• newborns
  • We report our preliminary experiences with screening of 24,300 newborns during a 6 month-period when 1 infant with biotinidase deficiency was detected. (biomedsearch.com)
  • METHODS: This prospective study of neonatal hearing screening function, initiated systematically by the 2008 at the Clinical Center Kragujevac, included full-term newborns and premature born ones, within the first 24 h after birth, using a DPOAEs interacoustics otoread-screener. (biomedsearch.com)
  • The costs of screening and diagnosis of haemoglobinopathies in newborns reported here are for a region where the prevalence is relatively high, but the model presented allows costs to be quantified for both targeted and universal screening in areas of differing prevalence. (bmj.com)
  • It describes the use of objective testing methods (usually otoacoustic emission (OAE) testing or automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) testing) to screen the hearing of well newborns in a particular target region. (wikipedia.org)
  • and an average of 1:12,000 observed in the neonatal screening of over 20 million newborns. (wikipedia.org)
  • prevalence
  • Sprinkle et al 6 looked at prevalence and costs of screening in individual States and concluded that universal screening could be provided at socially acceptable costs in demographically arranged diverse States, with cooperation on screening between some States. (bmj.com)
  • UNHS
  • The Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening Program (UNHS) is a statewide service coordinated by the Women's and Children's Health Network in South Australia. (cyh.com)
  • South Australia commenced its pilot program in August 2002 across three metropolitan hospitals and two country hospitals, establishing protocols for a statewide Universal Neonatal Hearing Screening Program (UNHS). (cyh.com)
  • A National Newborn Hearing Screening Committee was formed in 2004 to lobby the Commonwealth Government for permanent newborn hearing screening programs to be implemented across Australia, and in the same year the South Australian Minister for Health announced that the UNHS Program would be permanently funded and implemented across the state by the end of 2005. (cyh.com)
  • Disorders
  • 1978) states, "screening is a process by which individuals are identified who may have disease or disorders that are otherwise undetected" and which many have "findings of asymptomatic cases" (Haggard & Hughes, 1991). (wikipedia.org)
  • Cataract & IOL Clinic - The Cataract Clinic at SECI is equipped to screen, detect, diagnose and offer right procedural corrections for cataract and cataract related eye disorders. (wikipedia.org)
  • sickle cell
  • Anionwu is a member and patron of multiple committees: Sickle Cell Society Nigerian Nurses Charitable Association UK Vice President of Unite/Community Practitioners and Health Visitors Association Editorial Advisory Board of Nursing Standard NHS Sickle Cell & Thalassemia Screening Program Steering Group Honorary Advisor to the Chief Nursing Officer's Black & Minority Ethnic Advisory Group Retiring in 2007, Anionwu remained active in the nursing community and overlooks many projects. (wikipedia.org)
  • diagnosis
  • Greater use of prenatal diagnosis, resulting in termination, and therefore fewer affected births, reduces the cost effectiveness of universal screening. (bmj.com)
  • When evaluated according to Wilson and Jungner's criteria, 5 screening for neonatal hypoglycemia does not meet the following criteria: the natural history of the condition is understood, there is a test that is easy to interpret, and the diagnosis and treatment are cost effective. (aappublications.org)
  • Dried Blood
  • The limitations of sensitivity and specificity when screening such small volumes of blood restricted the use of dried blood spots for many years. (wikipedia.org)
  • disorder
  • A hearing screening is considered valid, according to McPherson and Olusanya (2008), "if it detects the majority of subjects with the target disorder (high sensitivity) and excludes most subjects without the disorder (high specificity) and if a positive test indicates the presence of the disorder (high positive predictive value). (wikipedia.org)
  • detect
  • 1998). Lastly, hearing screenings may be able to detect transient hearing losses that may dissipate with appropriate medical intervention. (wikipedia.org)
  • Results
  • Their results indicated the cost effectiveness of universal screening in US populations where 5% of births were of African-American origin. (bmj.com)
  • Infant
  • With technologies for newborn hearing screening in regular use internationally by the mid-1990s, a lack of such programs in Australia continued to result in a delay in the detection of hearing loss until later stages of infant development. (cyh.com)
  • populations
  • 1 These decisions should depend on the proportions of the population who carry haemoglobinopathy traits, which are related to the concentration of specific ethnic populations (African, Caribbean, Mediterranean, Asian, and those from the Far East and Middle East) and costs of selection, screening, and follow up. (bmj.com)
  • Tsevat et al 3 concluded that screening black populations in the USA was very worthwhile, but for non-black populations the cost was high for each case found and life extended. (bmj.com)
  • health
  • It is intended that this analysis will inform commissioning decisions on appropriate levels of screening for different health districts and supplement existing guidance. (bmj.com)
  • According to the World Health Organization (1971), screening is a "medical investigation that does not arise from a patient's request for advice for specific complains. (wikipedia.org)
  • Hospital
  • The hearing screen is performed prior to discharge from hospital by the midwife or designated screener and is most often performed at the baby's bedside. (cyh.com)
  • neonates
  • The use of continuous interstitial glucose monitoring of at-risk neonates in the Children With Hypoglycemia and Their Later Development study group 4 showed that 23% of neonates with no documented hypoglycemia on blood glucose screening had ≥1 hypoglycemic episode on continuous monitoring. (aappublications.org)
  • test
  • By this method, complete data are found on a whole presynaptic auditory nervous system functioning that has mostly been affected by pathological changes making it a perfect screening test. (biomedsearch.com)
  • present
  • Inclusion of the Phe/Tyr ratio has decreased the number of false positive screening outcomes to the present PPV of 0.92 without any known missed cases. (ki.se)
  • intervention
  • Newborn hearing screening is becoming popular as it aims to reduce the age of detection for hearing loss-meaning that diagnosed children can receive early intervention, which is more effective because the brain's ability to learn language (spoken, cued, or signed) reduces as the child ages. (wikipedia.org)
  • Yoshinaga-Itano C. From screening to early identification and intervention: Discovering predictors to successful outcomes for children with significant hearing loss. (wikipedia.org)
  • services
  • Screening services should aim to cover a screened population which will generate a workload over 25 000 births a year, and preferably over 40 000. (bmj.com)
  • risk
  • A particular problem inherent in screening only high risk groups is that some individuals belonging to these groups may be difficult to identify. (bmj.com)