• spinal
  • A structured objective form designed to assist osteopathic physicians in the evaluation of fascial restriction, restriction of spinal motion, and muscle spasticity was developed for use during osteopathic musculoskeletal structural examinations. (jaoa.org)
  • In the present study, confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the relationships between fascial and spinal motion restrictions in addition to spasticity. (jaoa.org)
  • Lower motor neurons transmit nerve signals from your spinal cord to your muscles. (verywell.com)
  • In other words, there is impaired nerve transmission from the brain and spinal cord to the nerves that control your muscles. (verywell.com)
  • The disorder causes flaccid paraplegia (impairment of motor function in lower extremities), total areflexia (below normal or absence of reflexes) of the pelvic limbs and anus, loss of deep pain perception caudal (toward the coccyx, or tail) to the site of spinal cord injury, muscular atrophy (wasting away of muscle tissue), depressed mental state, and respiratory difficulty due to intercostal (muscles that run between the ribs) and diaphragmatic paralysis. (wikipedia.org)
  • Steroids may be prescribed to reduce swelling of the spinal cord, pain, and spasticity. (wikipedia.org)
  • There is no evidence of the degeneration of spinal motor neurons or muscle wasting (amyotrophy) that occurs in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). (wikipedia.org)
  • Impaired ability of damaged motor neurons to regulate descending pathways gives rise to disordered spinal reflexes, increased excitability of muscle spindles, and decreased synaptic inhibition. (wikipedia.org)
  • Limb
  • In clinical trials, treatment with Botox was found to be beneficial to patients with upper limb spasticity. (healthcanal.com)
  • Botox has not been shown to be safe and effective treatment for other upper limb muscles, spasticity in the legs, or for treatment of fixed contracture - a condition that affects range of motion. (healthcanal.com)
  • The 1913 use in Germany of the rhizotomy procedure by Otfrid Foerster, often wrongly credited as the father of rhizotomy, was therefore actually not the first such use, since Sherrington's studies were used as a basis for performing posterior root rhizotomy for the relief of spasticity in the lower limb muscles. (wikipedia.org)
  • Dystonic hypertonia refers to muscle resistance to passive stretching (in which a therapist gently stretches the inactive contracted muscle to a comfortable length at very low speeds of movement) and a tendency of a limb to return to a fixed involuntary (and sometimes abnormal) posture following movement. (wikipedia.org)
  • upper motor
  • Hypertonia is a term sometimes used synonymously with spasticity and rigidity in the literature surrounding damage to the central nervous system, namely upper motor neuron lesions. (wikipedia.org)
  • Gait
  • A separate study found that the gait could be a compensatory movement due to weakened plantarflexion muscles. (wikipedia.org)
  • hypertonia
  • Inhibitory pressure (applying firm pressure over muscle tendon) and promoting body heat retention and rhythmic rotation (slow repeated rotation of affected body part to stimulate relaxation) have also been proposed as potential methods to decrease hypertonia. (wikipedia.org)
  • relax
  • You can also get shots of botulinum toxin (such as Botox or Myobloc) to relax your muscles. (webmd.com)
  • scale
  • The Modified Ashworth scale (MAS) measures resistance during passive soft-tissue stretching and is used as a simple measure of spasticity. (wikipedia.org)
  • children
  • It is also variously claimed by clinicians that another advantage to doing the surgery so young is that it is inherently easier for these extremely young children to restrengthen their muscles and to re-learn how to walk, often having the effect that later in life, they do not even remember the period of time when they lived with the spasticity at all. (wikipedia.org)
  • Tendon
  • Botox therapy is used to paralyze the calf muscles to reduce the opposition of the muscles to stretching the Achilles tendon, usually together with serial casting or splinting. (wikipedia.org)
  • involvement
  • However, people with advanced MS sometimes have lower motor neuron involvement, which can lead to muscle twitching-although, again, this is rare. (verywell.com)
  • Speech therapy may be useful for those with involvement of the facial muscles. (wikipedia.org)
  • usually
  • These surgeries can help, but they're usually only for extreme cases of spasticity and are rarely performed in patients with MS. (webmd.com)
  • Let's take a closer look at fasciculations (not usually related to your MS) and spasticity or clonus (likely related to your MS). (verywell.com)
  • posture
  • The Gross Motor Quotient measures the ability to use large muscle systems for locomotion, maintain a stable posture when not moving, and throw/catch objects. (clinicaltrials.gov)