final section covers the perioperative and surgical management of diseases that affect all three areas. (bmj.com)
  • Common
  • Kimura's presenting as a soft tissue swelling in nose without any nodal involvement is not common in the Indian subcontinent. (omicsonline.org)
  • Notes
  • Diseases of the Ear, Nose and Throat Lecture Notes is ideal for the busy medical student new to this area or as a useful review and revision aid later in their course. (wiley.com)
  • present
  • This disease is typically present in Asian individuals in their 2nd to 4th decade of life (70-80%) [ 2 , 3 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • Another possibility is that the disease has always been present, but now has been exacerbated by a change in environmental conditions, including climate change. (nature.org)
  • For example: in a murine model, Crohn's disease can be precipitated by a norovirus, but only when both a specific gene variant is present and a certain toxin has damaged the gut. (wikipedia.org)
  • In 2012 the northern long-eared myotis (Myotis septentrionalis) was reported to be extirpated from all sites where the disease has been present for >4 years. (wikipedia.org)
  • Books
  • His reputation grew even more with the publication of three important books, which became the founding stones of the new specialty of laryngology: The Use of the Laryngoscope in Diseases of the Throat (1865). (wikipedia.org)
  • He published several books on laryngoscopy and diseases of the throat. (wikipedia.org)
  • known
  • in 1948 reported it in literature titled "On the unusual granulation combined with hyperplastic changes of lymphatic tissue" after which this entity became widely known as Kimura's disease [ 1 ]. (omicsonline.org)
  • Conditions of the human integumentary system constitute a broad spectrum of diseases, also known as dermatoses, as well as many nonpathologic states (like, in certain circumstances, melanonychia and racquet nails). (wikipedia.org)
  • means
  • Once infected, the herpes virus will destroy any virus it means he was performing oral sex on your lip or nose. (zapcoldsoresaway.com)
  • This means that there should be a high disease occurrence in those carrying an pathogen, evidence of a serologicalresponse to the pathogen, and the success of vaccination prevention. (wikipedia.org)